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Auto/Fiero painting tutorial part 2 parts painting by mark1970
Started on: 09-04-2013 09:58 PM
Replies: 5 (471 views)
Last post by: rogergarrison on 09-05-2013 05:49 PM
mark1970
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Report this Post09-04-2013 09:58 PM Click Here to See the Profile for mark1970Click Here to Email mark1970Send a Private Message to mark1970Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
This past weekend I worked on two projects... the first was repaint some parts on a friends car. door mirrors, roof and door molding in silver met. base coat/clear coal urethane and hi solids clear....



the first thing we did was get the car in the booth, i am lucky enough to have a booth to use... next is too use wax and grease remover to wipe all the areas to be painted and around them to help the tape stick good for masking, cleaning the areas prior to sanding is a good idea so not to grind and contaminates into the material being painted....



next masking.... first start using 1/2 to 3/4 tape i used good reg tan tape for better grip as it is over the oem finish. apply the tape around all parts to be painted then tape your masking material to the tape already applied in this case i used masking plastic for auto masking, do not just use any plastic sheeting as the paint may not stick and blow off during spraying coats and all over your work...



next scuff areas to be painted i used 400 grit paper as some areas needed to be smoothed out next rewipe and dry with wax and grease remover

then we used a 2k urethane hi fill primer/sealer at a mix ratio at 4 parts primer one part hardener and one part reducer to seal the areas prior to paint



we then applied one medium wet coat to all areas and let it flash /dry for one hour as per manufacture tech sheet







next we had lunch subs from Wawa

next was time for the base coat, mixed one part BC to one part urethane reducer per manufacture sheet... applied two light to medium wet coats , you only need to apply enough BC to cover/hide/color... with 10mins flash time between coats. then apply the clear after 20-30min flash time depending on air temp.

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the bc will be dull when dry

next we applied the hi solids clear coat using Tamco 7677 clear at 4 parts paint one part hardener no reducer needed, applied two med wet coats with 15min flash between coats...





then we cleaned up the shop and went home... the next morning we un-masked the car

all the products used where from Tamco Paint and worked great perfect color match to the oem color and beautiful clear it when on like glass smooth and vary hi gloss
i will try and get a few pics of the car outside to post

in a few days i will have a write up on a blast, epoxy prime and satin black paint on a v6 air cleaner, so stay tuned... thank you
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rogergarrison
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Report this Post09-05-2013 10:11 AM Click Here to See the Profile for rogergarrisonClick Here to Email rogergarrisonSend a Private Message to rogergarrisonEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Good write up.

I do have a question though. In 50 years as a professional auto painter/ shop owner Ive never heard of urathane clear referred to as high solid. Basecoat colors being high solid means its mostly pigment with very little if any clear in the mix and covers fast and easily. Single stage and older paints had mix formulas that were mostly clear with a small degree of pigment mixed in. Colors like silver were almost transparent and required lots of coats where newer high solid colors almost completely cover in 1 or 2 coats because its almost all color with no clear. One particular color I can remember is the Bronze on 57 chevys. It would not ever cover a primered spot even with lots of coats...you had to prime the whole panel to keep a spot from showing thru. A lot of colors on newer Corvettes have to be painted white or gray before a color coat to get it correct. This is especially true on yellow and Anniversary Red. Since clear has no pigment, it really cant have a high degree of solids. Not an argument, just wonder why you call it that... Are schools calling it that ?

[This message has been edited by rogergarrison (edited 09-05-2013).]

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tesmith66
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Report this Post09-05-2013 10:38 AM Click Here to See the Profile for tesmith66Send a Private Message to tesmith66Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Doesn't high solids mean low VOC's (volatile organic compounds) as in less solvents and more product by volume? Isn't it for less waste and lower emissions?
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mark1970
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Report this Post09-05-2013 10:55 AM Click Here to See the Profile for mark1970Click Here to Email mark1970Send a Private Message to mark1970Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
[b]Originally posted by rogergarrison:[/

Good write up.

I do have a question though. In 50 years as a professional auto painter/ shop owner Ive never heard of urathane clear referred to as high solid. Basecoat colors being high solid means its mostly pigment with very little if any clear in the mix and covers fast and easily. Single stage and older paints had mix formulas that were mostly clear with a small degree of pigment mixed in. Colors like silver were almost transparent and required lots of coats where newer high solid colors almost completely cover in 1 or 2 coats because its almost all color with no clear. One particular color I can remember is the Bronze on 57 chevys. It would not ever cover a primered spot even with lots of coats...you had to prime the whole panel to keep a spot from showing thru. A lot of colors on newer Corvettes have to be painted white or gray before a color coat to get it correct. This is especially true on yellow and Anniversary Red. Since clear has no pigment, it really cant have a high degree of solids. Not an argument, just wonder why you call it that... Are schools calling it that ?



Thank you, hi solids is more paint/clear in this case and less solvents, this clear as I believe 46% solids by volume nnot including the hardener which I would have too double check but believe to be 50+% solids so less die back less coats etc. if you visit Tamcos website you can compare the different solids content of different clears and also look at your data sheets for product s you use

[This message has been edited by mark1970 (edited 09-05-2013).]

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mark1970
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Report this Post09-05-2013 11:48 AM Click Here to See the Profile for mark1970Click Here to Email mark1970Send a Private Message to mark1970Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
VOCs are the types of solvents in the paint material in low voc paint as a2.1 some of the hi voc solvents have been replaced with lower voc solvents such as acetone to make the compliant. The solids are the resins not solvents . Solvents evaporate, solids resins don't

 
quote
Originally posted by tesmith66:

Doesn't high solids mean low VOC's (volatile organic compounds) as in less solvents and more product by volume? Isn't it for less waste and lower emissions?

[This message has been edited by mark1970 (edited 09-05-2013).]

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rogergarrison
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Report this Post09-05-2013 05:49 PM Click Here to See the Profile for rogergarrisonClick Here to Email rogergarrisonSend a Private Message to rogergarrisonEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I may have been going for years with a misconception then. Your saying 'high solids' refers to more material and less reduction, rather than more color pigment in a given size can of color ? Anotherwords, high solids is shot thicker...? I do know that most urathane clears a 4 parts clear to 1 part of hardener (my brands use no reducer) and older paints like acrylic enamel and lacquer were reduced as much as 50-100% to spray, so newer is in fact shot at a thicker consistencey.
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