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paint on lace wheels by sledcaddie
Started on: 12-05-2018 01:53 PM
Replies: 4 (146 views)
Last post by: sledcaddie on 12-10-2018 01:53 PM
sledcaddie
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Report this Post12-05-2018 01:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for sledcaddieSend a Private Message to sledcaddieEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

What type of paint is on the gold or black "lace" wheels? It seems kinda thick and/or plastic, like maybe some sort of epoxy? Just wondering in case I want to change colors. Anyone done this? Remove the old first?

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theogre
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Report this Post12-05-2018 02:52 PM Click Here to See the Profile for theogreClick Here to visit theogre's HomePageSend a Private Message to theogreEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

You often can remove clear coat w/ paint stripper but not the color "paint" on rims.

I believe GM and others uses 2 step finishes...
"Paint" in/on them isn't just normal paint. Many are like Imron 2 part paint then often baked or are "powder paint" and baked. Both plans are often chemical resistance.
Then over that clear coated to keep alloy bright and shinny.

ETA--> Some colors are Anodize then final machine then clear coat. You never remove anodizing by DIY methods but can damage it using other chemical to strip clear coat. Example: If you ever tried oven cleaner on anodize pots etc... that can ruin the anodize and even aluminum pot.

Using normal paint often doesn't stick and flakes off soon even if you remove all factory finishes and use special primers for aluminum.
Try single or 2 part epoxy or car paint w/ hardener added to it.
Either type and paint strippers you need a mask w/ VOC filters. Many claim low/no VOC but ignore that when using them because is only a 1 foot or three in front of you. Breathing even dry over spray can cause problems to many people.

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[This message has been edited by theogre (edited 12-05-2018).]

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sledcaddie
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Report this Post12-06-2018 01:56 PM Click Here to See the Profile for sledcaddieSend a Private Message to sledcaddieEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

Thank you, sir. It appeared to me that is was more than just paint (too thick). That's why I thought it might be epoxy (like the 2 part mix you mentioned). The clear coat is probably a single spray, as that it was usually deteriorates. There is a wheel restoration company in a larger city near me. I'll consult them on this.

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OldGuyinaGT
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Report this Post12-08-2018 01:11 PM Click Here to See the Profile for OldGuyinaGTClick Here to Email OldGuyinaGTSend a Private Message to OldGuyinaGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

I painted the black lace wheels on my 88 GT last year. This after research indicated that I could have them professionally restored to like new - for $150 to $200/wheel.

The clear on the rims was pretty bad, pock marks and some light but very visible corrosion in some spots where the clear was no longer. Lace chipped in a few places. I did all the work with wheels two at a time off the car, tires on the wheels. I sanded the clear rim part of the wheels with a Dremel and by hand, and managed to keep the factory appearance of the machine mark looking lines in the rims. I smoothed a couple of spots where there was some curb rash, then scuffed the lace part with 3M green pads. I masked off the clear part of the rims with 3M Blue masking tape, and tucked index cards between the rims and tires to avoid overspray. I put some 1/2" flat washers in the lug holes to avoid painting the tapered part of the holes and popped out the center caps. I wiped wheels down with a tack rag, then Duplicolor Paint Prep, and then shot the lace part with Duplicolor Professional Wheel Coating (black). Then I unmasked the rim part and shot the whole wheels with gloss clear Duplicolor Wheel Coating. A year and 8000 miles later they look like I just did 'em. Given the time/miles I have on them, I'm confident that this is going to hold up very well.

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sledcaddie
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Report this Post12-10-2018 01:53 PM Click Here to See the Profile for sledcaddieSend a Private Message to sledcaddieEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

So, this Duplicator is "wheel coating", which is different from paint? (I'm referring to the black used on the lace portion of the wheel). Yes, there is a wheel restoration shop near here. It wants $180 per wheel, but this includes truing the wheel, balancing, and refinishing. I'd rather do it myself.

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