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Name That Tool! by Boondawg
Started on: 11-02-2019 12:47 PM
Replies: 94 (1087 views)
Last post by: theogre on 11-10-2019 12:15 AM
fierofool
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Report this Post11-05-2019 05:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

What are Boonie, Willie and Jake's items?

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williegoat
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Report this Post11-05-2019 05:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageClick Here to Email williegoatSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

What are Boonie, Willie and Jake's items?

Patrick posted a drawing that shows one of the three items that I posted.
I will tell you that all three are for repair or maintenance of string instruments.

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quote
Originally posted by GT-X:

The first tool is for finding rpm based on vibration or resonant frequency if you prefer.
The only problem with yours is you don't know it's range unless it's engraved on it.

Everything is a tachometer this week? OK, mine are tachometers, too.

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Report this Post11-05-2019 06:32 PM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageClick Here to Email williegoatSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I believe this is a well preserved example of a Precolumbian Mesoamerican tachometer. Every Mayan wagon I have ever seen had one on each wheel.



What? You say Mayans didn't have wagons? Well they never caught on because of the giant rock on each wheel.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 11-05-2019).]

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GT-X
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Report this Post11-05-2019 09:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for GT-XClick Here to Email GT-XSend a Private Message to GT-XEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

Patrick posted a drawing that shows one of the three items that I posted.
I will tell you that all three are for repair or maintenance of string instruments.


Except your pin puller for acoustic guitars, that's not a tach.

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williegoat
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quote
Originally posted by GT-X:

Except your pin puller for acoustic guitars, that's not a tach.

Yep, such a simple tool, but it sure gets the job done without the risk of scratching the pin or the bridge.

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quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

Tool #3

CLICK FOR FULL SIZE



Is mystery tool #3 for scoring, snapping or cutting glass tubing?

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Boondawg
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Report this Post11-05-2019 10:55 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BoondawgClick Here to Email BoondawgSend a Private Message to BoondawgEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

What are Boonie, Willie and Jake's items?


I don't know about the other guys, but I call mine "Uncle Tony"...

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Report this Post11-06-2019 06:34 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

The first one looks a little like a guira scraper. Is their any lettering on it?




Not a 'guira' scraper. I have one and I can tell you that it has nothing to do with musical instruments.
The rods are held tightly together, and are extremely stiff high carbon.
(yes, I know what it is)

One of Fierofool's other 2 pics tell me he's into vintage engines and both of those tools are definitely............keepers.

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-06-2019).]

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Report this Post11-06-2019 06:39 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

Is mystery tool #3 for scoring, snapping or cutting glass tubing?


No..see my previous post.

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fierofool
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Report this Post11-06-2019 08:36 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I know the 3rd one is automotive or engine related. I'm not sure about the others. I acquired them in a box of old wrenches. Good heavy duty wrenches that might also be used on farm implements.

Tool #1 does look like some kind of scraper due to the wear on the tips of the rods. They have a little curl on the ends and they are quite rigid.

[This message has been edited by fierofool (edited 11-06-2019).]

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Report this Post11-06-2019 09:05 AM Click Here to See the Profile for E.FurgalSend a Private Message to E.FurgalEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

piano tuning

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maryjane
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Report this Post11-06-2019 09:32 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

#3 is definitely automotive related. It's used to retain valve stem keepers on in-block valves, such as the old flathead engines where access to the valves and lifters was on the side of the block. (It's why I left the hint that it was "a keeper".
The radiused part was originally magnetized so that once you compressed the spring and opened the radius, the valve keepers wouldn't fall out of it...same for installation. Been a lot of years ago in my father's auto shop but I've used that same tool. Blue point made that particular tool and part # is CF-7. You may not be able to read the writing on yours but it originally said this:


The scraper looking tool, I've seen in welding and metal working shops and home forges long ago. As I said..I have one and use it as a scraper to knock slag off low hydrogen welds. I believe it's intended use is some kind of carbon scraper, perhaps for cyl heads and blocks. The rods are very hard steel. I'll have to dig mine out and see if there's a name on it.

I'm not sure #2 wasn't a diabolical dental tool, but something about it also says 'automotive'.

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-06-2019).]

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williegoat
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Report this Post11-06-2019 11:14 AM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageClick Here to Email williegoatSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I never would have thought of that because I have never actually worked on a flathead.

The scrapper, I was actually leaning towards a ferrier's tool.

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Report this Post11-06-2019 12:22 PM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I worked on lots of flatheads, both in automobiles and N series Ford tractors. Relatively simple engines but prone to cracked heads due to thin casting.
I owned and drove a 53 Mercury for about 1 1/2 years when I lived in Guantanamo Bay in the mid 70s. Gave $150 for it, buying it from the sailor I replaced. Did the same when I left..sold it to my replacement.

