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Corner balancing/weight jacking Fiero suspension by Bridgetown
Started on: 11-14-2013 12:28 AM
Replies: 4 (361 views)
Last post by: Bridgetown on 11-14-2013 11:56 PM
Bridgetown
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Report this Post11-14-2013 12:28 AM Click Here to See the Profile for BridgetownSend a Private Message to BridgetownEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I'm thinking about taking my suspension to the next level. I'm wondering what other experienced people think about corner balancing the suspension. My car is driven for pleasure only (mostly hard B-road blasts) the occasional auto-x or road course day.
Here is the current setup

Front:
'86 System
WCF 1.5" drop springs 350#
Koni adjustable dampers
Stock bushings
Stock sway bar
Steering damper removed

Rear:
'88 System
Coilovers conversion with 275# springs (my car has lighter power train hence only going up to a 275# rate)
Koni adjustable dampers
Stock bushings
Stock swaybar

Planned upgrades so far:
HPP adjustable sway bars front + rear http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum4/HTML/043365.html
Poly bushings everywhere
Fieroguru '88 lateral link relocation kit http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum4/HTML/060635.html
Rod end/heim joint lateral link upgrade http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum2/HTML/120882.html

I'm really struggling with wether it is going to be worth it to upgrade the front to coilovers and drop spindles. This has three benifits over an upgraded stock front system
1. Ability to corner balance
2. Drop spindles allowing closer to stock geometry
3. Lower weight then stock style system

Lets assume cost is not an issue, but time is. As in, I don't want to wait for a complete custom front suspension to be designed and built. I would like to utilize products already being currently produced by vendors.
Is it going to make a big enough difference to justify the price over a max upgraded stock style system?
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Bloozberry
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Report this Post11-14-2013 06:58 AM Click Here to See the Profile for BloozberrySend a Private Message to BloozberryEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
For starters, you could make a world of difference by installing springs front to rear that more closely match the proportion of the weight distribution. In other words, your 350 lb/in front springs are too heavy for your 275 lb/in rear springs.
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fieroguru
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Report this Post11-14-2013 10:34 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fieroguruSend a Private Message to fieroguruEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Just remember that due to front spring placement, the actual spring rate at the front wheel will be much less than the same rate spring installed on the rear strut.
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Blacktree
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Report this Post11-14-2013 11:49 AM Click Here to See the Profile for BlacktreeClick Here to visit Blacktree's HomePageClick Here to Email BlacktreeSend a Private Message to BlacktreeEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
FYI, the front suspension geometry on the '84-87 Fieros isn't anything special. I wouldn't go through too much trouble trying to preserve it (as long as it isn't made any worse, hehe). Instead of using drop spindles, I'd prefer to use Rodney Dickman's lowering ball joints. They spread the control arms apart a bit, which should get you more camber gain in the turns.

I would also soften up the front springs a bit (maybe 300 lb/in), and trade up to a 1" front sway bar. But that's just me.

Also, Arraut Motorsports sells a kit (sport front suspension) with tubular control arms and coilover shocks. But to install it, you need to do some cutting and welding on the front crossmember. It's nothing really serious, but if you don't have access to a welder, it can be a problem.
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Report this Post11-14-2013 11:56 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BridgetownSend a Private Message to BridgetownEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Bloozberry:

For starters, you could make a world of difference by installing springs front to rear that more closely match the proportion of the weight distribution. In other words, your 350 lb/in front springs are too heavy for your 275 lb/in rear springs.


To be honest, I've tried a couple different spring rates over the years and I have found with the '86 front/'88 rear suspensions, a softer rear rate and a stiffer front rate has produced a pretty well balanced car with a descent ride. I am happy with the characteristics these rates produce near the limit. My car is prone to a balanced a predictable tendency to over steer near the limit. What I'm looking to do with the new upgrades is keep those same characteristics, but increase the threshold of grip to a higher limit. In other words, I like the way my suspension feels at the edge, I just want to increase the level of grip before I reach that limit.

One thing I didn't mention is that I am planning to increase the tire widths front and rear as well. I'd like to run 225 front and 265 rear
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