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True dual exhaust is it possible ??? by pontiacfierokid1985
Started on: 01-11-2011 11:09 PM
Replies: 193 (5744 views)
Last post by: Hairold on 07-19-2013 01:00 PM
carbon
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Report this Post07-03-2013 09:32 AM Click Here to See the Profile for carbonSend a Private Message to carbonEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Will:


You're welcome.
A significant amount of the body of knowledge regarding transmission lines is applicable to header design. That's why I kept referring to the impedance of the pipe to the propagation of the sound wave.
If you're in electrical engineering, take a course in transmission lines and microwave/RF techniques. When I was in college for Physics, I did this based on the recommendation of an old electrical engineer I worked with during my summer job at the Naval Research Lab. The course was very helpful in giving a practical background to the generalized discussion of fields, as well as a solid understanding of wave mechanics.

Basically, my entire argument could be summarized by this graphic:



From the time domain reflectometer article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wik...domain_reflectometer


So true. I went to school for EET and I recently started working on audiometry equipment. I had to mention to the audiologist, who was giving me a primer in tympanography, that she already knew all the math she needed to be an RF engineer. It's all physics.
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Report this Post07-04-2013 11:29 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Will:


You're welcome.
A significant amount of the body of knowledge regarding transmission lines is applicable to header design. That's why I kept referring to the impedance of the pipe to the propagation of the sound wave.
If you're in electrical engineering, take a course in transmission lines and microwave/RF techniques. When I was in college for Physics, I did this based on the recommendation of an old electrical engineer I worked with during my summer job at the Naval Research Lab. The course was very helpful in giving a practical background to the generalized discussion of fields, as well as a solid understanding of wave mechanics.

Basically, my entire argument could be summarized by this graphic:



From the time domain reflectometer article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wik...domain_reflectometer


This link has got nothing to do with the subject of creating a true dual exhaust. It is an electronics article.

 
quote

A time-domain reflectometer (TDR) is an electronic instrument used to characterize and locate faults in metallic cables (for example, twisted wire pairs, coaxial cables).[1] It can also be used to locate discontinuities in a connector, printed circuit board, or any other electrical path. The equivalent device for optical fiber is an optical time-domain reflectometer.


If anybody wants to, or is interested in a true dual system to improve their performance, they won't benefit one iota from an electronics discussion or illustrations concerning "Signal transmitted through and reflected from a discontinuity".

This is a discussion about how to evacuate hot gases down a tube. It is concerning pneumatics, not electronics.

The formula's used by the racing community are well documented and understood over decades of racing technology development.

The formula's I have posted are entirely adequate for determining the best piping on a v6.

If you guys want to start a thread about electronic pulses and locating faults in cables, please feel free. In short, you are ruining a perfectly good discussion on exhaust. Please just delete your electronic posts and keep the subject focussed.

Thanks,

Arn
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Report this Post07-04-2013 01:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:
The formula's used by the racing community are well documented and understood over decades of racing technology development.


Wait. Are we talking about Fieros, or are we talking about race cars?
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Report this Post07-04-2013 02:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The applications are different, but the technology the same. A race car doesn't have to meet the same noise bylaws in most jurisdictions, but the exhaust theory is exactly the same.

After all, look at the advertisements the car makers do based on "track results".

I still put it to you that talking about electronics applications is way off subject and somewhat misleading.

Arn
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Report this Post07-04-2013 08:56 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:
The applications are different, but the technology the same. A race car doesn't have to meet the same noise bylaws in most jurisdictions, but the exhaust theory is exactly the same.

After all, look at the advertisements the car makers do based on "track results".

I still put it to you that talking about electronics applications is way off subject and somewhat misleading.


Not only noise laws, but also emissions. And yes, the basic technology is the same for exhaust an internal combustion engines, whether it's on a street car, a race car, airplane or tractor trailer. But the same as you wouldn't base your exhaust design off a P-51 Mustang, you shouldn't use the exhaust for a race car on a street engine. A race engine, and a street engine, are designed and built for entirely different applications, have different optimal operating ranges, and run at different peak efficiencies. Just because you copied what someone else did on a wholly different application, doesn't mean it will work the same on yours.

And the electronics comments are completely relevant. You simply do not understand the statements made, or how they relate, and thus assume they do not. They're not discussions about design of some electronic circuit. They are comments about waves and reflection. The same basic principles apply.
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Report this Post07-05-2013 08:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for carbonSend a Private Message to carbonEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by dobey:
And the electronics comments are completely relevant. You simply do not understand the statements made, or how they relate, and thus assume they do not. They're not discussions about design of some electronic circuit. They are comments about waves and reflection. The same basic principles apply.


