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88 rear caliper twist in? by Ray_and_kevin
Started on: 02-10-2015 05:59 PM
Replies: 4 (377 views)
Last post by: theogre on 02-12-2015 10:49 AM
Ray_and_kevin
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Report this Post02-10-2015 05:59 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Ray_and_kevinSend a Private Message to Ray_and_kevinEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Two things:

1) isn't the piston supposed to just twist in until it bottoms? I can twist the rear passenger all day and it does not twist in. I could have sworn that was how it was supposed to work. Of course others like the Mustang needed pressure as well as twisting to get it back in.
2) Both 88's have the outer pad on both wheels worn twice as much as the inside pad. Looking at the rubber boots, it looks like they try to pull the caliper to the inside which would make the outside pad drag more. Is that the experience of the group?
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Bloozberry
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Report this Post02-10-2015 06:59 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BloozberrySend a Private Message to BloozberryEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
You have to remove the e-brake lever from the caliper to push the pistons back in. They don't simply spin in.

As for the way the caliper works, what you're seeing is normal, except for the uneven pad wear. As you press the pedal, the cylinder in the caliper is pushed outward until the inner pad makes contact with the rotor. As soon as the inner pad contacts the rotor, the caliper starts to slide inwards on the slider pins and forces the outer pad to contact the rotor as well. If you're getting faster wear on the outer pads, it's because the caliper is sticking on the slider pins when you release the pedal. You need to regrease the pins or check for corrosion on them... to do that, there's only one way... remove the caliper from the knuckle (leave the hydraulic line connected) and remove the sliders to check them.
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Report this Post02-12-2015 09:59 AM Click Here to See the Profile for GodSendClick Here to Email GodSendSend a Private Message to GodSendEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Bloozberry:

You have to remove the e-brake lever from the caliper to push the pistons back in. They don't simply spin in.

As for the way the caliper works, what you're seeing is normal, except for the uneven pad wear. As you press the pedal, the cylinder in the caliper is pushed outward until the inner pad makes contact with the rotor. As soon as the inner pad contacts the rotor, the caliper starts to slide inwards on the slider pins and forces the outer pad to contact the rotor as well. If you're getting faster wear on the outer pads, it's because the caliper is sticking on the slider pins when you release the pedal. You need to regrease the pins or check for corrosion on them... to do that, there's only one way... remove the caliper from the knuckle (leave the hydraulic line connected) and remove the sliders to check them.


And get ready for the horror that is trying to reinstall the slider boots....
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fierofool
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Report this Post02-12-2015 10:10 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Rotating the piston without removing the lever will probably damage the adjuster screw.

Once you've got the calipers ready to go back on, here's how you do the initial adjustment so you have a good pedal.

http://gafiero.akroncdnr.co...oBrakeAdjustment.pdf
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theogre
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Report this Post02-12-2015 10:49 AM Click Here to See the Profile for theogreClick Here to visit theogre's HomePageSend a Private Message to theogreEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:
Rotating the piston without removing the lever will probably damage the adjuster screw.
Once you've got the calipers ready to go back on, here's how you do the initial adjustment so you have a good pedal.
http://gafiero.akroncdnr.co...oBrakeAdjustment.pdf

No and maybe.

Rotate the piston w/ GM tool is hard. You need to apply pressure and turning in the piston. Lever is on. Using generic tools need to remove iron part of caliper and not a good idea.

Pushing in only then need to remove lever and nut so screw can move. Carefully pry/squeeze the piston back. Should move fairly easy if screw isn't binding.

That and other Adjustments method are mostly useless. If you need to manually adjust then very likely the piston is bad and you will have problem w/ rear brakes.

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