Pennock's Fiero Forum
  Totally O/T - Archive
  non-fiero related emissions question

T H I S   I S   A N   A R C H I V E D   T O P I C
  

Email This Page to Someone! | Printable Version


non-fiero related emissions question by fiero56
Started on: 07-25-2000 02:36 PM
Replies: 9
Last post by: Raydar on 08-04-2000 01:33 AM
fiero56
Member
Posts: 4144
From:
Registered: Sep 1999


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post07-25-2000 02:36 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fiero56Send a Private Message to fiero56Direct Link to This Post
Have an older mustang 4-cyl, auto. I took it to have e-check performed and it failed the CO(carbon monoxide) on both idle and loaded. Idle failed by 3/100 and loaded failed by 36/100.
This car is not F/I, and has no computer system. Just lots of vacume lines, and a CAT. What causes higher CO emissions, and what can be done to help it pass?
IP: Logged
PFF
System Bot
Phil
Member
Posts: 7030
From: Coventry, RI
Registered: Apr 99


Feedback score: (2)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 154
Rate this member

Report this Post07-25-2000 03:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PhilClick Here to Email PhilSend a Private Message to PhilDirect Link to This Post
Hi-test gas and a can of octane booster-no joke
IP: Logged
gixxer
Member
Posts: 451
From: Kent, Wa. USA
Registered: Mar 2000


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post07-25-2000 07:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for gixxerClick Here to Email gixxerSend a Private Message to gixxerDirect Link to This Post
Here's info from a book:"CO is produced when there isn't enough oxygen to complete the combustion process. In general terms it is correct to say the richer the mixture, the higher the levels of CO. However, even when the air/fuel mix is at the stoichiometric or chemically correct ratio of 14.7;1, carbon monoxide will be formed due to non-uniform (fuel)droplet sizes, cylinder to cylinder distribution differences, scavenging differences, and combustion differences".
So check your float level and blow the carbon out of that engine.
IP: Logged
Patrick
Member
Posts: 31663
From: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Registered: Apr 99


Feedback score: (1)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 446
Rate this member

Report this Post07-25-2000 10:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickDirect Link to This Post

I've tried Phil's suggestion in the past and it's never worked for me. However, what HAS worked is to take the air filter element out (just for the test). With a non-computerized engine, removing the filter helps to lean out the mixture. You can also put a LOT of air in the drive-wheel tires to lower the rolling resistance (again, just for the test). Of course, if there's some real bad mechanical problems, no number of shortcuts are going to help.

[This message has been edited by Patrick (edited 07-26-2000).]

IP: Logged
Patrick
Member
Posts: 31663
From: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Registered: Apr 99


Feedback score: (1)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 446
Rate this member

Report this Post07-26-2000 12:01 AM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickDirect Link to This Post
Here's some info from a Monza internet site. Grab a coffee and start reading...
 
quote
In order of time/money required:
* Have the car tested after it's warmed up. The warm engine will
burn the fuel/air mixture better than a cold one. Many cars will
dump extra fuel into engine when they're cold to help them run better
until the engine warms up.
* Use high-grade gas. Try a fuel system cleaner. This will help prevent
an engine miss, in which the fuel/air mixture isn't burnt and is
dumped directly out the exhaust.
* Change the air filter. A clogged filter can limit the air your
engine is getting, making your air/fuel mixture too rich.
* Change the oil. If you're burning oil, contaminants in the oil
make the problem worse.
* Check the ignition timing. Again, this will help prevent engine misses.
Also, if the timing is too advanced, you might not be burning all
of the air/fuel mixture before it gets blown out the exhaust.
See Robert's notes below.
* Change spark plugs, wires, distributor cap and rotor, again, to
help prevent engine misses. Make sure the vacuum advance is
working correctly.
* Fix vacuum leaks. They can cause all sorts of havoc.
* Make sure the carb isn't dumping too much fuel into the engine--
this could be due to a number of reasons, for example, leaking
from the bowl, wrong carburetor, etc.
* Test and fix emissions equipment. A properly tuned engine stands
a good chance of passing emissions even without the right equipment,
so that's why I put it so far down on this list. But if it's
broken or missing, there can be problems (also the inspector might
fail you for missing or broken pieces). Check PCV and EGR valves.
* Replace catalytic convertor. See Robert's notes below.
* Check for and fix engine damage or modifications. Look at the
valvetrain, camshaft, and piston rings. A radical cam will let
unburned air/fuel into the exhaust, which is bad (for emissions,
but not necessarily bad for performance). Burnt valves won't
seal correctly, allowing unburnt fuel/air into the exhaust.
Worn piston rings will allow oil into the combustion chamber,
letting burnt oil into the exhaust. A stretched timing chain will
mess up valve timing, which will affect emissions.