Yup.

Voltage=Pressure
Current=Flow
Impedance=Restriction

It is all very relevant. Reversion in an exhaust system has very much in common with reflection in a transmission cable. It's physics. It's always a good thing to use an example that is familiar to someone when trying to explain a system. If someone has no concept of how electricity works, then using an example of a garden hose and valve to describe the flow of water is very useful, although seemingly irrelevant.

Edit: Replaced resistance with impedance, because stuff is never that simple in the real world.

[This message has been edited by carbon (edited 07-05-2013).]

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Report this Post07-05-2013 09:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Carbon, you are ignoring the obvious.

For theoretical discussion you could make those comparisons, but, a lbs/sq/in pulse moves molecules, not electrons, or microns.

The molecules have kinetic energy.

When voltage is in a line, you have no vacuum. When an audio signal reaches your radio or television it has no explosive force.

In short, a circuit sits there silently running. A pressurized force causes vibration, noise and movement.

The comparisons to electronics is a distraction and detracts from constructive conversation about exhaust

Arn
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Report this Post07-05-2013 10:48 AM Click Here to See the Profile for carbonSend a Private Message to carbonEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

Carbon, you are ignoring the obvious.

When voltage is in a line, you have no vacuum. When an audio signal reaches your radio or television it has no explosive force.

In short, a circuit sits there silently running.

Arn


And you have nothing but a basic grasp of electronics/RF if you think that, so we'll call it good, I guess.
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Report this Post07-05-2013 11:15 AM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

Carbon, you are ignoring the obvious.

For theoretical discussion you could make those comparisons, but, a lbs/sq/in pulse moves molecules, not electrons, or microns.

The molecules have kinetic energy.

When voltage is in a line, you have no vacuum. When an audio signal reaches your radio or television it has no explosive force.

In short, a circuit sits there silently running. A pressurized force causes vibration, noise and movement.

The comparisons to electronics is a distraction and detracts from constructive conversation about exhaust


LOL. I wish my electronics were silent. I can hear it running through the walls, flowing through the liquid crystals in my monitors, as I type this.

The only detraction from constructive conversation about exhaust is your constant insistence that the comments are a detraction; because you don't understand them. The principles are exactly the same. It's basic physics, not quantum mechanics (which would be mostly irrelevant here).

There is already turbulence in the exhaust, before it even exits the head, because the head and exhaust valve are not a perfectly concentric cylinder, or in some cases even close to being a cylinder. And then, as soon as you exit the head, the primary tubes have up to a 90 degree bend in the exhaust. It's not a perfectly straight cylinder. So, part of the gas is going to slam into the opposing wall.

BTW, what numbers did you plug into that formula exactly? Because I just put in the numbers for a stock 2.8, and it tells me 15.6" long primaries. That's a far cry from 36" primaries. Even with tiny 1" primaries, it says 31.5" long. So you have smaller primaries than that, or a cam with an extremely long exhaust duration?
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Report this Post07-05-2013 01:58 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
My 2.8 was a 2.9. And the 2.8 calculation will be different. However, your calculation is wrong. You have somehow come up with a length (what pipe size I don't know) which makes no sense.

Arn
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Report this Post07-05-2013 02:15 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

My 2.8 was a 2.9. And the 2.8 calculation will be different. However, your calculation is wrong. You have somehow come up with a length (what pipe size I don't know) which makes no sense.


code:

( 216 (duration) * 3.5 (bore) * 3.0 (stroke) )^2
-------------------------------------------------- * 12 =~ 15.6 inches
( 1440 (const) * 1.42 (ex valve diam) )^2



That is the formula you posted, and those are the values for a stock 2.8. A 2.9, or even a 3.4, would not make so big a difference.
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Report this Post07-05-2013 03:00 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
OK so let's take this example.

73 mm bore
89mm stroke
exhaust period 230 degrees
valve port 1.156 in.

The formula is then A = 230
S = 3.56 in.
D =2.9 in
d = 1.156 in.

The formula is therefore ASD(sq) divided by 1400 d(sq)

Pipe length is 230x3.56x 8.41 divided by 1,400 x 1.34 = 3.68 ft. (really long)

On my engine

A= 214
S= 76mmm (2.99")
D=89mm (3.5")
d= 1.42"

I assumed 1.5" ID pipe as being closest to the 1.42 valve opening. It came out to 33" but with a 218 degree cam it went to 34".

