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Neil's Aventador build by Neils88
Started on: 03-02-2015 11:34 PM
Replies: 712 (62182 views)
Last post by: 355Fiero on 10-03-2020 01:02 PM
Neils88
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Report this Post04-19-2015 01:12 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by ltlfrari:

What graphics packages are you using for the dials etc. I played around with some stuff many years ago but I am no graphics programmer and it was really hard work. I figured there must be a myriad packages to handle all that stuff now.


I'm not using any graphics packages or libraries. There are some packages out there that are specifically designed for car applications but all the ones I've found are all commercial packages, and quite expensive (they are really geared for car manufacturers). So as a result I write all my own routines from scratch. I am using GDI graphics (the most basic graphical interface). I've messed around with DirectX and OpenGL for some time now, but I'm not strong enough with either at the moment. They are definitely the best way to go for performance since they push all the processing over to the GPU, but they are also very complicated to master. I do all my programming in C++, using Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (I have VS2010, but I don't like it as much). If anyone wants a copy of my code, just PM me and I will happily forward it (I'll have to ZIP the project files). The current version of my dash program doesn't interface with the sensor input yet. The sensor data will be fed into an Arduino (both digital and analog signals as required, some additional circuitry may be required to interpret / modify some signals for compatibility) which then continuously passes the data to the main computer through a USB (serial comm) port. I haven't started writing the comms interface yet, but it is relatively straight forward. This part (the fun part ) will take a little bit of time, since I'll have to go through and locate each relevant signal and determine its transmission parameters so I can correctly interface with it.

[This message has been edited by Neils88 (edited 04-19-2015).]

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Report this Post04-30-2015 08:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for R.A.DClick Here to visit R.A.D's HomePageSend a Private Message to R.A.DEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
looking forward to your build
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Neils88
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Report this Post05-04-2015 08:12 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I've been working on interfacing with the electronic power steering (EPS) that I acquired out of the Chevy Cobalt. Unfortunately, I've hit a snag and will have to concede defeat. Let me explain what is required...

With everything hooked up and connecting the EPS data link using an Arduino with a CAN bus shield, you need to pass the following information in order for the system to operate:

- transmit an initial high voltage wakeup pulse (0x100 at 12V, instead of the standard 5V normally used). This puts the EPS into Listen mode
- transmit a directed wakeup pulse (0x621 1 FF FF FF FF 00 00 00). In this case the BCM (ID 0x621) can send a signal to wake up all devices
- transmit a "heartbeat" pulse every 1-2 seconds to stop the required devices from going back to sleep (0x621 0 FF FF FF FF 00 00 00)
- transmit the production code...selects one of 8 vehicle configurations (BCM)
- transmit an engine-on signal (ECM)
- transmit vehicle speed (ECM)
- respond to specific queries from EPS....

(you get the idea...oh, and if you miss one step then it will send an error code and shut down...)

(note: the GMLAN is a high speed CAN bus that runs at 500KBPS)

The first three steps were easy, but I can't find the other codes needed. If I had a week with a Chevy Cobalt, then I would be able to scan and read the all the CAN bus traffic, and eventually narrow down the data that I need. There are quite a few people that have done similar projects, but to be successful, you absolutely need a running vehicle to get the necessary data.

So. Where do I go from here?

This is where I can give some good news.

I have removed the EPS control module, which has given me lots more leg room. I had a little bit of fun with the system and hooked up the power steering motor to a high power motor controller getting a PWM (pulse width modulated) feed from an Arduino microprocessor. This allowed me to operate the EPS directly from my laptop. That's a powerful motor! I was able to steer the car using nothing but the laptop. (don't worry...just sitting in the garage, lol). The EPS can turn the wheels from lock to lock in less than 5 seconds! Maybe my next project will be a self-driving car? ...maybe not, lol

Now that I've removed the controller, this leaves direct access to the two torque sensors. I will be setting up a small circuit that will be able to read the differential voltage output from the two sensors. For the electronics guys out there, the two torque sensors are the inductive type. I'll feed an oscillating signal to both inductors, then amplify the differential signal. I can then use this torque signal in conjunction with the VSS signal to drive the EPS.

In further news, the body kit is finally ready to get shipped. Hopefully I'll be able to pick it up next week.
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Neils88
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Report this Post05-23-2015 07:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
It's been a few weeks since I posted. I was away for my daughters university convocation.

I also finally was able to pick up most of the pieces of the body kit. I should be receiving all the smaller pieces soon (dash pod, mirrors, grill surrounds, etc). The pieces I received should keep my busy for the next 5-6 months...