Robert Herndon, a licensed California Smog Technician, writes:
"When an engine is producing too much "CO's" it is ingesting too much fuel.
High "HC's" indicate how the engine is burning the fuel. Common causes of
high HC's are Engine Miss, Burnt Valve or a Vaccum Leak. If the valves are
in good shape, compression is even and you have no vacuum leaks, you may
retard the timing to effect a change in HC emissions. However, in
California, you may only reduce the ignition timing 2 degrees either side
of the manufacturers specifications. One other cause of high HC production
is a faulty Catalytic Converter. Check exhaust pipe temperature in front of
and behind the Cat. You should have several hundred degress higher
temperature behind the Cat compared to your reading in front of the Cat. An
example would be 350 degress in front and 600 degrees after the Cat."

Hopefully there's something there that will help.
IP: Logged
Oreif
Member
Posts: 16460
From: Schaumburg, IL
Registered: Jan 2000


Feedback score:    (19)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 442
Rate this member

Report this Post07-26-2000 01:33 AM Click Here to See the Profile for OreifClick Here to visit Oreif's HomePageClick Here to Email OreifSend a Private Message to OreifDirect Link to This Post
You don't say what year Mustang, But does it have the old style A.I.R. pump on it? If it does the inlet filter can be removed and rinsed out with water and Dawn dish soap. The old AIR pumps were used to pump air into the exhaust to aid the catalytic converter. If filter is clogged this will cause you to fail.

------------------

IP: Logged
olympic
Member
Posts: 544
From: Saskatchewan,Canada
Registered: Oct 1999


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post07-26-2000 02:13 AM Click Here to See the Profile for olympicClick Here to Email olympicSend a Private Message to olympicDirect Link to This Post
Most people claim that ethanol blended gas really reduces emissions.

------------------
Your best...??? Losers whine about doing their best. Winners go home and f*** the prom queen! - Sean Connery in "The Rock"

IP: Logged
fiero56
Member
Posts: 4144
From:
Registered: Sep 1999


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post07-26-2000 08:44 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fiero56Send a Private Message to fiero56Direct Link to This Post
We bought the car about a month ago, and since it had been sitting for near a year before we bought it, I decided to burn out all that stale gas, and run a cleaner through it before e-check. All filters have been changed, oil is new and clean, timing is perfect, plugs, cap, rotor, wires, all new, everything looks good. No nasty exhaust smells, doesn't appear to be burning anything. All cylinders have VERY good compression, I will try a higher grade gas, first, and report.
IP: Logged
fiero56
Member
Posts: 4144
From:
Registered: Sep 1999


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post08-04-2000 12:33 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fiero56Send a Private Message to fiero56Direct Link to This Post
Well, I finally got a chance to take that ol' mustang back to e-check today. All I did was put 93 octane and a bottle of octane boost in the other day. The new certificate says "PASS"(haha! victory!!!)and shows that emmisions are cut 70% from the first two attempts. I changed nothing else. I can't believe it worked, but it did. Good tip Phil. Now, hopefully the Fiero passes when I finally get around to it later this month.
IP: Logged
Raydar
Member
Posts: 38922
From: Carrollton GA. Out in the... country.
Registered: Oct 1999


Feedback score:    (12)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 455
Rate this member

Report this Post08-04-2000 01:33 AM Click Here to See the Profile for RaydarClick Here to Email RaydarSend a Private Message to RaydarDirect Link to This Post
Oh man! Am I gonna remember THAT one!
Good call, Phil.

------------------
Raydar
88 Formula T-Top
88 Coupe (ISO big V-6)

"Some mornings, it just isn't worth
chewing through the restraints."

IP: Logged



All times are ET (US)

T H I S   I S   A N   A R C H I V E D   T O P I C
  

Contact Us | Back To Main Page

Advertizing on PFF | Fiero Parts Vendors
PFF Merchandise | Fiero Gallery | Ogre's Cave
Real-Time Chat | Fiero Related Auctions on eBay



Copyright (c) 1999, C. Pennock