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Wrapping a Fiero by 78_elky
Started on: 11-09-2016 01:11 PM
Replies: 24 (990 views)
Last post by: engine man on 11-22-2016 06:30 PM
78_elky
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Report this Post11-09-2016 01:11 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Some of you might have seen my build thread.
But in case you haven't I bought an '87 Fiero SE in pieces for $250.
I tried to get it running and cleaned up, I mostly succeeded until the trans went out.
So I decided to put a 3800sc and new auto trans in the car.
While it was apart I also decided to wrap the car to cover the bad paint and so any new panels would match.

When I looked into wrapping the car I came up with very little info, so I decided to make this post so others can have some info specific to the Fiero.
If you just want general "how to apply vinyl wrap" info get on youtube and just watch all the videos you can.
I decided to use Oracle 970R its comparable to the 3M 1080 but its a little cheaper and I could get it locally from a sign shop in any amount I wanted.
Its about $8.50 a foot, and comes in a 60" wide roll. The color I used is called "Lagoon Blue".

Here is what I started with

Hopefully its kind of clear why the car needed some help and paint.
The roof and hood had the worst issues, with the paint missing and the fibers exposed.
This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

If you want all the details on the massive amount of mechanical and electrical work I've done on the car take a look at my build thread
Right here

I started with the "easy" looking parts of the car, and worked my way up to the bigger and more complex ones.



Now you have to fix any major issues with the paint because the wrap won't cover it.


The large pieces were a struggle, and a helper would have helped a lot.


I did do some pieces in multiple sections, I'm not a professional so it works for me but others might not be happy with the results of having a seam.



This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

Anyways, it was a big project and it wasn't exactly simple or really fast and had a steep learning curve,
but it was a lot less money than a paint job and I feel like I got a good finished result that I couldn't have gotten painting the car in my yard.


I bought just under 30 feet of material (5 feet wide roll) I still have 4-6 feet of the roll left, and I messed up the decklid and had to do it over again.
In fact I messed up a few pieces and I'd guess I threw away at least 3 feet of the roll in mistakes and odd left over small pieces I couldn't use.
So in total this cost me less than $300 for all the material and a few weeks while I was working on the swap.

I do have a lot of experience wrapping R/C planes with plastic covering but this vinyl is much more forgiving and easier to use and it shows in the finished product.
The first R/C planes I covered looked horrible and it took a ton of them for me to be happy with my abilities.
With the wrap I already know areas I'd do differently and if (when) I wrap another car I'll do a better job.

I've left the pictures large, I didn't want to resize them (I know that annoys some of you).
I wanted to show the picture and the textures of the bad paint as well as the wrap and the resolution of the larger pictures makes that easier.

Jessica
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Report this Post11-09-2016 01:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Looks nice.

Whats the story on the lowered quad cab?
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Report this Post11-09-2016 01:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by 2.5:

Looks nice.

Whats the story on the lowered quad cab?


'78 Crew Cab c30 dually I picked up this summer, its got a 454, turbo 400, flipped axle with a full notch in the rear (center of bed and inner fenders also cut out) and drop spindles and cut springs in the front.
Came with an air ride setup but not installed. I just finished putting the front brakes back together. I'm putting seats from an '04 suburban in it now.
Next will be welding the notch in completely and attaching the rear end to its spring mounts so I can actually drive it.
Oh and it has inverted DeVille taillights but only one is done so I'll have to finish the other one before its legal.
It was a guys project and he sold it when he moved and I ended up picking it up and all his parts for it.

Jessica

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Report this Post11-09-2016 03:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Cool custom project, you should post more pics, maybe in the "other cars" section.

//www.fiero.nl/cgi-bin...number=10&LastLogin=

[This message has been edited by 2.5 (edited 11-09-2016).]

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78_elky
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Report this Post11-09-2016 03:41 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 2.5:

Cool custom project, you should post more pics, maybe in the "other cars" section.