Getting the starters in and out of those old Fords was a real pain, as the bendix pulls in, toward the body of the starter (and toward front of engine) , meaning to get it in or out, you have to work that big bendix spring around the edge of the flywheel so it can sit 'behind' the ring gear. Same 2 bolts that hold the starter housing together also are used to mount it so it was easy for the whole thing to fall apart as you were pulling it oput or putting it in. Not much room to tilt it to the side and it had to be positioned exactly right to get it in/out.
Generator tho, was right up on top and easy peasy to get to, tho it was big and heavy.

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-06-2019).]

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fierofool
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Report this Post11-06-2019 01:09 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Maryjane gets a used ignition control module. Yes, it's a valve stem keeper tool. Blue Point CF-7 made in Kenosha, Wi. I also think the first tool is a scraper of some kind. Welding slag was my thoughts, too. While cleaning it with some metal polish, I discovered that the band around the rods will actually slide up and down the length of the rods. There are no manufacturer's marks on it.

[This message has been edited by fierofool (edited 11-06-2019).]

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williegoat
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quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

I worked on lots of flatheads, both in automobiles and N series Ford tractors.

Back in the '70s, I worked at a lumber yard that had a Gerlinger forklift with a Ford flathead V8. It was a big noisy piece of crap with chain drive and a butterfly hood, that could barely lift 3,500 lbs. I think it was built sometime in the forties.

If memory serves me, it was much like this one.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 11-06-2019).]

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fierofool
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Report this Post11-06-2019 02:39 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I found the #2 tool. It's a welding tool. Don't know how it's used, but it's a welding tool.

http://shop.cedarpostpawn.c...434aae6e6585609c4d89

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williegoat
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quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

I found the #2 tool. It's a welding tool. Don't know how it's used, but it's a welding tool.

http://shop.cedarpostpawn.c...434aae6e6585609c4d89

The pawn shop has misidentified it. That is a brake spring tool. I have one just like it.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 11-06-2019).]

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fierofool
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Report this Post11-06-2019 02:55 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I also found tool # 1, thanks to maryjane's lead on flathead engines. It's a vintage bearing scraper. I found an image of it but I can't pull it from the website or save it to file. It's a UK vintage tool site. I wonder if it may have been used on leather bearings.

[This message has been edited by fierofool (edited 11-06-2019).]

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Report this Post11-06-2019 03:14 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

The pawn shop has misidentified it. That is a brake spring tool. I have one just like it.



I agree due to the shoe spring keeper tool on the end of the handle. The one I have has a very sharp point on one jaw that appears to be designed to punch into something. I just noticed the link I posted, though it says welding tool, in the path above, it says non-welding tools.

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Patrick
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Report this Post11-06-2019 03:38 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by williegoat:

If memory serves me, it was much like this one.


I enjoyed reading that three page thread. I was surprised at all the references (and favorable as well) to old Wisconsin twin and V4 air-cooled engines. For four years, my first job out of high school back in '73 was rebuilding B&S, Tecumseh, Kohler and Wisconsin air-cooled engines. Seems like a long time ago.

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Report this Post11-06-2019 04:22 PM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

I also found tool # 1, thanks to maryjane's lead on flathead engines. It's a vintage bearing scraper. I found an image of it but I can't pull it from the website or save it to file. It's a UK vintage tool site. I wonder if it may have been used on leather bearings.


I doubt it used on leather bearings.
https://www.worthpoint.com/...on-scraper-459562284


Evidently, they are still being made and sold.

https://www.shoplet.com/Pro...7/SEPTLS5772337/spdv

https://www.trident-supply....Flexible-p/j2337.htm

PROTO Catalog page 969



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Report this Post11-06-2019 07:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I found one on ebay under vintage carbon gasket scraper. Sold for $17. Think I'll keep it. Gonna probably be doing an oil pan gasket soon.

I also found the valve spring keeper tool as a hardware store vintage tool liquidation. Brand new NOS for $20.

By the returns of vintage tools, looks like the box of wrenches I have are also from the flathead era. All in a very good condition, too.

Thanks, maryjane.

[This message has been edited by fierofool (edited 11-06-2019).]

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Patrick
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Report this Post11-06-2019 08:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

I found one on ebay under vintage carbon gasket scraper.


With all the memories of my first job flooding back, I now recall that we had one of those scrapers in the shop. If I remember correctly (as it was 45 years ago!), that style of scraper was a little risky to use on aluminum as the individual hardened steel sharpened rods could easily gouge aluminum if care wasn't taken. Much safer when used on cast iron surfaces.

[This message has been edited by Patrick (edited 11-06-2019).]

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Report this Post11-06-2019 11:30 PM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

These are not really all that old at all and are pretty common.
40-50 yrs old I guess. I suspect many here have used them.
I blacked out the patent number just to make it a little harder.
A PFF hint for the brand is "a dog's butt"



These, are not really a tool as such, and I probably have posted a pic of them before. They are at newest, from the early 1900s and at oldest, from mid 1800s.



