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The White Bug by pmbrunelle
Started on: 01-03-2019 10:14 AM
Replies: 23 (574 views)
Last post by: Spadesluck on 02-09-2019 11:04 PM
pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 10:14 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I purchased this Fiero in December 2016. A mostly bone-stock 1985 SE, with 53k miles.
Minimal rust and fairly decent paint; should look good enough (by my standard) with a wash and wax, and some minor fixes (dew wipes, headliner, that sort of thing).
It came with the automatic transmission, but that's fine; transmissions can be changed.

Half an hour into the 2 hour drive home, the 2.8 started knocking; the car had to be towed.

The engine's death signaled to me: PROJECT TIME!
Time to do the turbo project I've always wanted for a Fiero, get rid of the slushbox, and fix the "incidentals" while I'm at it.

Now that I've been working on the car a little while, I guess it's a good time to make a project thread.

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 10:42 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

For the transmission, I decided to go with the Muncie 4-speed. Since this is my first real car project, I wanted something simple for a first-timer... I didn't want to pull a speed gear and have a bunch of needles fall all over the place.

I don't know how the Fiero Muncie will cope with more torque than stock, but Archie sold V8 kits to work with the stock transmission, so... I'll see what happens.
I made sure to use the ribbed case, not the smooth case.

Anyway, so here I am scavenging pieces from three Muncies, in order to make myself a good one:



I got a few brand-new parts to supplement the scavenged stuff.

Here, I clean the transmission case:



Closing up the transmission. From my collection of scavenged shims, I was able to shim the tapered roller bearings without having to buy or modify any shims.
I didn't have the required shifter shaft selective washer on hand, so I just machined the shift shaft to compensate.



I decided to use the complete 1984 M19 gearset.

I thought about using the 3.31/1.95 1st/2nd from the M17, since they're closer together than the 3.53/1.95 1st/2nd of the M19.
However, I wanted the deep 1st gear reduction.
My previous Fiero had an Isuzu transmission, and I learned to deal with the wide 1st/2nd gap. The M19 is no worse than what I've become used to.

All buttoned up:



Of course, an automatic car needs more than just a transmission! It needs a 3rd pedal:



And a shifter assembly. Before cleanup:



After cleanup:

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Spadesluck
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Report this Post01-03-2019 11:08 AM Click Here to See the Profile for SpadesluckSend a Private Message to SpadesluckEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I did that very same thing to my shifter. It looked terrible before rebuilding and painting it.

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 11:16 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

The reverse interlock roller was actually seized. I worked it free, but I don't think it made a difference that could be felt by the driver.

Having the shifter cleaned up, it's like driving a freshly washed car with shiny paint. Even though it makes no functional difference, it's still more fun to drive. It's psychological.

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BadNewsBrendan
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Report this Post01-03-2019 11:34 AM Click Here to See the Profile for BadNewsBrendanSend a Private Message to BadNewsBrendanEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Wonder if I can convince my roommate to let me do the same thing with our dishwasher

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 11:47 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Well you clean off the majority of the gunk before sticking it in the dishwasher. That's just for the final touch of clean.

Then, you put the auto parts in the dishwasher without telling anyone; it's easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.

You can explain that whatever grime remains on the parts is no worse than last night's chicken wing grease that's slathered over the dish plates.

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 12:10 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

For the engine, my friend gave me a 3.1 from a Chevrolet Beretta. Aside from the additional ~300 cc of displacement, I wanted it since it comes with a crankshaft position sensor.
The crankshaft position sensor provides the best possible angle information to the ECU, compared to using a distributor with slack in the timing chain.

Driving manners are important to me; for the ECU to do a good job, all its inputs have to be clean.

This is the setup I used to polish the #981 crankshaft's main journals.
I used the shoelace method for the throws.



I had the block decked to remove pitting that would prevent the head gasket from sealing, particularly since a turbo engine has more cylinder pressure than stock. I'm using the Fel-Pro MLS head gaskets.
I got hypereutectic dished pistons, 0.75 mm over.
The machinist bored the cylinders to 0.80 mm over, to give me a little more piston-to-wall clearance. From the turbo engine's extra heat, more clearance is needed to avoid seizing the piston in the bore.
I also filed the piston rings to have larger-than usual gaps, again to deal with the heat.