//www.fiero.nl/cgi-bin...number=10&LastLogin=



Maybe when I do more to it I'll start a little thread about it. I really just want to slap some power doors on it, get the new seats in and get it safe to drive so I can tow stuff when I need.
I've got an El Camino I'm doing a frame off on (in my garage, thats why the Fiero project was exiled to the carport/tent) and that is kind of my focus at the moment.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-09-2016 08:21 PM Click Here to See the Profile for viperineClick Here to Email viperineSend a Private Message to viperineEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Thanks for rekindling my interests in this kind of work, I love how it turned out for you. Do you have any suggested tools that would make this task easiest? I'm guessing a hobby knife, putty knives, scrapers, and possibly a heat gun?
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Report this Post11-10-2016 11:10 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Tony KaniaSend a Private Message to Tony KaniaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Very cool. Thanks for sharing.
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Report this Post11-10-2016 11:26 AM Click Here to See the Profile for darbysanClick Here to Email darbysanSend a Private Message to darbysanEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Very nice work. You mentioned things you learned, or would do differently next time. A list of those things would be of great benefit to those of us that might try this- would help us avoid some of the same issues!! Mine needs some paint work, but this might be an alternative ( if I don't screw it up!)

BTW, I've also got an Elky (85) that I restored years ago to Pro Touring. I was a Director for the National EC Owners Assoc ( elcaminocentral.com - another good site like PFF).

------------------
'87 GT , '00 3800 Series II SC, 4t65e.

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Report this Post11-10-2016 12:37 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by viperine:

Thanks for rekindling my interests in this kind of work, I love how it turned out for you. Do you have any suggested tools that would make this task easiest? I'm guessing a hobby knife, putty knives, scrapers, and possibly a heat gun?


Yeah,
I used two or three plastic squeegees (They look like bondo spatulas) that have felt on one side. Those worked really well.
I also used a couple others that were more rigid, if you have something like a paint can opener but with more of a spoon end it'd help putting the covering behind the edges, of the doors.
It was a lot easier to dismantle the car than do these things on the car, but they can be done on the car.
I'd get an Ove-Glove or something similar if you burn your hands easily. I weld and play with hot stuff a lot so I'm not too sensitive to it.
I used those cheap hobby knives that can be broken off at an angle and extend out from the handle.
I also used x-acto knives but you'll go through blade pretty fast.
Knifless tape is great for the seams and if you want to do a two tone or chrome or carbon fiber section.

Of course you can do like I did on my old sail panels and use carbon fiber but since it just wraps around I didn't need anything fancy on this part.
The acrylic was cracked so I removed it and covered the big section with a piece of matte black vinyl as well.
Also a knife for cutting the roll, it looks like a letter opener, and has the blade inside the body with a slot you can feed the material in through.
That was really great for making big straight cuts on the material.
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Report this Post11-10-2016 12:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by darbysan:

Very nice work. You mentioned things you learned, or would do differently next time. A list of those things would be of great benefit to those of us that might try this- would help us avoid some of the same issues!! Mine needs some paint work, but this might be an alternative ( if I don't screw it up!)

BTW, I've also got an Elky (85) that I restored years ago to Pro Touring. I was a Director for the National EC Owners Assoc ( elcaminocentral.com - another good site like PFF).




I love that site, I used to be very active on Malibu Racing but I stopped being so into drag racing and moved over to LS1Tech when I started my frame off and LS swap on my 78.
This is what it looked like a couple years ago, right before I pulled the body off the frame to repair the floors and stuff.
This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

As for the issues I had wrapping a car:

Get a friend for the big sections.
For instance the rear clip could be done in one piece, but because I was impatient and didn't want to wait for my Dad to have time to come out I did it in three pieces.


Definitely do the jambs if you're changing the color of the car.
I did that on mine (but a little after I'd finished other parts) and it makes a huge improvement.

Always remember to work from the bottom up or back to front when you're going to have a seam.
Luckily I saw that on a video so knew to have all my seams wrap in a way that they'll stay put instead of wanting to peel back with rain or wind.

Sometimes it better to start over than continue messing with a panel.
I did the trunk in two pieces because I'm cheap and didn't want to buy more material and I got half of it done really well, but screwed up the other half so I cut it and had a seam.
I'd be better off to do things all in one go.

Remove trim if you can, its a pain and you may (definitely will) break a clip but its so worth it.

If you end up with needing to make a seam, plan it out very carefully and try to use knifless tape, it'll make the whole process easier.

Watch youtube videos from Oracle and Avery and 3M they have videos posted for their certified installers to watch, they really help and if you listen you'll do better at wrapping.

Last thing: assume you'll mess up. Assume you'll have to buy a little more to get a perfect result.

I'm OK with wrinkles and even the edges lifting in a couple spots because I know I can go back and redo them later.
This isn't a professional wrap job (of course the 300 is a tenth the price I was quoted for a full wrap without the door jambs).

Jessica
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Report this Post11-10-2016 01:50 PM Click Here to See the Profile for darbysanClick Here to Email darbysanSend a Private Message to darbysanEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Thanks for the tips. Definitely thinking about this.