The single hardest part of a body kit is finding the single point of reference with which to start from. It sounds trivial, but it is really hard when you are looking at a pile of parts that need to be pieced together.. I am using the front wheels as my reference in conjunction with the ground clearance of each vehicle. The Fiero has about 5.5" ground clearance, whereas the Aventador has about 4". (numbers rounded off a bit since it's not realistic to be that exact with measurements for a car sitting on jackstands)

Once I've established a point of reference, I will start to align each piece with respect to that reference and create the necessary framing structure for each piece. Each panel will be secured to it's respective frame structure, and the frame structures will be bolted to the spaceframe. This will allow a certain degree of adjustment to assist with the "gapping" of panels.

I have removed the roof structure of the Fiero. This allows the Aventador roof to sit flat and aide in the panel alignment process. I've also removed the upper portion of the rear trunk walls. Unfortunately, my new Ryobi sawzall decided to commit suicide. Hope I kept the receipt...

Here is a teaser of some of the panels (very) roughly in position...





One thing to note...this kit has been slightly adjusted and instead of spending $5k for an Aventador windshield, it will use a 2000 Infiniti I30 windshield, which I can pick up new for less than $250.

...I really need a bigger garage!
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Neils88
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Report this Post05-24-2015 07:47 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I ended up reinstalling the drivers side rear axle. This turned out to be much easier to use as a reference point. Some more pictures showing rough alignment of the rear sections. Now that I have the rough alignment, I can finish removing the parts of the Fiero that are interfering and begin the framing structure.





[This message has been edited by Neils88 (edited 05-25-2015).]

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Report this Post05-25-2015 03:48 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Fastfrog007Send a Private Message to Fastfrog007Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Sweet Sassy Molassy!

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Neils88
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Report this Post05-25-2015 12:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Fastfrog007:

Sweet Sassy Molassy!


Too bad I can't fit that expression onto a license plate
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Neils88
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Report this Post05-25-2015 06:55 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Another view. Shows just how wide Aventadors are...

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Neils88
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Report this Post05-28-2015 09:31 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Panels are now off and I'm getting ready to put the engine back in. This is necessary at this time for three reasons...1) I'll get a much better idea for any interference issues 2) once the rear bumper molding is on, I won't be able to wrap a chain around the metal bumper to hoist the rear end of the car (my preferred choice when installing/removing the engine) 3) as I mentioned before, my garage is too small and I've simply run out of space

I took a moment to do a little trimming around the rear. The trunk had to go, since the Aventador needs the space for the center exhaust. I removed the lower portion of the trunk, and the upper rear section. The forward section of the trunk was lowered down to the strut tower cross brace. I left a little metal below that so that I have a location to secure the brake lines, fuel lines, vacuum lines and coolant lines.



Should be able to the engine back in tomorrow.
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Neils88
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Report this Post05-29-2015 10:00 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Got the engine / transmission / cradle (no suspension) installed today. There is so much room in the engine bay now... I'm really looking forward to getting to fill that space properly. I might even think about re-designing the suspension and have the coilovers (I'll be getting them soon) leaning inwards and meeting at the center above the longitudinal transaxle that I'll be using eventually... However, have to keep my mind on the current project.



Obviously there are a number of items that need to be lengthened and installed, but I'll worry about those a little later.
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Report this Post05-30-2015 08:43 AM Click Here to See the Profile for firebossClick Here to Email firebossSend a Private Message to firebossEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Amazing all the room you got ....keep it up
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-03-2015 10:28 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
A quick look at the front end. The front spaceframe section has been cut (just forward of the headlight mounts) and will be stretched and dropped several inches to better line up with the bumper molding. The metal bumper will be cut to properly fit into the molding and then reinstalled. The forward spaceframe section will also be widened to allow the Aventador headlights to fit and have a proper bracket available for mounting. The large open area will eventually be walled in (sheet metal? fiberglass? ) to create the new front trunk. There is a fair bit of space there, extending right to the front bulkhead, so I'll be able to make a small closed off space next to the brake booster / master cylinder to carry some tools and a tire sealant / inflation bottle (not going to carry a spare).

The picture shows how the front section has been cut off, roughly aligned and held in place with some C-clamps. Once I get the height and location locked in, then the whole unit will be welded in and made to blend in as much as possible.

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Neils88
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Report this Post06-06-2015 10:46 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Starting to frame up the roof section. I plan on "re-purposing" the Fiero roof, specifically the forward and rear sections. A small piece has been removed from the middle of the rear section, and the B pillar angles have been opened up to match the Aventador roof. The B pillars still need to be modified to account for the small quarter window. Lots more work needed on the front section and the A pillars will be beefed up substantially. I'll also add some addition bracing due to the large unsupported area of fiberglass.