Given the space difficulties, I could not make both banks exactly to the formula, however I was within an inch.

I can tell you that anything in the 32" to 34" range is likely close enough. If you drop below 22" you will lose scavenging almost all together. Your scavenging kicks in at increasingly lower rpm ranges the longer the pipe, provided the pipe is not too long. The reason is that the slower the rpm, the longer the interval between pulses.

Incidentally, all the header manufacturers for this size of cylinder use 1.5" pipe, but I have seen 1.25" used.

Hope this helps.

Arn
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Report this Post07-05-2013 04:57 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Arn, can you please take a picture of the formula directly from the book? I don't have it, and the city library doesn't seem to have it. If I buy it, it will take some time to get here as well, as there's no eBook version, so I can't just buy it on my Kindle.

The image you originally posted, and your textual copy of the formula, seem to contradict with how you're using it. The exact image from the book, and the sentence or two describing the variables would be much more helpful I think. I tried to find it online, but I can't seem to find it anywhere, using multiple search engines.

Thanks.
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Report this Post07-05-2013 06:41 PM Click Here to See the Profile for WillClick Here to Email WillSend a Private Message to WillEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

The applications are different, but the technology the same.


You're soooooo close to the Ah-ha moment...

The mathematics of wave mechanics applies to ALL WAVES. An open pipe in acoustics is an open circuit termination on an RF transmission line, and a closed pipe is a short circuit termination. The mathematics describing the systems is THE SAME.

Time domain reflectometry is simply more common in RF than acoustics, although reflection seismology is close to the same technique. Radar and sonar are the same... Once you see the beauty, symmetry and elegance of the mathematics, your mind will be blown.

You see the commonality among different automotive applications... you just need to take a few more steps back so you see the commonality between the science that makes the automotive applications work and the science that makes the other applications work.

Or not... my car won't be any slower.

[This message has been edited by Will (edited 07-05-2013).]

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Report this Post07-05-2013 07:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for WillClick Here to Email WillSend a Private Message to WillEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

OK so let's take this example.

73 mm bore
89mm stroke


Backwards from a 2.8
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Arns85GT
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Report this Post07-05-2013 07:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Will, please give me more credit. I understand already.

The issue is that simply studying wave logarithms will not get you to where you need to be in exhaust design.

You are dealing with something akin to live steam. It is a pressure/vacuum situation.

I agree you can see a wave pattern, but that wave pattern is only part of the issue. The other parts are dynamics associated with pressure and heat.

When I give information, yes, I've read about it the same as you. In this case I am quoting work by Philip C. Smith, C.Eng.Mech.E., M.S.A.E. and John C. Morrison, B.Sc., Ph.D., C.Eng., M.I. Mech.E.

These guys are way ahead of both of us. This work has been known science since the early 60's.

It is reference material used by the major car manufacturers, and race car designers.

The gif you posted shows in mathematical terms the pulse and resulting vacuum, but it does not capture the whole dynamic.

For instance, you need to keep the pipes hot because hot gas travels faster than cool gas. Wrapping pipes keeps the heat in, keeping your engine temps down and keeping your escaping gases hotter.

When we discuss exhausts, very few gear heads care about the mathematical equations but care big time about the other factors, like hp, torque, and physical design.

So far, I've only seen good design from myself and Asterix. I hope I can see some more. Another good one, and a pioneer is Trueleo, which work I highly respect. BTW my 4.9 exhaust is not optimum design, it is pocketbook function

Arn
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Report this Post07-05-2013 07:10 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Arns85GT

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Member since Jul 2003
 
quote
Originally posted by dobey:

Arn, can you please take a picture of the formula directly from the book?

Thanks.


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Report this Post07-05-2013 08:40 PM Click Here to See the Profile for AsterixClick Here to visit Asterix's HomePageSend a Private Message to AsterixEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I elected to fabricate from scratch because I was unable to find a Trueleo exhaust and Arn's wouldn't fit with the 4T60 trans. FWIW, the engine was test fitted by thedrue a few days ago and there are no clearance issues.
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Report this Post07-05-2013 10:03 PM Click Here to See the Profile for WillClick Here to Email WillSend a Private Message to WillEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

Will, please give me more credit. I understand already.

The issue is that simply studying wave logarithms will not get you to where you need to be in exhaust design.


Logarithms don't have much to do with wave mechanics.

 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:
You are dealing with something akin to live steam. It is a pressure/vacuum situation.