Nice Elky- since you showed yours, I had to show mine

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Report this Post11-10-2016 05:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by darbysan:

Thanks for the tips. Definitely thinking about this.

Nice Elky- since you showed yours, I had to show mine


Nice Elky! I'm going towards a pro touring setup with mine now but the cost of the suspension kits is kind of holding me back.
I already have poly bushing and new balljoints and steering stuff with a high ratio box I redid about 13 years ago.
I'm planning to just put it back together and get it running with the LSx and then redo the suspension at a later time.
I boxed the frame, added rear control arm braces and built triangulated braces for the rear shock tower and front frame horns.
If I lift one corner of the frame three sides come off the ground hahaha, much less bendy for sure.

As for the wrap I did it because it was cheap and I had a lot of trouble justifying spending over a grand on a paint job at this time,
but I didn't want to leave it looking so worn out and old.
Jessica

[This message has been edited by 78_elky (edited 11-10-2016).]

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Report this Post11-14-2016 05:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 85fieroguySend a Private Message to 85fieroguyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Very interesting post. recently saw a Porsche 911 wrapped and was told its $$$$$$. Your idea fits the " Fiero World". QUESTION..you do a wrap, but how do you get it off later??? Thinking of doing my White 85 GT. I would PAY your for a instruction manual on how to do a Fiero.
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Report this Post11-15-2016 11:53 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by 85fieroguy:

Very interesting post. recently saw a Porsche 911 wrapped and was told its $$$$$$. Your idea fits the " Fiero World". QUESTION..you do a wrap, but how do you get it off later??? Thinking of doing my White 85 GT. I would PAY your for a instruction manual on how to do a Fiero.


Like I said above I was quoted $3000-$5000 depending on the type of material, scheme, pattern, etc. I could get a pretty decent Maaco paint job for that kind of money.
As for removal, I've had vinyl on things around my house/garage and it just comes off if you peel it.
A little heat from a hair dryer or heat gun also helps to loosen it up.

A little warning though, I wrapped a rear view mirror and when I took it off it took the paint with it because the paint wasn't very good and it wasn't adhered to the mirror well.
That is a paint issue not a wrap issue though, if the paint is in good shape the wrap works like a protective layer and comes right off.
Now on my Fiero I'll be surprised if it comes off nicely, my paint is pretty old and there are sections with clear coat damage and lots of scratches and chips.

Forgot to mention, I wouldn't even know where to begin with writing a "how to" on this.
If you do decide to wrap your car ask me some specific questions and I can go over areas with you as you get to them.
Maybe we can come up with a how to for it but right now I'm not sure how to do some parts

Jessica

[This message has been edited by 78_elky (edited 11-15-2016).]

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Report this Post11-15-2016 05:09 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 78_elky:

Like I said above I was quoted $3000-$5000 depending on the type of material, scheme, pattern, etc.



3-5 k? You'd be able to get a nice quality near show car if not show car paintjob nothing like Maaco around here.
Glad you did it yourself to save bucks.
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Report this Post11-16-2016 05:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 2.5:


3-5 k? You'd be able to get a nice quality near show car if not show car paintjob nothing like Maaco around here.
Glad you did it yourself to save bucks.


Yeah around here paint jobs are usually pretty spendy; but the wrap places I went to were insane. There is no reason to charge 3K for a single color wrap.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-19-2016 09:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for engine manClick Here to Email engine manSend a Private Message to engine manEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Nice job i just hope i can do my car that well . did you use knife less tape to do seams and did you dry install or wet as i have seen it done both ways on you tube where you able to wrap the bumpers in 1 piece or did you need to do inlays
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Report this Post11-21-2016 12:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by engine man:

Nice job i just hope i can do my car that well . did you use knife less tape to do seams and did you dry install or wet as i have seen it done both ways on you tube where you able to wrap the bumpers in 1 piece or did you need to do inlays


