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Fieros are endangered? by Wichita
Started on: 06-10-2015 01:28 AM
Replies: 12 (446 views)
Last post by: jscott1 on 06-12-2015 08:39 PM
Wichita
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Report this Post06-10-2015 01:28 AM Click Here to See the Profile for WichitaClick Here to Email WichitaSend a Private Message to WichitaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
According to this website:

http://www.endangeredcars.com/


(4th one down from the list).

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mattwa
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Report this Post06-10-2015 01:58 AM Click Here to See the Profile for mattwaClick Here to Email mattwaSend a Private Message to mattwaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I really don't know why people believe some of these sites, I mean, the cars are on average 30 years old now, demand isn't exactly high, still seems to have a decent supply of them out there, parts are getting harder to find in some cases, but overall it still looks good.
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E.Furgal
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Report this Post06-10-2015 03:20 AM Click Here to See the Profile for E.FurgalSend a Private Message to E.FurgalEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I guess it depends on where you live, Here on thurs, one week there is a hugy show at the bass pro shop in Foxboro and the next at a dog track then bas then track,etc and I haven't seen another fiero at either.. and the bass shows/cruises are hundreds of cars most weeks 4-5 hundred
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jonrev
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Report this Post06-10-2015 05:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for jonrevClick Here to visit jonrev's HomePageClick Here to Email jonrevSend a Private Message to jonrevEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I think that's just the name of the guy's car spotting blog; there are a bunch of common classics featured on that site, too.
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hyperv6
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Report this Post06-10-2015 06:59 AM Click Here to See the Profile for hyperv6Send a Private Message to hyperv6Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Not sure what to make of this site as most of the cars here are not rare other than the trashy Euro models like the Lada and Fiats.

This car is not exactly perfect as the nose looks faded and the tail pipes have been replaced thought it is better than many. I am impressed he did say it was a 2M6 as most people would have never noted the difference in a 85 as the tail pipes and decal are the only give away.

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Dennis LaGrua
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Report this Post06-10-2015 03:39 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Dennis LaGruaClick Here to Email Dennis LaGruaSend a Private Message to Dennis LaGruaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
I've said if before and I'll say it again. If you believe all these articles written by no nothing automotive writers, there's no telling how screwed up you are going to get. Although Fieros were made in relatively small numbers, the very uniqueness of the vehicle with mid engine and urethane/fiberglass body parts has made the car into a cult classic and the "poor mans" Corvette. I would guestimate that 40%-50% of the Fieros that were manufactured still survive to this day. If there is a rare (but not one in heavy demand) Fiero it would have to be the 84 2M4. Such is the legacy of the 84 except for the one owned by Pete Bransky, the MAFOA tour director. He drives one that looks like it just left the showroom.
As for the GT models, I have never come across one on numerous visits to the junkyards throughout the years. I am sure that some GT's were scrapped but not all that many. I would venture to say that 70% remain in collectors hands.

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[This message has been edited by Dennis LaGrua (edited 06-10-2015).]

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Wichita
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Report this Post06-11-2015 01:25 AM Click Here to See the Profile for WichitaClick Here to Email WichitaSend a Private Message to WichitaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Dennis LaGrua:

I would venture to say that 70% remain in collectors hands.


That would seem awfully high to me. I would say 10% at best.

It would be difficult to confirm, but I would be reasonably sure that most Fiero's have been scrapped, crushed, smelted and sold to China as scrap metal.

At 70% still out, that would mean a quarter of a million Fieros still out there.

Generally the average life span of a car is around 10-years. And 10-million cars are scrapped every single year.

But according to this (not for sure of the accuracy, but around 10% of Pontiacs older than 20-years is still on the road.

[This message has been edited by Wichita (edited 06-11-2015).]

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Steel
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Report this Post06-11-2015 05:50 AM Click Here to See the Profile for SteelSend a Private Message to SteelEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Well considering most Fiero owners don't even take them out of the garage or the spot in their yard they last parked them in a decade ago.. probably aren't many on the roads no.

I see so many Fiero's on my daily commutes that are just sitting outside never moved.. year after year.

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hyperv6
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Report this Post06-11-2015 07:05 AM Click Here to See the Profile for hyperv6Send a Private Message to hyperv6Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
You can keep the charts as they do not apply here in this case so much.

The Fiero was for many and still is a second or third car and that is why there are still so many good examples. The fact is many did just not get used up in much the way we still have so many old Corvettes in near original condition.

The Fiero also so well in different regions and the mid west is one and that is also why most of the large national events have been here since 1984.

The Fiero is not like a car like say a 1985 Turbo Sunbird. Those cars were used up and few are left as they were daily drivers used sold and resold till noting was worth fixing anymore. I just saw a perfect example of a Turbo Sedan and it was the first one I had seen in decades in good or bad condition outside a junk year. Even in yard these cars have generally been scrapped out.