What is a "live stream"?
I'm reminded of the episode of X-files where Scully asks Mulder to define "The Whammy"

 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:
I agree you can see a wave pattern, but that wave pattern is only part of the issue. The other parts are dynamics associated with pressure and heat.


 
quote
Originally posted by Will:
There are two different phenomena that operate simultaneously. BOTH have been proven and are commonly accepted.


Hmm....

What makes a good header hasn't changed since the '60's, but our ability to understand it via analytical techniques has advanced significantly.

Anyway...

You said this:
 
quote
Originally posted by Will:





Does not happen. Still think so?

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Arns85GT
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Report this Post07-06-2013 11:48 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
LOL "Live steam"

Anyway, your two dimensional illustration does not and cannot illustrate a dynamic pressure pulse.

It does show a return negative pulse, but, it is not the same as a vacuum following a high pressure.

There are so many forces at work that a simple equation is not possible to illustrate the movement.

What we need in the discussion is the input from somebody who knows pressure vessels and piping.

I don't think anybody on this thread is a mechanical engineer, or stationary engineer.

High pressure is not the same as an electronic pulse. The electronic pulse has no psi. involved and it is not moving molecules. Different animal IMHO

Arn
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Report this Post07-06-2013 05:28 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Zac88GTClick Here to visit Zac88GT's HomePageClick Here to Email Zac88GTSend a Private Message to Zac88GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:
I don't think anybody on this thread is a mechanical engineer, or stationary engineer.

High pressure is not the same as an electronic pulse. The electronic pulse has no psi. involved and it is not moving molecules. Different animal IMHO

Arn


You've obviously overlooked Wills credentials.
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Report this Post07-06-2013 06:07 PM Click Here to See the Profile for JamesCurtisClick Here to Email JamesCurtisSend a Private Message to JamesCurtisEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Zac88GT:


You've obviously overlooked Wills credentials.


That's not all he's overlooking. It's fun watching an argument from the two perspectives. One side coming from a person who has "Read a book" and the other having a degree in engineering and physics trying to explain to the first person why what he read in the book works. This argument is almost as frustrating to watch as a religious debate.

This conversation may not have anything to do with the original post but do take into consideration that the first post was at the beginning of 2011. I have enjoyed following this tangent!
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Report this Post07-06-2013 07:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Zac88GT:


You've obviously overlooked Wills credentials.


I don't think Will is saying he is a mechanical engineer. His expertise he is stating is electronic.

I am quoting guys with mechanical engineering backgrounds.

Will is very knowledgable. He also explains his positions very well. I respect his positions. I simply disagree that electrical calculations and related mathematical equations can account for the dynamics of high pressure.

The mechanical engineers who have come up with the formulas for exhaust are differently qualified, that's all.

Arn
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Report this Post07-08-2013 10:21 AM Click Here to See the Profile for WillClick Here to Email WillSend a Private Message to WillEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

LOL "Live steam"


You words, man.

 
quote
Originally posted by Arns85GT:

I simply disagree that electrical calculations and related mathematical equations can account for the dynamics of high pressure.


'tevs. Peas owt.
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Report this Post07-11-2013 08:16 PM Click Here to See the Profile for HairoldClick Here to visit Hairold's HomePageClick Here to Email HairoldSend a Private Message to HairoldEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by aaronkoch:

Asterix, not sure where in the US you live, but Damian (Donesky Racing) in the Vancouver, WA area is currently building these:





Pure, equal length, true dual, tuned primary exhaust love.



These are unreal....They look good and extremely well designed.
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Report this Post07-12-2013 01:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for HairoldClick Here to visit Hairold's HomePageClick Here to Email HairoldSend a Private Message to HairoldEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Hairold:


All the scientific ramblings are very interesting. I used to design headers systems with a friend of mine, we did the old school way. We would rent an engine dyno (in San Jose) for a day, after we made sure the things fit!!! Set it up and run it at all PM ranges and work the tube length/diameters until we got the best over all HP/torque.
He was an engineer, and had access to some really neat stuff at SJSU engineering department. (no dyno though) He had a contact at Hooker, so we picked his brain for little tidbits that they had in the works.
We built them with "shock cones" "Vortex generators" and reverse gas cones in the head plates. We even did them with tube in tubes, crossovers, different tubes sizes for certain cylinders.
Over all, if you really, really need the absolute last drop of power, it was worth it. For me, in my own street machines, I built them with GOOD performance, fit, look good and sound good.
I honestly think you accomplished that in spades.
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Report this Post07-12-2013 04:29 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I agree in spades. Those are nice looking pipes IMHO