I used knifless tape on the seams, and I did everything dry. I've done parts in the past with solution and its just messy and I didn't feel it was any easier.
I tried to do as much of the pieces cold as possible as well, so I didn't over stretch or overheat the vinyl.
That was sometimes a good thing and other times it just made things harder.
I did the rear bumper in 3 main pieces, after I did around the license plate and reflectors. Its not ideal but it used less material and I was doing it by myself.
The front bumper I'm really not happy with, I had to seam it right down the center so it is in 4 pieces.
Its the one part of the car I really am not proud of, but at least the license plate and emblem break up the front so its not as noticeable.
I may redo the bumpers later if I think I can do a better job on them, they were the most technical parts to wrap.
The spoiler was also tricky, and I should have planned out my seams better on it.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-21-2016 12:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for engine manClick Here to Email engine manSend a Private Message to engine manEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
thank you for the info it really helps i have chrome vinyl and they say it is harder to work with so i will need to get the seams right and i might do black stripes in the center of the car to get rid of some seams and hopefully make it a bit easier
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Report this Post11-21-2016 01:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The chrome is harder to work with, you'll want to use the knifeless tape with it.
Its a lot like the Carbon Fiber I've used for some accents on my car. Its nothing like the other vinyl.
Good luck, and I'm more than willing to try to answer any specific questions you have.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-22-2016 04:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for zmcdonalSend a Private Message to zmcdonalEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 78_elky:


I used knifless tape on the seams, and I did everything dry. I've done parts in the past with solution and its just messy and I didn't feel it was any easier.
I tried to do as much of the pieces cold as possible as well, so I didn't over stretch or overheat the vinyl.
That was sometimes a good thing and other times it just made things harder.
I did the rear bumper in 3 main pieces, after I did around the license plate and reflectors. Its not ideal but it used less material and I was doing it by myself.
The front bumper I'm really not happy with, I had to seam it right down the center so it is in 4 pieces.
Its the one part of the car I really am not proud of, but at least the license plate and emblem break up the front so its not as noticeable.
I may redo the bumpers later if I think I can do a better job on them, they were the most technical parts to wrap.
The spoiler was also tricky, and I should have planned out my seams better on it.
Jessica


Here are some pics of how I tackled my front bumper. The seams are very well hidden, most people don't know it's not one piece until I tell them and start pointing out how how the different pieces come together. I am by no means a professional, but I am very proud of how nicely my bumper turned out.

 
quote
Originally posted by zmcdonal:














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Report this Post11-22-2016 04:50 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
That looks really good, I like how yours turned out. I know on mine I was trying to use so little material to save money it bit me.
I wanted to get away with only using 15" or 20" of material to do the front, because I didn't wrap my ground effects.
I may revisit the bumpers at a later date (maybe next summer) after I see how the wrap survives the winter.
I'd also like to fill the Pontiac logo on the rear bumper like I did with my headlight door and then re wrap the bumper.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-22-2016 05:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for zmcdonalSend a Private Message to zmcdonalEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by 78_elky:

That looks really good, I like how yours turned out. I know on mine I was trying to use so little material to save money it bit me.
I wanted to get away with only using 15" or 20" of material to do the front, because I didn't wrap my ground effects.
I may revisit the bumpers at a later date (maybe next summer) after I see how the wrap survives the winter.
I'd also like to fill the Pontiac logo on the rear bumper like I did with my headlight door and then re wrap the bumper.
Jessica


I think I used a 30" wide section to do the top portion of the bumper. You might be able to use a 86-88GT fastback bumper since they didn't an embossed PONTIAC logo in them, not sure if there would be any issues with doing that but it would save a lot of bodywork.

CORRECTION: Changing the bumper wouldn't be a good solution. I just looked at your pics again and noticed you have the ribbed trim for the belt line of your car, an 86-88 fastback would have the smooth trim molded into the bumper.

[This message has been edited by zmcdonal (edited 11-22-2016).]

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Report this Post11-22-2016 05:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 78_elkySend a Private Message to 78_elkyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
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Originally posted by zmcdonal:


I think I used a 30" wide section to do the top portion of the bumper. You might be able to use a 86-88GT fastback bumper since they didn't an embossed PONTIAC logo in them, not sure if there would be any issues with doing that but it would save a lot of bodywork.

CORRECTION: Changing the bumper wouldn't be a good solution. I just looked at your pics again and noticed you have the ribbed trim for the belt line of your car, an 86-88 fastback would have the smooth trim molded into the bumper.



Yeah those darn belt moldings on the cars makes things a little bit of a pain. I'll just fill the bumper at some point, who knows maybe I'll fix some of the other issues with the body work while I'm at it.
Jessica
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Report this Post11-22-2016 06:30 PM Click Here to See the Profile for engine manClick Here to Email engine manSend a Private Message to engine manEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
zmcdonal did you use knifeless tape on the seams as every time i use it i don't get a real clean cut i get a cleaner cut line using a knife so far
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