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Gas Leak... by a_bartle
Started on: 03-19-2014 07:55 AM
Replies: 13 (203 views)
Last post by: a_bartle on 03-19-2014 04:06 PM
a_bartle
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Report this Post03-19-2014 07:55 AM Click Here to See the Profile for a_bartleClick Here to Email a_bartleSend a Private Message to a_bartleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Went out to my shed last night and I smelled gas. I looked under my '87 Fiero and I could see wetness. I "thought" it was the fuel filter (replaced that last fall) and would need to be tightened. Crawled under the car and I'm almost positive it's NOT that. It looks like the "other" gas line (not sure what it is, a return line or something) that runs right beside the line with the filter; it is very rusty and I think it has sprung a leak. I traced the line, it looks like up by the engine it changes to a rubber hose via a pressed fitting, and at the other end it's fastened to a rubber hose near the tank (again, is this a "return" gas line?). Is that entire gas line (including the pressed on rubber hose part) available to purchase? The other option I thought of was just cutting the gas line that's there where it's good and either running a longer rubber hose, or actually putting in a other piece of metal gas line and just clamp in a short piece of hose. However, I don't want to do a "patch job", I want to do it right. Would there be any issue with just running a longer piece of rubber hose next to the other gas line?

What are your thoughts?

Thanks...
Art
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Report this Post03-19-2014 08:13 AM Click Here to See the Profile for woodyhereClick Here to Email woodyhereSend a Private Message to woodyhereEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
It might be a good idea to take the tank out. There should be 3 metal lines coming from the top of the tank. They all come as a unit when you get a new sending unit. I think it would be good to get the tank out and get a better look at the tank itself and the lines coming from it. There might be rust that you can't see causing the leak. The three lines are: pressure out, the return and then the vent line. If you get the tank out, post some pics so we can be of more help.

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Gall757
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Report this Post03-19-2014 08:19 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Gall757Send a Private Message to Gall757Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Put fresh newspaper under the car and run the fuel pump. You should be able to get a better location.
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84fiero123
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Report this Post03-19-2014 09:01 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 84fiero123Click Here to Email 84fiero123Send a Private Message to 84fiero123Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Gall757:

Put fresh newspaper under the car and run the fuel pump. You should be able to get a better location.


I like big sheets of cardboard, more absorbent and they can be found at any big store for free, bicycle boxes at a store that sells them are great size and thicker than most regular cardboard. just remember gas can run down away from where the actual leak started so you may have to look around.

Steve

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a_bartle
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Report this Post03-19-2014 09:27 AM Click Here to See the Profile for a_bartleClick Here to Email a_bartleSend a Private Message to a_bartleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I threw some of that oil sucker powder down on the cement, then a large piece of cardboard, and then a plastic tray to catch any gas currently driping. As far as the lines, actually they all look pretty good, only in this one spot where it runs horizontal next to the filter (maybe about a 8 to 10 inches) is really rusty, so I'm hoping that's the only real issue I have. I won't know a whole lot more until I can get the car up in the air, and that won't be until some of this snow is melted so I can get the shed "unpacked" with other cars and stuff put away for the winter. I don't want to start up the car or even run the fuel pump right now to "pressurize" the lines until I'm ready to fix it (hoping it's not leaking much now, the tank still reads full). Hoping to get a plan in place before I dig in.
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84fiero123
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Report this Post03-19-2014 09:46 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 84fiero123Click Here to Email 84fiero123Send a Private Message to 84fiero123Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by a_bartle:

I threw some of that oil sucker powder down on the cement, then a large piece of cardboard, and then a plastic tray to catch any gas currently driping. As far as the lines, actually they all look pretty good, only in this one spot where it runs horizontal next to the filter (maybe about a 8 to 10 inches) is really rusty, so I'm hoping that's the only real issue I have. I won't know a whole lot more until I can get the car up in the air, and that won't be until some of this snow is melted so I can get the shed "unpacked" with other cars and stuff put away for the winter. I don't want to start up the car or even run the fuel pump right now to "pressurize" the lines until I'm ready to fix it (hoping it's not leaking much now, the tank still reads full). Hoping to get a plan in place before I dig in.


if its just a small section you can sometimes get away with a small section of the right size steel line and a couple of compression fittings. brake lines come in all sizes and shapes, and are bendable if need be. only real tool you might need to buy is a small tubing cutter, big ones are not always usable in tight spots.

