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Water shortages, and what they mean by 2.5
Started on: 10-08-2021 11:35 AM
Replies: 17 (211 views)
Last post by: cvxjet on 10-09-2021 12:11 PM
2.5
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Report this Post10-08-2021 11:35 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
One example: The Colorado River level slowly getting lower.
Sounds like this could affect food sources too because of lack of irrigation.
Also they mention threats to major power generators on Lake Mead and Lake Powell.
They inserted folks blaming "climate change" in the video. Well yes a changing climate causes lots of things, it has throughout all of time. Changing climates have flooded civilizations, dried out civilizations and covered them in sand. Long term changes. Regardless of its cause (which people like to argue about), it would be wise to somehow prepare for less water, less food and less power.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVA7Ws6CchE&t=5s

[This message has been edited by 2.5 (edited 10-08-2021).]

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williegoat
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Report this Post10-08-2021 12:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Nearly half the water that comes out of my tap is from the Colorado river. An equally large portion is from the Salt and Verde rivers. One of the nation's largest metropolitan areas is skating on thin ice, yet within a few miles from my house there are ducks, osprey, eagles, herons, egrets and even pelicans.






Germane to your comment:
 
quote

They inserted folks blaming "climate change" in the video. Well yes a changing climate causes lots of things, it has throughout all of time.

Look up the Sinagua people.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 10-08-2021).]

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Report this Post10-08-2021 03:47 PM Click Here to See the Profile for IMSA GTClick Here to Email IMSA GTSend a Private Message to IMSA GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Eventually the ignorant politicians will finally realize that desalination is the best way to go. Even as a temporary basis until we have that much needed rainfall to refill the supply. Energy Recovery Inc. here in the Bay Area was one of the innovators of desalination. They had multiple plants all over the world providing clean water to millions of people. I don't understand the ignorance here in the U.S. You have a U.S based company that no one wants to use so they do all of their work overseas.

YES it is more expensive but it works.

[This message has been edited by IMSA GT (edited 10-08-2021).]

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Report this Post10-08-2021 04:46 PM Click Here to See the Profile for 2.5Send a Private Message to 2.5Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by IMSA GT:

... I don't understand the ignorance here in the U.S. You have a U.S based company that no one wants to use so they do all of their work overseas.

YES it is more expensive but it works.



Reminds me of a lot of things made and designed here.
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cvxjet
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Report this Post10-08-2021 05:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for cvxjetClick Here to Email cvxjetSend a Private Message to cvxjetEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
All of the coastal cities should be preparing by building desalination plants....But also, I was looking at the idea of the Mississippi basin flooding while the western states are in drought (Or vice-versa); Why not build an Aqueduct between the two regions and a large reservoir in between to store needed water?

Then again, I have been told that Man could never pull this kind of engineering off......Too expensive and complicated.....It would be like the Romans building aqueducts back 2000 years ago.....That would be crazy....right?
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Report this Post10-08-2021 05:33 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
https://saltriverstories.org/items/show/336
 
quote
The Hohokam people lived in the Mesa area for nearly 1,500 years. Hohokam, (a Pima Indian word meaning ‘‘those who have disappeared’’), first appeared around 1 CE initially growing beans, squash, corn and cotton serving a very small population of less than one thousand. Around 600 CE, the Hohokam population grew too large for sustainable living. As the population grew further from the river, the Hohokam began to construct canals for irrigation. Using digging sticks, the Native Americans excavated 12-feet deep canals, fanning into a larger network of smaller canals.

The canals that we use here today are based on the ancient Hohokam system.

These two projects are the reason Phoenix is possible:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_River_Project
https://en.wikipedia.org/wi...tral_Arizona_Project

I took these pictures from a friend's airplane over 30 years ago:

Stewart Mountain Dam - Saguaro Lake



Roosevelt Dam - Roosevelt Lake

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 10-08-2021).]

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BHall71
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Report this Post10-08-2021 05:55 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BHall71Send a Private Message to BHall71Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
williegoat,
Looks like those dang'd birds are drink'n up all your water.

Brian
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Report this Post10-08-2021 06:02 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by BHall71:

williegoat,
Looks like those dang'd birds are drink'n up all your water.

Brian

Those birds are at the "Glendale Recharge Ponds" at the end of the canal. Their purpose is to recharge the groundwater and are only about five feet deep. They are about a mile west of the stadium.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 10-08-2021).]

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Fats
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Report this Post10-08-2021 06:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for FatsClick Here to Email FatsSend a Private Message to FatsEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I like the idea of the desalinization plants, but wouldn't the outflow of very salty water cause problems in the area?

I suspect that the currents would carry the extra salty water elsewhere, and that it would potentially mix. But I remember reading somewhere about issues with the water being saltier, and creating a layer of extra salinized water that is a "dead zone" for life and doesn't mix as you would expect because of the specific gravity differences or something.

I don't know for sure, The Science™ is really hard to follow anymore since it's became so "settled".
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Report this Post10-08-2021 06:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Fats:

I like the idea of the desalinization plants, but wouldn't the outflow of very salty water cause problems in the area?

