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What is the best way to get that ribbing off of the Auto transmission cooling lines by hcforde
Started on: 12-11-2017 08:06 PM
Replies: 9 (416 views)
Last post by: hcforde on 12-13-2017 08:54 PM
hcforde
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Report this Post12-11-2017 08:06 PM Click Here to See the Profile for hcfordeClick Here to Email hcfordeSend a Private Message to hcfordeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I have a leak in one of my 1988 GT's automatic transmission lines by the driver side door. So I need to cut it, and splice it with a gator gripper compression fitting OR flare and put on some flexible Transmission tubing This ribbing on it is rusty and I need to get it out of the way for the splice. any ideas and still keep it round?
The hole occurred when it was jacked up to replace a fuel pump. it did not rust through. Had it rusted through I would be looking for other options.
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olejoedad
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Report this Post12-12-2017 09:01 AM Click Here to See the Profile for olejoedadClick Here to Email olejoedadSend a Private Message to olejoedadEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Cut the line where you need to repair it.
Stretch the coiled stone guard wire to lengthen it and then cut it with a cut-off wheel/die grinder.
Install your flare fitting pieces.
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hcforde
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Report this Post12-12-2017 03:12 PM Click Here to See the Profile for hcfordeClick Here to Email hcfordeSend a Private Message to hcfordeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
OK, so it is basically just a coiled wire piece that is not fastened to the line in any way.

Thanks

 
quote
Originally posted by olejoedad:

Cut the line where you need to repair it.
Stretch the coiled stone guard wire to lengthen it and then cut it with a cut-off wheel/die grinder.
Install your flare fitting pieces.


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olejoedad
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Report this Post12-12-2017 05:37 PM Click Here to See the Profile for olejoedadClick Here to Email olejoedadSend a Private Message to olejoedadEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Yup, just coiled wire to protect the metal tubing from stone damage.
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hcforde
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Report this Post12-12-2017 08:32 PM Click Here to See the Profile for hcfordeClick Here to Email hcfordeSend a Private Message to hcfordeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
OK thanks, I seems to me that when these coils start to rust and corrode they will retain moisture and hold it against the transmission cooling lines promoting rusting of the lines. Are these lines made of steel, or a non-rusting metal?

I am going to use a CF3 Gator Gripper compression fitting no flaring is necessary. http://agscompany.com/produ...ion-union-516-10bag/ I was also considering automatic transmission rated rubber hose. Doing a slight double flare so the ends of the tubing would not eat into the hose. HOWEVER, doing 2 of those while still attached under a car seems like a lot of work.
 
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Originally posted by olejoedad:

Yup, just coiled wire to protect the metal tubing from stone damage.


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Report this Post12-12-2017 11:36 PM Click Here to See the Profile for olejoedadClick Here to Email olejoedadSend a Private Message to olejoedadEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The lines are steel, be careful not to crack the compression nut while trying to tighten the fitting enough to seat the ferrule on the steel line.
The fittings in your link are for aluminum, brass and copper lines.
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Mickey_Moose
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Report this Post12-13-2017 01:48 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Mickey_MooseClick Here to visit Mickey_Moose's HomePageClick Here to Email Mickey_MooseSend a Private Message to Mickey_MooseEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by olejoedad:

The lines are steel, be careful not to crack the compression nut while trying to tighten the fitting enough to seat the ferrule on the steel line.
The fittings in your link are for aluminum, brass and copper lines.


What he said - actually I would use a stainless steel Swagelok fitting myself.
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hcforde
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Report this Post12-13-2017 06:34 PM Click Here to See the Profile for hcfordeClick Here to Email hcfordeSend a Private Message to hcfordeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
You just want to get into my pocket deeper huh, LOL!!! What would be the advantage of stainless over brass there is only about 20PSI from what I understand, these are rated to 200PSI.

 
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Originally posted by Mickey_Moose:


What he said - actually I would use a stainless steel Swagelok fitting myself.


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Report this Post12-13-2017 07:50 PM Click Here to See the Profile for olejoedadClick Here to Email olejoedadSend a Private Message to olejoedadEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by olejoedad:

(snip) be careful not to crack the compression nut while trying to tighten the fitting enough to seat the ferrule on the steel line. (snip)


Because the brass nut can crack before the ferrule seals.......
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hcforde
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Report this Post12-13-2017 08:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for hcfordeClick Here to Email hcfordeSend a Private Message to hcfordeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
OK, but I have a fix for that(you guys are going to love this, I found it on youtube. You put superglue on the fittings, and anywhere there could be a potential leak, then quickly put baking soda on the area. continue to layer the superglue and baking soda 3-4 times, LOL! It actually worked on a radiator that had a crack in it . I could pay 3 times the amount and get it fixed immediately, or buy a radiator off of Amazom and wait a few days. After i got the radiator I continued to use the car to see how long it would last. I was astounded it lasted 12 days. This was in a Toyota Sequoia.

NO!!! I am not going to do that, a transmission is a whole lot more difficult to change than a radiator. And the radiator has a temp gauge, the trans does not.
 
quote
Originally posted by olejoedad:


Because the brass nut can crack before the ferrule seals.......


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