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Report this Post11-06-2019 11:41 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

A PFF hint for the brand is "a dog's butt"


Okay, it's made by Champion then. Is it some sort of spark tester?

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Report this Post11-06-2019 11:57 PM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Yep. A CT436 Champion 'firing indicator".




What they looked like new? (not mine below)

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-07-2019).]

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Report this Post11-07-2019 12:06 AM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post


I've honestly never seen one before. Do they work by inductance? In other words, is it not necessary for this device to be connected "in line"?

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Report this Post11-07-2019 12:22 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Yes. The gas has evidently leaked out of one of the ones I have but the other one still works.

From a 1972 popular mechanics article titled NEW TOOLS FOR TUNEUP AND TROUBLESHOOTING

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Report this Post11-07-2019 12:37 AM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post


Cool!

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Report this Post11-07-2019 01:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

another old tool that I've often wondered if it was still parked there in the same place where I took the picture about 25 yrs ago. It had been there for over 2 decades prior to me seeing it. Got to be worth a lot in just scrap iron value.



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Report this Post11-07-2019 07:55 AM Click Here to See the Profile for blackramsClick Here to Email blackramsSend a Private Message to blackramsEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

 
quote
Originally posted by maryjane:

another old tool that I've often wondered if it was still parked there in the same place where I took the picture about 25 yrs ago. It had been there for over 2 decades prior to me seeing it. Got to be worth a lot in just scrap iron value.




Looks like Big Brutus in KS.
Edited: Don’t believe it is Big Brutus now that I think about it. Big Brutus is an historic landmark and I doubt the keepers would allow it to get into that condition. Appears to be a shovel, most likely steam powered.

Rams

[This message has been edited by blackrams (edited 11-07-2019).]

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Report this Post11-07-2019 10:47 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Not Brutus..this one was on the Black River levee in La ....central part of the state.

A little more info in this 17 year old thread:
http://www.fiero.nl/forum/A...020511-6-005510.html

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williegoat
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Report this Post11-07-2019 10:56 AM Click Here to See the Profile for williegoatClick Here to visit williegoat's HomePageClick Here to Email williegoatSend a Private Message to williegoatEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I think I might know what it is, but I cheated. If I am right, there is at least one guy here who should know instantly because he was in that business, albeit on a much smaller scale.

edit: Nevermind. I thought maybe it was a gold dredge. I was typing this while maryjane posted his response.



I just read your description of how it "walks". That had to be a jarring ride, and comical to watch.

[This message has been edited by williegoat (edited 11-07-2019).]

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Report this Post11-07-2019 11:42 AM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

A different view with a friend of mine in the window to illustrate the size. It had a huge bucket on it, but evidently I no longer have that picture.
There are MUCH larger draglines than this up in Ill coal country and in potash open pit mines, but this is the only one I have seen with my own eyes, and the fact that they simply abandoned it in place all those decades ago when the levee was complete I found interesting. It's within eye sight of some Indian mounds on the Black river on private property but I've not been able to find it on Google Earth. It may have been bought and sold off for scrap since I was there.

[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-07-2019).]

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williegoat
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I love stuff like that. To me, it has a spooky once-upon-a-time vision of the future kind of vibe. (if that makes sense) Life what they thought the future would look like 100 years ago.

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Report this Post11-07-2019 12:38 PM Click Here to See the Profile for theogreClick Here to visit theogre's HomePageSend a Private Message to theogreEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

is a "walking dragline." 2 big moving metal parts on sides "Walks" the thing to relocate. (Other side hidden should have same if not been scrapped.)
I have many odd tools will post one today.

------------------
Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.
(Jurassic Park)


The Ogre's Fiero Cave

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Report this Post11-07-2019 03:39 PM Click Here to See the Profile for maryjaneSend a Private Message to maryjaneEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

A 46 year old ' tool', but ID is not required. It's a full box tho. Check price and date on the tag....1973
Oshmans Sporting Goods went out of business here in the 90s.

Same box of ammo is $15 now.
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1001784282

Got plenty more, so I'm saving these for the zombies..


[This message has been edited by maryjane (edited 11-07-2019).]

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theogre
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Report this Post11-07-2019 05:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for theogreClick Here to visit theogre's HomePageSend a Private Message to theogreEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

CLICK FOR FULL SIZE

Yes. ends are connected but crop to reduce image size.
I know what and why it read 0 - 8 PSI

CLICK FOR FULL SIZE

Is made by Anderson Company AKA ANCO to sell wipers etc. decades ago.
I believe was a "scam" because no-one I can find found the “Highway Visibility Bureau” that this tool claim is the "Official Test Indicator."
Can find an address in some ads etc by ANCO to get one of these. like http://www2.mnhs.org/librar...pdfa/00442-00728.pdf at end of interview in '58.

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