I suspect that the currents would carry the extra salty water elsewhere, and that it would potentially mix. But I remember reading somewhere about issues with the water being saltier, and creating a layer of extra salinized water that is a "dead zone" for life and doesn't mix as you would expect because of the specific gravity differences or something.

I don't know for sure, The Science™ is really hard to follow anymore since it's became so "settled".

I know nothing about desalinization, but would it be worthwhile to make salt from the waste?

It might just be a Dandi idea.


(In the spring of 1930, Gandhi led a march to the village of Dandi on India's west coast to make salt from seawater, in an act of defiance against British imperialism.)

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 10-08-2021).]

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Report this Post10-09-2021 12:40 AM Click Here to See the Profile for cvxjetClick Here to Email cvxjetSend a Private Message to cvxjetEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
In the Bay Area we have several square miles of Salt ponds to produce........SALT. So instead of evaporating water into the atmosphere so you can get salt, why not use desalination plants to give you....water AND Salt.....Makes sense (So that is the reason they won't do it)
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Report this Post10-09-2021 02:10 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by cvxjet:

All of the coastal cities should be preparing by building desalination plants....But also, I was looking at the idea of the Mississippi basin flooding while the western states are in drought (Or vice-versa); Why not build an Aqueduct between the two regions and a large reservoir in between to store needed water?

Then again, I have been told that Man could never pull this kind of engineering off......Too expensive and complicated.....It would be like the Romans building aqueducts back 2000 years ago.....That would be crazy....right?

Did you know that there are no large diameter pipelines carrying crude oil, diesel and gasoline from the Gulf Coast or West Texas over the Rocky Mountains to the Western states?
Ever ask yourself why?
Now, apply that answer to a product (water) that weighs considerably more than oil diesel, or gasoline.

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 10-09-2021).]

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Report this Post10-09-2021 02:50 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Desal water in Calif costs a average family of 5 about $2,200/year if all that family's water came from the desal plant.
Desal plants are expensive to build, expensive to maintain, and expensive to operate, with electric power being the biggest cost, with RO membrane replacemnt being 2nd largest cost.

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

https://saltriverstories.org/items/show/336
The canals that we use here today are based on the ancient Hohokam system.


From a nearly 60 year old song:

 
quote
Gather 'round me people
There's a story I would tell
'Bout a brave young Indian
You should remember well
From the land of the Pima Indian
A proud and noble band
Who farmed the Phoenix Valley
In Arizona land
Down the ditches a thousand years
The waters grew Ira's peoples' crops
'Til the white man stole their water rights
And the sparkling water stopped

Now, Ira's folks were hungry
And their land grew crops of weeds
When war came, Ira volunteered
And forgot the white man's greed
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Report this Post10-09-2021 04:35 AM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

From a nearly 60 year old song:

It was from that song, as sung by Johnny Cash, that I first heard of Ira Hayes.
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Report this Post10-09-2021 05:44 AM Click Here to See the Profile for AustralianClick Here to visit Australian's HomePageClick Here to Email AustralianSend a Private Message to AustralianEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Anyone down river a buyer of water or is gov pushing desalination then it is all political.
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Report this Post10-09-2021 09:30 AM Click Here to See the Profile for sourmashClick Here to Email sourmashSend a Private Message to sourmashEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Nestle doesnt have any problems bottling water to sell out of those Western states.
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Report this Post10-09-2021 11:38 AM Click Here to See the Profile for IMSA GTClick Here to Email IMSA GTSend a Private Message to IMSA GTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

Desal water in Calif costs a average family of 5 about $2,200/year if all that family's water came from the desal plant.
Desal plants are expensive to build, expensive to maintain, and expensive to operate, with electric power being the biggest cost, with RO membrane replacemnt being 2nd largest cost.




You're correct but in an emergency situation like this, they should be built and on standby until the next rainy season.....if we ever get a TRUE rainy season. Once reservoirs fill up from rainwater and we are out of the drought, the plants shut down until the next emergency.
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Report this Post10-09-2021 12:11 PM Click Here to See the Profile for cvxjetClick Here to Email cvxjetSend a Private Message to cvxjetEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

Did you know that there are no large diameter pipelines carrying crude oil, diesel and gasoline from the Gulf Coast or West Texas over the Rocky Mountains to the Western states?
Ever ask yourself why?
Now, apply that answer to a product (water) that weighs considerably more than oil diesel, or gasoline.



Back in 1908 they built the Los Angeles Aqueduct from the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada mountains over them to the LA basin.....They were able to get the water up and over via.......Gravity; The water going up the hill was pulled by the weight of the water dropping down the far side. Brilliant!

Side note; A flood washed out part of the aqueduct where (down low) it crossed a wash.....The suction in that section collapsed the iron tubing for miles. It was going to cost MILLIONS to go and replace all of that iron tubing (30' Diameter) but Mulholland (Who was the projects original engineer) came up with a better solution; He had the break fixed, and then filled the tube with water (shutting the valves at the far end) and then used the pumps at the front of the Aqueduct to pressurize the water, which expanded the iron tubing back out to almost original shape.



[This message has been edited by cvxjet (edited 10-09-2021).]

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