While we have lost a percentage of cars we still have a majority of the V6 cars and a good number of the 4 cylinders since so many were made. The Fiero was not a car made in small numbers it was pretty large for the time it was built and exspecially for a 2 seat car that normally sells in numbers less than 20K. The Fiero in the first year sold more cars than the Miata averages over many years here as they normally only sell on average 17K18K over the life of the car yearly.
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Formula88
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Report this Post06-11-2015 07:57 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Probably the biggest danger to the Fiero is they aren't widely considered collectible, so most people don't try to preserve them and they get crushed or parted out. That will dwindle the supply of Fiero-specific parts more quickly than just time itself. If someone sees a rusted hulk of a '57 Chevy or '71 Trans Am, they're going to try and save it. A Fiero in the same condition would get scrapped without a second thought.
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jscott1
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Report this Post06-11-2015 11:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for jscott1Send a Private Message to jscott1Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Formula88:

Probably the biggest danger to the Fiero is they aren't widely considered collectible, so most people don't try to preserve them and they get crushed or parted out. That will dwindle the supply of Fiero-specific parts more quickly than just time itself. If someone sees a rusted hulk of a '57 Chevy or '71 Trans Am, they're going to try and save it. A Fiero in the same condition would get scrapped without a second thought.



True... real collector cars will be salvaged in any condition. Yet Fieros are still scrapped without a second thought.
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hyperv6
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Report this Post06-12-2015 07:13 AM Click Here to See the Profile for hyperv6Send a Private Message to hyperv6Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Formula88:

Probably the biggest danger to the Fiero is they aren't widely considered collectible, so most people don't try to preserve them and they get crushed or parted out. That will dwindle the supply of Fiero-specific parts more quickly than just time itself. If someone sees a rusted hulk of a '57 Chevy or '71 Trans Am, they're going to try and save it. A Fiero in the same condition would get scrapped without a second thought.


Collectable cars of real value are generally saved that is a big difference.

Whole the Fiero may be collectable to some it's value due to supply and demand has kept prices low. Also the other issue is those who love the Fiero generally like it because of the low prices.

Many cars can be collectable but few are to the level of a 57 Chevy< GTO or the increasing in value Trans Am.

Also lets face it most 80's cars are still too young to be much of value yet. The GN or some really limited models like the GNX can see some value but ones even like the Syclone really are still good buys. The Z/28 and Trans Am of the same era are still good bargains as is most Mustang models.

I had a Chevelle SS and even a GMC Sprint SP with a Big Block and neither held much value till they got to 35 years old and many of the questionable models were used up. The Fiero is still a new kid on the block and everyone wants to make it into a instant classic and that is only something that time, demand and attrition can do.

If you want value there has to be less cars and more demand. Sorry but that is the way it goes. And to top that off cheap cars in junk yards are just not going to be there either.

Hell I remember in the 80's we would go in and pull the front clips off of 65 GTO's that were complete and in some what decent condition. Why because they were still cheap and only about 25 years old.

It is getting old as it is not just some Fiero people but most other make where they all are trying to create the next collector car as soon as it is built. This has lead to many cars just sitting in garages that make it easy years later to find a good example but it also depresses prices. Some of todays most values collector cars at sometime in their life held little value in general and often were either produced in small numbers or just not saved due to lack of interest.

The Daytona and Superbird were two examples that were hated when new and did not sell well. Another is the GTO Ferrari one of the most valuable cars in the world. It was a car that was considered by 1970 as just an old low volume used up race car. It was fragile and expensive to maintain because it was made to be fast in short burst and rebuilt. This lead to people like Nick Mason who bought one for under $8,000 around 1970 and with the now increased demand to values of $35 million plus dollars today.

We all need to get used to the idea as a car ages that there will be some less an we will not find them in junk yards. But we also much accept that this does not mean that values will increase a ton unless the market outside the Fiero collectors take an interest.

To be honest the Fiero has had a larger than normal group of collectors around it its whole life but that has also lead to many cars being preserved in great condition much more than the norm. This make it easier to find great models than most other makes out there that got used up. The nature of the Fiero as not being a daily driver also contributes to a greater number of excellent models out the.

You guys get excited when we have a national meet and get over 200 plus cars of one make. Now Segway to a GTO, Chevelle or even some national Camaro shows and they only may see 50-100 cars at best. This should tell you that there is demand but the number of affordable cars are still in greater numbers than most.

To gain value there is little anyone can do to change value outside buying up and destroying cars to create increased demand for less supply. That is something that generally happens naturally and with the Fiero it will be a slower process due to the number of cars and collectors of the car it has had its entire life.

Just because we count people on this forum there are still a majority of owners not on this site to.

Many just need to relax and let things take their course. As with any collector car buy it because you like it and then even if the value lottery may not hit you still have a car you like.

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jscott1
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Report this Post06-12-2015 08:39 PM Click Here to See the Profile for jscott1Send a Private Message to jscott1Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by hyperv6:

Many just need to relax and let things take their course. As with any collector car buy it because you like it and then even if the value lottery may not hit you still have a car you like.


This is why I daily drive my Indy... don't see it being extremely valuable in my lifetime. For you younger folks on here, I nearly totaled it twice this month, so over time there will be less Fieros, guaranteed.
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