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Neils88
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Report this Post06-09-2015 10:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Slow progress, but got a little more framing completed on the roof section. Have to be really careful to ensure everything is lined up at the correct angles. I'll be building the roof section up for maximum strength whilst maintaining the thin stock panel profile.



The complex part is that the roof isn't flat or a simple curve. It is modeled after a stealth fighter, so it has multiple angles (tough to see in the pics) which makes it a little bit harder to get all the pieces to line up properly....

[This message has been edited by Neils88 (edited 06-09-2015).]

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Report this Post06-09-2015 10:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for zzzhuhSend a Private Message to zzzhuhEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Keep up the good work mate! It looks like it is coming together, can't wait to see it complete!

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Neils88
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Report this Post06-10-2015 10:04 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by zzzhuh:

Keep up the good work mate! It looks like it is coming together, can't wait to see it complete!



Thanks zzzhuh, There is definitely a satisfying feeling as I progress
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-13-2015 08:25 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Spent several hours welding a number of parts together...then noticed I had the heat setting wrong (I was looking at the welder from above and read it backwards). The welds looked nice, but doubtful that I had good penetration. I wasn't taking any chances so I ground down the welds and re-welded them all with the correct heat setting. Then....during the last weld of the day...this happened....



Thick smoke was pouring out of the welder One of the switches melted. I ordered some new switches, so the welder will be out of action for the next week or so until they arrive. That's ok...lots of other work I can do while I wait
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-14-2015 05:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
With the welder down for a bit, I'm taking this opportunity to do some minor surgery on the spaceframe. The dash needs some work in order to fit in the correct location, which is a little lower and forward than possible with the existing framing. It's much easier to get the dash positioned without the roof in the way. The first step is to remove the lower windshield support. It will be moved forward to the new location to give some additional support to the fiberglass windshield framing. I will compensate for the removed metal with a new cross support welded to the door supports. This will stiffen the complete structure, plus ensure a rigid frame for the new "lambo" doors, which require a very strong support to account for the weight of the door and the single hinge per side.



The next pic shows a rough placement of the dash panels. They still need to be moved forward another 6 inches or so. Also, you can see the positioning of the gauge pod is going to be a little bit too far out to the side. This would probably work if I was using a tube frame chassis, but doesn't fit the stock placement of the Fiero steering wheel since the Fiero is much narrower than the Aventador. I'll have to adjust this a little. You can also see the rough placement of the center console.

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Neils88
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Report this Post06-22-2015 08:01 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Neils88:





I've spent the better part of the last two weeks working on the roof section. My goal was to use the original Fiero roof, cut into quadrants, separated and then have the gaps all filled in. I figured this would come out looking close to stock. But the more I worked on it, the messier it became. I finally looked at it today and decided that it was the wrong strategy; there is just too much difference between the Fiero and Aventador roof. So today I removed the Fiero portions of the roof, and will continue building the roof frame up properly as I should have done from the beginning.
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-24-2015 09:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Back on track...



There will be a couple more pieces put in to strengthen the rear roof support, then everything will get finish welded.
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Report this Post06-25-2015 09:54 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Jason88NotchieClick Here to Email Jason88NotchieSend a Private Message to Jason88NotchieEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Words couldn't begin to express how impressed with this build!! You got some MAD SKILLS!!!
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-25-2015 08:35 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by Jason88Notchie:

Words couldn't begin to express how impressed with this build!! You got some MAD SKILLS!!!


Thank you! Glad you are enjoying it as much as I am.
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Neils88
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Report this Post06-25-2015 08:41 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Got a little bit of work done on the roof framing. The quarter glass frames are now tacked in place and I've begun the long task of finish-welding everything. I'm going a little slow and respecting the duty cycle on my welder this time. I don't need to melt any more switches.

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Report this Post06-27-2015 07:12 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I managed to finish the roof frame welding today. Before putting it into the final location I had to continue to remove some more parts of the Fiero that will effect visibility. I need to get the front part of the windshield as low as possible. As you can see in the first pic, I've removed the metal that forms the windshield wiper support area. Probably not a view that most people ever get. I still need to remove some metal above each wheel well. The limiting factor will be the brake booster/master cylinder.



I tried to be careful, but I ended up with a slightly twisted frame. I'll have to make a few cuts and make sure that everything is straightened properly. I'll then need to locate the frame structure correctly along the length of the spaceframe and make sure it's aligned vertically. This is critical since it needs to be as low as possible, but also mustn't impede visibility.