Steve

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and one big pain in the ass when it doesn't



Detroit iron rules all the rest are just toys.

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Report this Post03-19-2014 09:52 AM Click Here to See the Profile for CsjagClick Here to Email CsjagSend a Private Message to CsjagEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The Fiero store sells replacement lines
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a_bartle
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Report this Post03-19-2014 10:12 AM Click Here to See the Profile for a_bartleClick Here to Email a_bartleSend a Private Message to a_bartleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post


Found the part at the Fiero Store, $90 bucks plus shipping, ouch (it's SS, which I'm sure makes it more expensive, I've been looking at the auto parts stores, thus far I have not found this part, hoping for something cheaper). I put an arrow next to that straight area (maybe 8" or less) that is bad, the rest of the line looks good. Any reason I couldn't just get a some gas line hose and eliminate the short piece next to the tank and just run it up closer to the part that starts going up toward the engine, then just use a couple of clamps? Or would it be better to get some metal line, put a couple bends in it, re-attach the hose next to the tank, then insert another short hose with clamps to re-attach it to the good upper section of the line? The only thing I don't like about this last option is "two" more connections with clamps, but maybe it's the better option because that puts "metal" line along the bottom of the car....
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Report this Post03-19-2014 11:04 AM Click Here to See the Profile for FadingawayClick Here to Email FadingawaySend a Private Message to FadingawayEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I have personally replaced return line hose on a stock Toyota Camry with rubber hose because of rust, but only because the metal tube that connected to the fuel pump ran into rubber so instead of about 8 inches of metal and 4 rubber I opted for all rubber hose. This being said I'm not sure I would attempt this with the Fiero and go with the sugestion of splicing in brake line with compression fittings for a cheap fix
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a_bartle
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Report this Post03-19-2014 01:34 PM Click Here to See the Profile for a_bartleClick Here to Email a_bartleSend a Private Message to a_bartleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Here is another idea I had. Use a longer piece of rubber gas line hose, but run it "inside" a piece of metal half inch electrical conduit (or plastic for that matter) for protection along the bottom of the car. I think that would be ok, then it's just replacing the short hose near the tank with a longer hose.
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Report this Post03-19-2014 01:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by a_bartle:

Here is another idea I had. Use a longer piece of rubber gas line hose, but run it "inside" a piece of metal half inch electrical conduit (or plastic for that matter) for protection along the bottom of the car. I think that would be ok, then it's just replacing the short hose near the tank with a longer hose.


You'd have to be careful with that. If the rubber hose rubs against the conduit, the rubber could be cut open pretty quickly.

Why not just replace it with the proper line? The braided stainless lines at The Fiero Store might be out of your budget, but surely you can get the proper metal lines at NAPA or somewhere, for relatively cheap.
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Gall757
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Report this Post03-19-2014 01:47 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Gall757Send a Private Message to Gall757Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
We are lucky to have a resource like the Fiero Store. For a 28 year old car, it has a lot of hardware support. You could easily spend $90 dreaming up an alternative setup that won't be as trustworthy.
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Report this Post03-19-2014 03:30 PM Click Here to See the Profile for dobeySend a Private Message to dobeyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Do you have a V6 car? If so, how long are you willing to wait for the lines? My 87 GT has the Fiero Store stainless braided fuel lines on it, but the car has not been running for a while (blown head gasket at least and expired state inspection), and I won't need the stock style lines for the engine swap I'm very slowly working on.

I'd be willing to pull the lines and sell them for less than what TFS wants for new ones. They've been on my car for about 7 years and are still good. I could maybe get them pulled out this weekend. PM me if you want to buy them.
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a_bartle
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Report this Post03-19-2014 04:06 PM Click Here to See the Profile for a_bartleClick Here to Email a_bartleSend a Private Message to a_bartleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
As far as the conduit goes, I figured if I used metal I'd flair the ends out good, or if I used plastic, I'd sand it really good so there wouldn't be any sharp edges...
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