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Changing Spark Plugs & Wires 2.8 88 GT Fiero by jon2009
Started on: 07-19-2014 04:10 PM
Replies: 19 (1435 views)
Last post by: Patrick on 07-20-2014 10:26 PM
jon2009
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Report this Post07-19-2014 04:10 PM Click Here to See the Profile for jon2009Send a Private Message to jon2009Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Hi Guys,

i consider my self quite handy. I wanted to change the spark plugs on my own and the wires. I have all the parts ready. I wanted to know if someone can give me a break down or a tutorial on how to replace the spark plugs. Especially the ones at the back of the engine. The wires are straight forward, replace them one by one. I need a detailed explanation on how remove the spark plugs at the back and front.

Thanks for the help.

[This message has been edited by jon2009 (edited 07-19-2014).]

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Fiero84Freak
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Report this Post07-19-2014 05:23 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Fiero84FreakClick Here to Email Fiero84FreakSend a Private Message to Fiero84FreakEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
They're not hard to change out. Seriously. When I change them I remove the decklid, and on my ratchet use a six inch extension. Removing the decklid gives a little more reach room, and the six inch extension will put ratchets right above the valve cover.

Spray the plugs with a penetrant and let them sit overnight before you attempt to remove them. If you have access to compressed air, use it to blow around the plugs to push the crud put.

Some people can reach their hands behind there without removing the decklid, but my hands are a bit large and I don't like busting up my hand.

[This message has been edited by Fiero84Freak (edited 07-19-2014).]

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Kitskaboodle
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Report this Post07-19-2014 09:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for KitskaboodleClick Here to Email KitskaboodleSend a Private Message to KitskaboodleEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Deck lid removal not necessary. Doing it by feel works for me. Misc extensions and hand/ palm ratchet are helpful. Always use anti-seize on plug threads. I prefer NGK copper plugs any day of the week. Lastly, please do not lean on the trunk seal while doing the back plugs. You will end up cutting/tearing it. Put a towel on the plenum and lean on that instead.
Kit
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Kevin87FieroGT
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Report this Post07-19-2014 10:07 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Kevin87FieroGTSend a Private Message to Kevin87FieroGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Always put antisieze on your new plugs before install, there may be a next time. The silver type works fine, cooper color is also ok. Pick it up at your parts store or hardware.
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Formula88
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Report this Post07-20-2014 12:25 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
If you have a friend to help you lift off the deck lid, I find that the easiest way. It makes reaching the forward plugs MUCH easier, IMO, especially if you have big hands.
It's real easy to line up the deck lid when putting it back on. Just leave the engine vents on either side off, and you can finger tighten the bolts, then gently close the lid and nudge it exactly where you want it and then tighten the bolts while the deck lid is closed.

Something else to watch out for - the forward plugs tend to collect leaves and debris that come down in the gap between the deck lid and rear window. After taking the plug wire off, try to blow our or clean around the plug as best you can. It'll keep crap from falling into the cylinder when the plug comes out and make it easier to get the spark plug socket on the plug.
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Ayrow
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Report this Post07-20-2014 03:47 AM Click Here to See the Profile for AyrowClick Here to visit Ayrow's HomePageClick Here to Email AyrowSend a Private Message to AyrowEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Removing the deck lid is not necessary, but man does it help. It is worth the trouble.
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Patrick
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Report this Post07-20-2014 04:12 AM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Ayrow:

Removing the deck lid is not necessary, but man does it help. It is worth the trouble.


Yeah, especially if you have a decklid which still has the recall strip installed on the front edge. It sticks down when the decklid is open and gets in the way.

After disconnecting the ground wire, unplugging the wiring harness, and removing the four bolts holding the decklid to the hinges, I stand in the trunk and lift the decklid up and onto the roof (protected by a big chunk of corrugated cardboard).
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steve308
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Report this Post07-20-2014 07:40 AM Click Here to See the Profile for steve308Send a Private Message to steve308Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Good Luck !


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hyperv6
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Report this Post07-20-2014 08:25 AM Click Here to See the Profile for hyperv6Send a Private Message to hyperv6Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
A swivel long handle ratchet is your friend. and a normal socket with a short extension.

There is no need to remove a deck lid or anything other than the side covers.

Might spray oil in and let it soak a little before you remove them if they are rusted.

The plugs are not hard to change and you just have to work with out looking at them. The only real pain is if they are rusted in because they have not been out for a while. Now if they have been out or If the car is not out in the weather there really is little issue with rust.

Now if they are rusted in as it could be the biggest issue you face if they break off in there.

To be honest these are far from the worst plugs I have ever changed and to me is a bigger pain to remove the deck lid and risk paint damage.

Just get the long handled swivel ratchet. note most have a slight bend in it and it makes all the difference in the world. Mine is a old SK I have had for years to do plugs. the longer handle gives leverage and the bend clearance and the swivel a better angle.