The rear roll bar will be tied to vertical supports that in turn will be welded to two structural beams along the rocker panels. These will also be welded to a new lateral support brace that will make up for the metal removed above the dash. Basically everything gets tied together.

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Report this Post06-28-2015 10:08 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Dennis LaGruaClick Here to Email Dennis LaGruaSend a Private Message to Dennis LaGruaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Looking good. I admire your excellent construction skills and perseverance. Most people do not possess those qualities these days. When completed and finished, a unique Fiero rebody like this is bound to take a best of show award.

------------------
" THE BLACK PARALYZER" -87GT 3800SC Series III engine, custom ZZP /Frozen Boost Intercooler setup, 3.4" Pulley, Northstar TB, LS1 MAF, 3" Flotech Afterburner Exhaust, Autolite 104's, MSD wires, Custom CAI, 4T65eHD w. custom axles, HP Tuners VCM Suite.
"THE COLUSSUS"
87GT - ALL OUT 3.4L Turbocharged engine, Garrett Hybrid Turbo, MSD ign., modified TH125H
" ON THE LOOSE WITHOUT THE JUICE "

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Neils88
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Report this Post06-28-2015 11:00 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Dennis LaGrua:

Looking good. I admire your excellent construction skills and perseverance. Most people do not possess those qualities these days. When completed and finished, a unique Fiero rebody like this is bound to take a best of show award.



Thank you for the kind words, Dennis.

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Report this Post06-28-2015 12:01 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by Neils88:




Something I forgot to mention that you can see in this picture. That opening in the middle is the fresh air intake. Normally that would be located externally, just forward of the windshield. However, the new configuration moves the base of the windshield forward well past the intake. Somehow I'm going to have to relocate the fresh air duct forward of the new windshield while maintaining a very low profile. Since that'll likely extend under the new dash, I'll have to also consider the noise generated by the low profile ducting.

Another thought is that I move the entire HVAC system forward about 12 inches. I'm thinking about going to the local Pick-n-pull and stripping the complete system from a newer vehicle so that I can get full electronic control. I'll have to investigate that a bit. Obviously it would be easier to get it all set up now while I don't have anything in the way.
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Report this Post07-01-2015 04:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
More work on the front end. Stripping it down to the basics. I'll put a stiffening brace (1"x3"x1/8") between the two lower spaceframe supports. Not seen in the picture below, I ended up removing the top supports over the wheel wells; even though I'll be lowering the suspension, I still need that area as low as possible for the fenders and the lower windshield support. The A-frames need to be tied into a structural support, in this case I'll add a longitudinal brace to replace the wheel well support that has been removed.

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Report this Post07-04-2015 03:54 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Darth ZClick Here to Email Darth ZSend a Private Message to Darth ZEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Wow man, that' s quite a project ya got there. I don' t think I would ever go that far on a car that was already in decent condition. Good look to you! Though, I doubt you'll need it. You sure seem to know what you're doing!
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Report this Post07-05-2015 06:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by Darth Z:

Wow man, that' s quite a project ya got there. I don' t think I would ever go that far on a car that was already in decent condition. Good look to you! Though, I doubt you'll need it. You sure seem to know what you're doing!


Thanks!
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Report this Post07-05-2015 06:33 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
No progress over the weekend, unfortunately, but at least I did get the windshield. I'm using the windshield from a 2000 Infiniti I30. It's a little shorter than the stock Aventador windshield, but otherwise virtually identical. It only cost me $130 (delivered) versus $5,000 for the Aventador windshield!!! Now that I have the windshield, I'll be able to finalize the windshield framing.
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Neils88
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Report this Post07-06-2015 09:58 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Had some time to fit the windshield today. It fits well except I'll need to adjust the curvature on the top and the bottom. The gap is almost 3" between the windshield and the structural support at the top, so it'll take some significant adjustment. Having said that, the fiberglass is bang on once the curvature has been adjusted.

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Neils88
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Report this Post07-07-2015 09:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Ever have one of those days where you really don't achieve anything...

