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Name for a part by runforestrun
Started on: 07-13-2013 12:55 AM
Replies: 15 (306 views)
Last post by: fierofool on 07-31-2013 06:23 PM
runforestrun
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Report this Post07-13-2013 12:55 AM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Does anyone know the name of the funky block off plate that the timing tab is attached to? I need a gasket for it and not sure what its called. I'm about to go on round 4 of replacing the timing cover gasket. I going with a new timing cover and oil pan gasket this time. I've had all I can take with this leak. New timing cover will take the possible bent cover out of the possible causes.
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Report this Post07-13-2013 01:20 AM Click Here to See the Profile for trotterlgClick Here to Email trotterlgSend a Private Message to trotterlgEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
What engine are you talking about?
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-13-2013 01:35 AM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Its a 84 fiero with a 2.5
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-13-2013 08:12 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
It's listed as 'Timing Indicator With Plate' in the parts book. GM part number 10031935 for cross reference.
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-13-2013 01:29 PM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Thanks for the info. Now I Just need to find a gasket for it.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-13-2013 05:40 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
You may have to make one out of gasket material. You can buy small rolls of it at the parts stores. Use the paper gasket material and stay away from the cork material.
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TONY_C
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Report this Post07-14-2013 10:31 PM Click Here to See the Profile for TONY_CSend a Private Message to TONY_CEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
The timing cover and oil pan on the Duke's do not use gaskets, they use silicone. I like to use Permatex Ultra Gray. You have to use a generous bead and make sure the surfaces of the covers are clean and straight. Put the timing cover on first and then install the oil pan making sure to put a large bead along the edge where the pan meets the timing cover.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-15-2013 12:19 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
You may want to look at the end of your crankshaft if you have the timing cover off. Old oil seals can cut a groove into the crankshaft and even a new seal won't stop it from leaking. A sleeve is available that gits over the end of the crankshaft, giving a smooth surface for the seal to ride against.
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-15-2013 12:58 AM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Is it possible to drop the oil pan with the motor in the car? Also does anyone know what year they started using a rubber gasket? It comes with the oil pan gasket. I'm considering drilling 4 small holes just so the rubber gasket will fit.
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-15-2013 02:14 AM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post

runforestrun

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Is it possible to drop the oil pan with the motor in the car? Also does anyone know what year they started using a rubber gasket? It comes with the oil pan gasket. I'm considering drilling 4 small holes just so the rubber gasket will fit.
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Fierology
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Report this Post07-15-2013 06:17 AM Click Here to See the Profile for FierologySend a Private Message to FierologyEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I believe that to take the oil pan off w/o removing engine you have to remove the cradle. This isn't a terribly difficult task, but it depends on the condition of your pivots/bushings/bolts for the cradle. To do this, you would use an engine support on the strut towers, unbolt the engine mounts and drop the cradle. You could possible just unbolt the back end and pivot it down on the front bolts. Again, someone might have an easier method, but I think this is the simplest way to remove the '84 duke oil pan. This way you would also have a little bit of wiggle-room to scoot the engine back and forth. (But be careful if your hard fuel lines are very rusted close to pivot points!)
I have some leaks on my '84 duke, too. I've had them since the rebuild, so, I clearly did a seal or two incorrectly. It's not a big leak, more of a seep. I'm interested to know where your leak is and how much.

And in response to fierofool, what's wrong with cork gaskets? I have one on my valve cover, and, I admit it does not seal well.

Good luck and all the best,
Michael
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-15-2013 09:24 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Fierology:

leak, more of a seep. I'm interested to know where your leak is and how much.

And in response to fierofool, what's wrong with cork gaskets? I have one on my valve cover, and, I admit it does not seal well.

Good luck and all the best,


I don't know if it's the seal area design of the sheet metal of the various part that go against the cork gaskets or something else, but the cork gaskets do tend to leak after a while. It's not just isolated to the Fiero, either.

Cork doesn't have the ability to compress the way modern day silicone rubber gaskets do. Add to that the tendency to over-tighten and the sealing ridges on the sheet metal part will compress enough to cut the gasket. so torqueing to spec is essential. If the oil pan could be taken to a machine shop and laid on a flat surface, check the pan's mating surface to be sure they're flat.

Before the rubber gaskets came into popular use, cork was the material of choice. Not the choice of the mechanic, but of the manufacturer. When I assembled anything using a cork gasket, I used Permatex Form-A-Gasket on both surfaces of the gasket. It held the gasket in place and it added some thickness and cushion to the new gasket.

I thought Rodney Dickman or The Fiero Store offered the crankshaft repair sleeve, but I couldn't find it on their sites. It's apparently still available at most auto parts stores should it be found that there's a groove in the crank end. .
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-16-2013 06:12 PM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I just find it odd that a rubber seal comes with the oil pan gasket set. The instructions say to use it if the timing cover has holes or use silicone if it doesn't have holes. I bought a new timing cover. I'm going to drill holes and see if the rubber gasket works better than a bunch of silicone.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-16-2013 08:32 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Some of the V8 engines use a rubber gasket on both ends of the lower intake. They work well. The Fiero V6 and other vehicles using the V6 use Silicone RTV in place of those end gaskets. RTV works just great if properly applied to clean, dry surfaces. I believe the rubber gasket you describe might be for use in other vehicles that had the Duke engine or variants of it.
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runforestrun
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Report this Post07-31-2013 03:09 PM Click Here to See the Profile for runforestrunSend a Private Message to runforestrunEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
My over kill method seems to be doing good. After using a rubber seal, silicone , and epoxy putty I guess the Fiero didn't want to find out what I'd try next. Which probably would have been roofing tar. I plan on a V8 swap when the timing gear goes again anyway. The next guy can worry about jackhammering the timing cover off.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-31-2013 06:23 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Glad you've got it going and can enjoy it again.
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