The displacement is 3192 cc with a compression ratio of 7.4.



The obligatory top end cover painting. I used single-stage DuPont (Axalta nowadays?) Nason paint.



Here I am inspecting the camshaft's lobe lift as I rotate the crankshaft.
The camshaft is a hydraulic flat tappet cam from Crower. I told them about my turbo build, and they specified it for me. It has a 114° LSA.
A Cloyes double-roller chain drives the camshaft.
I installed a high-volume oil pump.



The clutch is the RAM 9.75" HD unit from the Fiero Store. I know that some people use it with the Cadillac 4.9, so it should hold a decent amount of torque.
Eventually, as I crank up the boost pressure, the clutch might slip. Not a big deal, I'll change the clutch if there's an issue.

Making sure that the pressure plate won't rub the inside of the bellhousing:



Cylinder heads are stock. I didn't port the heads, as I didn't want to risk dinging the valve seats and needing a valve job (more expenditures).
I replaced the exhaust valves (pitted contact faces), and lapped all 12 valves.
Valve springs are new; they came with the camshaft.
I have 1.52 roller-tipped rockers for these heads.



Long block (mostly) complete:

[This message has been edited by pmbrunelle (edited 01-03-2019).]

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 12:42 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

In a standard 90s GM setup, the crankshaft position sensor is wired to the DIS brick.

I don't want a DIS; I want my Fiero to have the classic distributor look. Hence, in this setup, the crank sensor is read "directly" by the ECU; no DIS brick in between.

I did, however, make a circuit to convert the crank sensor's weak analog signal into a robust digital signal.
It uses a Maxim MAX9924 integrated circuit to do the job.
The case is made from CNC-machined nylon 6/6.



The converter circuit is located as close as possible to the crank sensor, to reduce the chance of picking up noise in the leads.



The converter also provides threaded mounting holes for the GM knock sensor module, which goes right on top of it:



The modules are potted in urethane for sealing out the elements.
I made three of them, since if the module ever dies, I can't just walk into NAPA and get a replacement.
I left one module not potted; in case I discover a design flaw that led to the failure of the first two, I'd be able to make some changes before potting and installation into the car.



Here is a test I did, turning over the engine with the starter.
A tooth on the crankshaft is passing by the crankshaft sensor at the moment of this oscilloscope capture.

Top trace: analog signal from crankshaft position sensor
Bottom trace: digital signal sent to ECU

[This message has been edited by pmbrunelle (edited 01-03-2019).]

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 01:01 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Since the battery tray was falling apart, I decided to replace it with a new Fiero Store unit.

However, the root of (I think) the battery tray rust problem, common to many Fieros, is that the battery acid overflows and leaks onto the metal below.

Therefore, I decided to make a polypropylene battery tray. It is designed to channel any liquids to a drain fitting, on which a drain line can be installed to direct any liquids to the ground.



I also didn't like factory method of gripping the battery by the two lips at the bottom. I don't find the factory method secure enough, especially when the rust bug bites.

So, I decided to hold down the battery more positively, with a flatbar over the top and rods keeping the flatbar in its place.

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 01:20 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Since I want to put the turbo above the transmission, I moved the ignition coil over to the trunk wall to get it away from the heat.

As this engine won't have a working HEI module to fire the ignition coil, I installed a Bosch ignition module. This particular Bosch module came from an 80s Volvo.

In the Volvo application, the module is mounted on its own heatsink, which is then screwed onto the fender. I decided to use this entire module + heatsink assembly.
There were other heatsinks used with Bosch modules, but I liked the shape of this one for my Fiero.

[This message has been edited by pmbrunelle (edited 01-03-2019).]

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 01:25 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Well that just about sums up the major chunks of work completed so far.

As other blocks of work are completed, I'll post them. The next block of work to complete is the water injection system, followed by the distributor sensor, and everything else after that.

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Daryl M
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Report this Post01-03-2019 02:48 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Daryl MClick Here to Email Daryl MSend a Private Message to Daryl MEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Very nice!

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Report this Post01-03-2019 07:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 88FingersClick Here to Email 88FingersSend a Private Message to 88FingersEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Wow man! Wow! I am totally speechless, that's why I have to type this as I am speechless. What wonderful and innovative work you are doing PMB. You are making Canadian Fieros proud! Bravo!!