This is a matter just for the right tool and if it is that hard then you don't have the right tool. Invest in the ratchet and it helps a lot.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-20-2014 08:30 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Whether you remove the decklid or not, I'd pretty much agree with Formula88 except for the anti-sieze. I like to use dielectric grease liberally squirted into the spark plug boots. It's an electrical insulator and can help prevent tracking down the sides of the plug insulator. It doesn't turn to a putty-like consistency like anti-sieze.

Put your feet in the bottom of the trunk, sit on the tail light ledge and you can lean over the engine with one hand around either side of the engine to feel the plugs. Much better than laying across the car on your belly.

If you have the metal insulators on the boots, give them a couple of back and forth twists before trying to pull them off. Helps to keep from breaking the boots off on the plug. A piece of broken boot remaining on the plug can cause great difficulty in getting your plug wrench onto the plug. I generally use a standard ratchet, a 3 or 4 inch extension and a plug wrench. I have the weather strip on my decklids and I never remove the decklid.
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Kevin87FieroGT
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Report this Post07-20-2014 09:35 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Kevin87FieroGTSend a Private Message to Kevin87FieroGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Just to clarify. Anitisieze only on the plug threads, a small amount works. Dielectric grease, only a small amount, inside the plug wire boot before install. Have fun, it's not that difficult a job.
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Old Lar
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Report this Post07-20-2014 11:31 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Old LarSend a Private Message to Old LarEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
PB blaster on the plugs if they have been in a while as the plugs tend to rust in place. Don't force or you can break the ceramics on the plugs. Anti seize on the threads and dielectric on the plug wires connection.
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lateFormula
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Report this Post07-20-2014 11:50 AM Click Here to See the Profile for lateFormulaSend a Private Message to lateFormulaEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
One thing that is rarely mentioned about changing spark plugs on the V6 is that if you can get your car up on jackstands approximately 18 inches in the air, you can change the front ones from under the car. If you do it from under the car you are not doing the job completely blind (compared to from the top without removing the deck lid).

Something to consider. Oh and I would also highly recommend anti-seize on the threads and dielectric grease on the plug boots.
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Patrick
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Report this Post07-20-2014 02:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

I'd pretty much agree with Formula88 except for the anti-sieze. I like to use dielectric grease liberally squirted into the spark plug boots. It's an electrical insulator and can help prevent tracking down the sides of the plug insulator. It doesn't turn to a putty-like consistency like anti-sieze.


Funny how people can sometimes totally misinterpret things.

Where'd you get the idea that Formula88, or anybody for that matter, had suggested using anti-seize inside the spark plug boots?
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css9450
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Report this Post07-20-2014 03:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for css9450Click Here to Email css9450Send a Private Message to css9450Edit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Kevin87FieroGT:

Just to clarify. Anitisieze only on the plug threads, a small amount works.


LOL There's a video on Youtube where a guy applies what looks like most of an entire tube of antisieze to each plug! Its way too much! Then of course it gets all over his hands and tools too... I'd post a link but its near the end of about 20 minutes of preparation. Not a Fiero though.

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fierofool
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Report this Post07-20-2014 05:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Patrick:

Funny how people can sometimes totally misinterpret things.

Where'd you get the idea that Formula88, or anybody for that matter, had suggested using anti-seize inside the spark plug boots?


OK, OK, so it was early in the morning for me and everybody's posts were running together. I was in a rush to get ready for church, read things quickly and ran some posts together. Anti-sieze (just a little) on the threads and enough dielectric grease inside the boot to help keep out water. Decklid removal is an option. Standing in the trunk is much easier on the chest and belly than laying across the engine.

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Patrick
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Report this Post07-20-2014 05:20 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

OK, OK, so it was early in the morning for me and everybody's posts were running together. I was in a rush to get ready for church, read things quickly and ran some posts together.


And the dog ate the newspaper, etc. No problem, just teasing you.

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Kevin87FieroGT
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Report this Post07-20-2014 10:03 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Kevin87FieroGTSend a Private Message to Kevin87FieroGTEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Sometimes you got to laugh at this stuff. Geeeezzzz.
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fierofool
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Report this Post07-20-2014 10:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofoolClick Here to visit fierofool's HomePageClick Here to Email fierofoolSend a Private Message to fierofoolEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
Agreed! If we laughed more at this stuff, we'd have many more old timers and there'd be no need for the Trash Can. I didn't take it the wrong way, Patrick.

[This message has been edited by fierofool (edited 07-20-2014).]

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Patrick
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Report this Post07-20-2014 10:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PatrickClick Here to Email PatrickSend a Private Message to PatrickEdit/Delete MessageReply w/QuoteDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by fierofool:

I didn't take it the wrong way, Patrick.


I know what you're like, so I didn't suspect you had... but strangely enough, not everyone has a sense of humor (which is really unfortunate). I've got a lot of negs from those people.
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