I removed the front roof support brace with the intention of putting in the proper curvature (measured at 1.75" deflection at the center, not 3" as I incorrectly mentioned earlier). I made 8 cuts and made even bends along the length. Once I had the curvature exactly matched to the windshield, I tacked each cut to secure them and confirmed the curvature one more time. I then slowly and carefully welded each cut, alternating back and forth to make sure I didn't get any undesirable warpage. Once I finished the welding, I went ahead and used the grinder to dress the welds (I need it to fit tightly against the roof panel). Then I stepped back to look at what a wonderful job I had done....then I noticed something. The roof support was completely flat. Huh? I had tacked it and checked the curvature, but somewhere along the line there was enough thermal expansion...somewhere...to throw the curvature completely off, to the point where it is now completely flat. 3 hours wasted.
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Neils88
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Report this Post07-08-2015 10:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Spent a few hours tonight re-working the curvature of the front roof support. I found the best way to get this curvature right ended up being somewhat counter intuitive. I started by making the same 8 cuts that I had before. I then put the curvature into the support, but made sure I had about 3 1/2" of curvature (aiming to finish with a 1 7/8" curvature). I then welded the two outer cuts completely. As expected this started to bring down the overall curvature of the support. I repeated this with the next two cuts from the outside and kept working my way to the center. After each weld was complete, I allowed the support to cool somewhat and checked the progress of the curvature as it got closer to the desired position. When I got to the last two welds I made some adjustments and ensured the curvature was slightly greater than the desired end result. As expected, the final welds pulled some of the curvature out with the end result being an exact match to the windshield...a compound curved support. Not sure why that one was so much harder than all the others I've had to do up to now. Hopefully I can get it put back into the roof frame tomorrow.
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Report this Post07-09-2015 03:35 AM Click Here to See the Profile for E.FurgalSend a Private Message to E.FurgalEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I don't know if this be a hijack or not but With 12 volt motors being the norm in many cars for waterpumps, I've wondered what a g.m. power steering pump with divorced tank, and an electric motor spinning it, would work like, as you could tie vehicle speed and the motors speed together to have high power steering at low speeds and less or almost non at higher speeds..
could be put anywhere..
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Neils88
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Report this Post07-09-2015 05:06 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by E.Furgal:

I don't know if this be a hijack or not but With 12 volt motors being the norm in many cars for waterpumps, I've wondered what a g.m. power steering pump with divorced tank, and an electric motor spinning it, would work like, as you could tie vehicle speed and the motors speed together to have high power steering at low speeds and less or almost non at higher speeds..
could be put anywhere..


I think that's the system that is used by an MR2 and a number of other cars. Electro-hydraulic system. A normal engine mounted pump uses about 8 hp (many loses), whereas a 1 hp electric motor can be used for the same result and easily made vehicle speed sensitive. Of course I'm adapting the steering column mounted power steering system, which skips the hydraulic part altogether. I just need to design a controller that will function with the two torque sensors as input.
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Report this Post07-09-2015 10:10 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Reinstalled the front roof support. It puts the exact right curvature to follow the windshield shape. I didn't take a pic with the windshield in, but I did check it and am very happy with the result. The dash is now sufficiently low, but will still need to come forward about 4". I have a tool case that is the same height as the Fiero seat base, so useful for letting me sit in the car and get a feel for the visibility. It is much better now that the front support has the right curvature. I might actually be able to see the road now...traffic lights...not so much...


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87_special
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Report this Post07-09-2015 10:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 87_specialSend a Private Message to 87_specialEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Great work on this car so far. You've got skills for fab work! Which is good judging by the complexity of this rebody. Is this kit made for a different vehicle or Fiero specific?
Also, it may be the angle but, the steering wheel seems way too far center. How are you going to drive like that?

------------------

1987 SE / Fastback - 3500 Turdbowd / Alcoholic / '92 5-speed swap

No bandwagon here...

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Neils88
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Report this Post07-09-2015 11:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Neils88Click Here to Email Neils88Send a Private Message to Neils88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 87_special:

Great work on this car so far. You've got skills for fab work! Which is good judging by the complexity of this rebody. Is this kit made for a different vehicle or Fiero specific?
Also, it may be the angle but, the steering wheel seems way too far center. How are you going to drive like that?



Thanks.

Actually the kit is simply fiberglass panels that match the Aventador almost exactly. The person who manufactured the kit makes the molds with a CNC mill and a 3d model that is based on scans of the real car. Since the panels are basically identical to the Aventador panels, it's up to the person building the car to make them fit. You could use a tube frame chassis, a Fiero, or any other mid engine donor car. I chose to use the Fiero since it is constructed using a spaceframe, which makes fabrication a little easier in my opinion. But since the panels match the Aventador, there obviously has to be a lot of fitting and additional framework to get the kit to fit onto the Fiero. The steering wheel is in the exact same location as it is on the Fiero and lines up with the Fiero drivers seat. The center console is currently not lined up properly (and it's a little too big in my opinion, I'll be cutting it down to size when I tackle the interior) so it makes the steering wheel appear more towards the center that it really is. Also, the Aventador is wider than the Fiero, so obviously the Fiero steering wheel will be closer to the center console that it would be in the real Aventador. When you sit inside you actually don't notice it at all, and hopefully once I'm done it'll not look so out of place.
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