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Report this Post01-03-2019 07:47 PM Click Here to See the Profile for RaydarClick Here to Email RaydarSend a Private Message to RaydarEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by pmbrunelle:

In a standard 90s GM setup, the crankshaft position sensor is wired to the DIS brick.

I don't want a DIS; I want my Fiero to have the classic distributor look. Hence, in this setup, the crank sensor is read "directly" by the ECU; no DIS brick in between.

I did, however, make a circuit to convert the crank sensor's weak analog signal into a robust digital signal.
It uses a Maxim MAX9924 integrated circuit to do the job.
The case is made from CNC-machined nylon 6/6.

<snip>



Holy smokes, man!
You do some nice work!

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-03-2019 10:09 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Thanks for the nice remarks.

Actually Raydar, I think I got the idea of the RAM HD clutch from one of your posts, where you said you were happy using it with your 4.9 Cadillac.

So I decided to buy the RAM HD clutch.

Afterwards, I saw a thread of yours where you mentioned that your RAM clutch blew up
I guess I'll see what happens!

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Report this Post01-04-2019 03:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for RaydarClick Here to Email RaydarSend a Private Message to RaydarEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by pmbrunelle:

Thanks for the nice remarks.

Actually Raydar, I think I got the idea of the RAM HD clutch from one of your posts, where you said you were happy using it with your 4.9 Cadillac.

So I decided to buy the RAM HD clutch.

Afterwards, I saw a thread of yours where you mentioned that your RAM clutch blew up
I guess I'll see what happens!


Actually, that was a comedy of errors. (Ya' learn... ya' know?)

In the first place, the HTOB Getrag really requires a Cavalier clutch assembly. The Fiero clutch assembly is ~3/8" too tall (flywheel surface to tips of release fingers) to provide for adequate clutch wear.

In the second place, the depression in the center of the LSC flywheel was too small in diameter for that particular disk. The rivets around the edge of the hub actually made contact with the friction surface of the flywheel. Eventually, as the clutch wore, the rivets stopped the disk from pressing cleanly against the flywheel. These were NOT the rivets that held the lining to the disk. The disk was probably only about 10% worn, when the rivets started making themselves known.
I can send you links to pics of the "rivet" thing, if you'd like.

Nothing ever blew up. The clutch was fine. The application was... lacking.

Edit - My swap thread has been updated.
http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum1/HTML/098659.html

[This message has been edited by Raydar (edited 01-06-2019).]

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2.5
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Report this Post01-07-2019 11:23 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Good stuff! Thanks for posting it
How did you refinish the shiftier mechanism parts that weren't painted?

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-07-2019 12:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

After taking the shifter apart, I sandblasted everything. Fast way to clean the spaces between the coils of the spring and other small places.

The sandblast takes off everything and leaves a rough surface that is good for paint to stick onto.

The sandblasted finish is also good at picking up other types of stains, and good at rusting.
I don't like the feel of sandblasted threads either.

So, for these other surfaces, I like to wirebrush them smooth, to make the rough sandblasted finish shiny.

Then, to protect (sort of) the unpainted surfaces, I rubbed motor oil on them, but since the shifter is in the cabin under the center console, I don't think the oil will be washed/rubbed away so easily.

From my time in the Militia, I know that guns require regular applications of oil to keep the rust at bay.

In this case, I would expect the metal to eventually become rusty, as I don't plan on regularly reapplying the oil... but since it took 30 years for the original shifter (which didn't have oil) to get light cosmetic rust, I think this shifter will be good for quite a while. Functional, at least.

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Report this Post01-08-2019 08:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by pmbrunelle:

After taking the shifter apart, I sandblasted everything. Fast way to clean the spaces between the coils of the spring and other small places.

The sandblast takes off everything and leaves a rough surface that is good for paint to stick onto.

The sandblasted finish is also good at picking up other types of stains, and good at rusting.
I don't like the feel of sandblasted threads either.

So, for these other surfaces, I like to wirebrush them smooth, to make the rough sandblasted finish shiny.

Then, to protect (sort of) the unpainted surfaces, I rubbed motor oil on them, but since the shifter is in the cabin under the center console, I don't think the oil will be washed/rubbed away so easily.

From my time in the Militia, I know that guns require regular applications of oil to keep the rust at bay.

