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Recovering Sun Visors DYI by ILVMYGT
Started on: 01-23-2015 11:18 PM
Replies: 9 (552 views)
Last post by: theogre on 01-24-2015 01:51 PM
ILVMYGT
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Report this Post01-23-2015 11:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ILVMYGTClick Here to Email ILVMYGTSend a Private Message to ILVMYGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
This is an article on how to recover your sun visors. I recently asked Fiero Thomas if he was still recovering sun visor and he is no longer providing that service. So let's get started and take apart the mysterious sun visor and dispel any myths about it. Find a clean, flat place to do the work.

What you will need.

Tools

Phillips head screw driver.
Razor knife
Scissors
Hot glue gun
Sewing machine

Material

Headliner material (available at Jo-Ann's Fabric)
Poster or Construction Card board (Walmart or art store)


Disassembly

Remove the visor from the car and remove the arm and tensioning screw.



Next cut the stitching around the edge and separate the cardboard.





Next remove the hardboard and hinge assembly.



Remove the old material. The old material has some foam backing. On this visor it was dust. Clean it off over a garbage can.



Reference picture: You will notice that they use some type of glue to holds the material to the card board.

Continued in next post.
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ILVMYGT
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Report this Post01-23-2015 11:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ILVMYGTClick Here to Email ILVMYGTSend a Private Message to ILVMYGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
New Cardboard.

You will need a piece of poster or construction board. We recycle/reuse so I use an old poster.

Place the old cardboard on to the new board. Tape it in place so it does not move around while you trace it. After you trace it cut it out. For the inside corners I used a Razor knife so it would not tear the cardboard corner.



You will notice that there are two creases that allow the cardboard to go around the hinge assembly. Transfer the crease marks to the new cardboard on both ends.




Now you have to crease the cardboard. You will want very straight crisp creases. I use a board and large dust pan.



It should look like this when you are done.



When you fold it over, look to see how close the edges line up. They need to be very close or it will show up in the final assemble. You can see the black sticking out the edge. Trimmed all the areas that did not line up.



This is what is should look like when you are done. Make sure that you cut the hole for the tension screw. Also, not shown. Where the cardboard is creased it is stressed on the outside bend so I reinforced it with a strip of duct tape.



Per request added picture of cardboard with measurements.




Continued in next post

[This message has been edited by ILVMYGT (edited 01-24-2015).]

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ILVMYGT
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Report this Post01-23-2015 11:30 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ILVMYGTClick Here to Email ILVMYGTSend a Private Message to ILVMYGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Cover the Cardboard.

Cut a piece of headline material about one inch larger than the cardboard. Check the weave or grain and match it. Also I marked a "glue line about 3/8 inch from the edge. I did this so that the glue would not interfere with the stitching.



I also marked about where the curve started so I could glue up to that point and then work the corner.



Start gluing along the one of the straight edges and glue up to the corner. I use the hot glue and went a little section at a time. Pull the material taught to just remove the wrinkles. Now glue the other long edge.

Cut the material and work the corner. Do the remaining corners.





The original visors did something different, this is what I did and it seemed to work.



It should look something like this. I trimmed excess material off.



The front side should look like this.



Continued in the next post.
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ILVMYGT
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Report this Post01-23-2015 11:38 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ILVMYGTClick Here to Email ILVMYGTSend a Private Message to ILVMYGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Final Assembly.

Reinstall the hardboard and hinge assembly.



Fold the piece together. Check the fit along the edges to make sure they line up. It should look like this.



Now sew the edge together. My wife did this on her regular machine (i.e., non-commercial). My wife is a very good sewer, but it was still tricky getting around the corners. The better this is done the better the visor will look.



Find the hole for the tensioning screw and use a pointed tool to pierce the material and install the screw. Move the hardboard and hinge assembly as necessary to line the hole up.



To cover the gap at the end roll up a scrape of material and insert in the end.



Reinstall the arm and tighten the tensioning screw.



Reinstall in the car.

I am pleased with the results.

The visors I used did not have the extra like the pockets or mirror. I don't know how hard the pocket would be to do. The mirror is most likely installed before sewing.

This is not a high dollar DYI. If the cardboard or sewing does not turn out the way you want it just do it over.

------------------
88 GT 5 Speed Black with gray interior
3800 SCII Swap Complete.
Paint Complete
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IT RUNS!!
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"Real integrity is doing the right thing, knowing that nobody's going to know whether you did it or not."

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JohnWPB
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Report this Post01-24-2015 03:38 AM Click Here to See the Profile for JohnWPBClick Here to visit JohnWPB's HomePageSend a Private Message to JohnWPBEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
+1 for you!

Very nice write up! I am gonna give this a try. I do not have a sewing machine, so I will do everything up to that point, and then find someone that can sew it up for me.
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tshark
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Report this Post01-24-2015 08:14 AM Click Here to See the Profile for tsharkSend a Private Message to tsharkEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Nice write-up!
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f85gtron
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Report this Post01-24-2015 10:04 AM Click Here to See the Profile for f85gtronSend a Private Message to f85gtronEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I just did the same thing, except i used two sheets of card stock and laminated them together to get the right thickness. The other difference is that i had to sew by hand. It hurt pushing through the card stock, but nothing a thimble wouldn't fix. Worth while for sure! I spend time at stop lights staring at the visors, like an idiot. The interior is now complete!
Ron
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seajai
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Report this Post01-24-2015 11:46 AM Click Here to See the Profile for seajaiSend a Private Message to seajaiEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Great writeup! My visors have been sitting on the shelf for a couple years now in desperate need of recovering, looks like I need to give this a try. +1 for you!
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darbysan
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Report this Post01-24-2015 12:46 PM Click Here to See the Profile for darbysanClick Here to Email darbysanSend a Private Message to darbysanEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I did something similar a while back on my Elky, and this write up is spot on! One additional thing I did was to add a Homelink garage Door module ( purchase off Ebay for about $15). I cut a hole in the inner hardboard to accomodate the module, and then use some 1/8" foam to smooth out the area. I put mine with the buttons facing the top, rather than facing the driver, just so it would not be quite so visable. You can do it either way. If the module you get on ebay is not the right color, it is very easy to change color with SEM or Duplicolor.



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'87 GT in process!

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theogre
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Report this Post01-24-2015 01:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for theogreClick Here to visit theogre's HomePageSend a Private Message to theogreEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The small holes are for Visors w/ Mirrors. Most can and should ignore them.

Please put a picture of OE cardboard and a ruler or two. Fill the view only with the cardboard and ruler(s).
Why? Many people have bad cardboard, often so bad is in small pieces. Picture w/ ruler is to make a scale printed paper to cut out new cardboard.

------------------
Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.
(Jurassic Park)


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