Arn
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Report this Post07-12-2013 05:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for AsterixClick Here to visit Asterix's HomePageSend a Private Message to AsterixEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Thanks Hairold and Arn, kind comments appreciated. Got it running two nights ago, thedrue did some adjustments, took it on the road for some shakedown last night, some needed adjustments accomplished about 2am this day. Some final tweaks on the list for this evening then a moderate road trip tomorrow for some "see how it goes" miles. The sound is reminiscent of an early '50s GM Blueflame 6 with split manifold plus a hint of Fiero thrown in. Very smooth mellow baritone sound, a bit on the loud side (but not too loud) as the PaceSetter Monza muffler tips are not yet installed. Though we haven't pushed it really hard, it shows hints of very spirited performance. After we put a couple of tanks of petrol through it, then will have an idea of whether it meets the economy goals hoped for. Disclosure: Hairold was the second owner of Asterix, we bought it from him early 2006.
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Report this Post07-12-2013 06:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Arns85GTClick Here to Email Arns85GTSend a Private Message to Arns85GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
"petrol"? I thought you are American?

Arn
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Asterix
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Report this Post07-12-2013 08:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for AsterixClick Here to visit Asterix's HomePageSend a Private Message to AsterixEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I have relatives in England ... and India ... I drove a car in India ... I figured those were good influences ... maybe ...
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Hairold
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Report this Post07-14-2013 10:43 AM Click Here to See the Profile for HairoldClick Here to visit Hairold's HomePageClick Here to Email HairoldSend a Private Message to HairoldEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Asterix:

Thanks Hairold and Arn, kind comments appreciated. Got it running two nights ago, thedrue did some adjustments, took it on the road for some shakedown last night, some needed adjustments accomplished about 2am this day. Some final tweaks on the list for this evening then a moderate road trip tomorrow for some "see how it goes" miles. The sound is reminiscent of an early '50s GM Blueflame 6 with split manifold plus a hint of Fiero thrown in. Very smooth mellow baritone sound, a bit on the loud side (but not too loud) as the PaceSetter Monza muffler tips are not yet installed. Though we haven't pushed it really hard, it shows hints of very spirited performance. After we put a couple of tanks of petrol through it, then will have an idea of whether it meets the economy goals hoped for. Disclosure: Hairold was the second owner of Asterix, we bought it from him early 2006.


Now I wish I was STILL the second owner...wah, wah...
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Asterix
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Report this Post07-14-2013 05:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for AsterixClick Here to visit Asterix's HomePageSend a Private Message to AsterixEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Now I wish I was STILL the second owner...wah, wah...


Hey, who was that guy who said "Why don't you buy it ..."! Huh, huh!

(Reving the world's smallest 660 ... since I can't play the world's smallest violin ... )
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Hairold
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Report this Post07-19-2013 12:52 PM Click Here to See the Profile for HairoldClick Here to visit Hairold's HomePageClick Here to Email HairoldSend a Private Message to HairoldEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Asterix:


Hey, who was that guy who said "Why don't you buy it ..."! Huh, huh!

(Reving the world's smallest 660 ... since I can't play the world's smallest violin ... )


Hah, if it wasn't for a wife telling me she would never get in it again. (after driving it 430 miles) I would still have it....but I was a good husband and obeyed the boss.
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Hairold
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Report this Post07-19-2013 01:00 PM Click Here to See the Profile for HairoldClick Here to visit Hairold's HomePageClick Here to Email HairoldSend a Private Message to HairoldEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Asterix:

Thanks Hairold and Arn, kind comments appreciated. Got it running two nights ago, thedrue did some adjustments, took it on the road for some shakedown last night, some needed adjustments accomplished about 2am this day. Some final tweaks on the list for this evening then a moderate road trip tomorrow for some "see how it goes" miles. The sound is reminiscent of an early '50s GM Blueflame 6 with split manifold plus a hint of Fiero thrown in. Very smooth mellow baritone sound, a bit on the loud side (but not too loud) as the PaceSetter Monza muffler tips are not yet installed. Though we haven't pushed it really hard, it shows hints of very spirited performance. After we put a couple of tanks of petrol through it, then will have an idea of whether it meets the economy goals hoped for. Disclosure: Hairold was the second owner of Asterix, we bought it from him early 2006.


I got my first ride along in Asterix yesterday. It has a better ride, more solid feel and stops like it should. It has much more response to the throttle and just felt better. Maybe is had something to do with the new seats as well. It has an exhaust sound I heard many years ago from a straight six with a split exhaust.
Bruce says it still needs some small things done, but overall, I think it is much, much improved.
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