In this case, I would expect the metal to eventually become rusty, as I don't plan on regularly reapplying the oil... but since it took 30 years for the original shifter (which didn't have oil) to get light cosmetic rust, I think this shifter will be good for quite a while. Functional, at least.


Thanks.

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Report this Post01-08-2019 11:11 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierosoundClick Here to visit fierosound's HomePageClick Here to Email fierosoundSend a Private Message to fierosoundEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by pmbrunelle:

So I decided to buy the RAM HD clutch.

Afterwards, I saw a thread of yours where you mentioned that your RAM clutch blew up


Wonderful work pmbrunelle...

If the RAM clutch fails, consider Canadian made Bully Clutch. I have the same one in both my cars.
2 others here in Calgary have also bought them. (one is 3800 S/C, the other a 3400/Turbo)

We all got Stage 3. Light pedal effort, not "grabby" but high clamping and work great.
http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum2/HTML/129057.html


------------------
My World of Wheels Winners (Click on links below)

3.4L Supercharged 87 GT and Super Duty 4 Indy #163

[This message has been edited by fierosound (edited 01-14-2019).]

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post01-08-2019 12:35 PM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I'll keep the Bully in mind. When I bought the RAM, I didn't do much research, I just picked an obvious choice.

Auto modification is a pretty expensive (at least the way I do it) hobby to have, and as most parts vendors are in the USA, I'm sending a lot of money outside of our country.

I kind of feel some remorse over what I'm doing, but not enough to stop auto modification.

For my next Fiero part, I have a quotation from an online Netherlands-based CNC machining service https://www.3dhubs.com ready to go.
However, I did send an RFQ to a local Grand-Mère machine shop, so if they want the job, I'll probably order from them.

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Report this Post01-12-2019 12:06 AM Click Here to See the Profile for hercimer01Send a Private Message to hercimer01Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post



You're like some sort of Wizard or something?

------------------
Project Genisis Lo Budget 3800SC swap
12.840@104.8 MPH Intense-Racing 1.9 rockers, 3" exhaust, 3.4 pulley, ZZP tune and 18 year old tires.

88 Coupe under construction SOLD

88 formula 3.4L 4t60 swap SOLD

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pmbrunelle
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Report this Post02-09-2019 03:53 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pmbrunelleClick Here to Email pmbrunelleSend a Private Message to pmbrunelleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I (nearly) finished the distributor!

Since I want to run sequential fuel injection, just the crank sensor alone is not enough.
When the computer reads the double-notch on the crankshaft, that corresponds with TDC compression #1 AND TDC compression #4.
How to tell the two TDCs apart?

Following the double-notch, the computer will poll (read) the value from the distributor sensor, which shall be different for TDC #1 vs TDC #4.

For the electronics, I started by gutting some el-cheapo ignition modules. I just wanted them for their cases.


Modding the cases slightly so they can accept a PCB on top.
Someone who knows Fieros might notice that something's not stock when they see the coil connector on the left is missing.


Drawing the PCB on the computer:


A view of the module's interior, before closing it up:


Mounted on top of the PCB in through-hole fashion is the Allegro A1250 Hall-effect bipolar latch.
The legs are splayed to improve vibration resistance, and to make soldering easier.
Depending on the polarity (North or South) of the magnetic field going through the sensor, it will output zero or 5 volts.


These magnets are leftovers from work. They are isotropic injection-molded NdFeB with a PPS binder.
These particular examples have been diametrically magnetized.
One side of the magnet has a North pole; the other side a South pole.


The magnet is located in a groove in an aluminium hat (made by 3dhubs).
Silicone potting compound encapsulates the magnet to keep it in place and to protect it from the ozone.
The 12 mounting holes allow me to time the hat such that the North pole is centered around TDC #1, and the South pole around TDC #4.
Or vice versa; the polarity requirement can be switched in software.


The distributor was gutted and modified to accept the aluminium hat:


Here is the assembly:


All it needs now is some conformal coating to protect the Hall sensor, and some RTV to seal it up. Maybe a dab of RTV behind the Hall sensor too. Last, but not least, these modules need serial numbers.

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Report this Post02-09-2019 11:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for SpadesluckSend a Private Message to SpadesluckEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Very cool stuff indeed!

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