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Decent welder to learn with? by Steel
Started on: 08-26-2011 10:26 PM
Replies: 7
Last post by: JazzMan on 08-29-2011 07:19 PM
Steel
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Report this Post08-26-2011 10:26 PM Click Here to See the Profile for SteelSend a Private Message to SteelDirect Link to This Post
I'm hoping to learn how to weld, at least be good enough to tack together my own exhaust tubing, 1/8" - 1/4" steel and even some sheet metal if possible.. then i could take what I tacked together to a pro to be finished.

I have 220 in my shop I just installed this past week. I'm not looking for top of the line, just something half way decent that I can learn on. Point me in the right direction please~ Also if there are any DVD's, books or anything worth following to learn I'd consider those as well.
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Niterrorz
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Report this Post08-26-2011 10:30 PM Click Here to See the Profile for NiterrorzSend a Private Message to NiterrorzDirect Link to This Post
i bought a $300 mig welder from menards and practiced on scrap with flux core shieled wire so i didnt have to buy gas.....oddly enough im told flux core is hard to weld with but i didnt have a problem learning i probably ahve a few thousand hours into welding in the past five years and while my welds are not as good looking as they could be or would be with a gas shielded wire i find that the actually steel pieces break before my welds.

edited to add.

mine was a 110v your 220 can probably handle 1/2 steel. all i can say is just practice on scrap you can see all the videos in the world and read al lthe books but untill you actually do it youll never really get the feel for it. the thinner the metal the lower the power and always overlap your welds. when your welding a bead go down a few centemeters then back up over your weld then back down or go in a circular motion. to hot will burn though to cold will not hold. the key is penetration without blowing out the weld.

[This message has been edited by Niterrorz (edited 08-26-2011).]

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fierowitch
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Report this Post08-27-2011 12:39 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierowitchSend a Private Message to fierowitchDirect Link to This Post
any of the good brand names are always dependable and work well when you get the 240 volt ones. Nick, fierofetish just bought a china made one he loves so far, was cheap as well, inexpensive. if you want portability as well as 240/220 volt lincon has a great SP-180T MIG Welder that is no bigger than the 110 units and will hold its own against the big boys, shop size ones if you need the portability. it will weld al, steel, with or without gas.

http://www.lincolnelectric....aspx?product=K2689-1

been a welder for 20 years, 15 heavy industrial construction and used just about every make and model made.
find yourself a adult education course at any local high school, the prices are usually not bad, you have an instructor on hand, all the equipment you could ever want, that is my best advise for anyone who wants to learn.
Steve

------------------
My other vehicle is a broom.

[This message has been edited by fierowitch (edited 08-27-2011).]

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FieroReinke
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Report this Post08-27-2011 07:38 PM Click Here to See the Profile for FieroReinkeClick Here to Email FieroReinkeSend a Private Message to FieroReinkeDirect Link to This Post
I recently bought a Hobart 140 and am very pleased with it. I also bought three for my mechanics at work. They love the portability over the 480v welders we have at the plant. I can honestly say they can weld 1/4". I can not do it but my mechanics have.

I started out practicing on scrap pieces but what really helped was an hour with an experienced welder watching me weld and giving me pointers.

[This message has been edited by FieroReinke (edited 08-27-2011).]

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Dodgerunner
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Report this Post08-27-2011 09:33 PM Click Here to See the Profile for DodgerunnerClick Here to visit Dodgerunner's HomePageClick Here to Email DodgerunnerSend a Private Message to DodgerunnerDirect Link to This Post
The latest Popular Mechanics mag just had a comparision of about 6 welders and gives you some ideas of what does what.
I happen to have the Miller which was tops in their review but of course the highest priced also.

Don't know if the artical is on their web site, I'll have to take a look. Otherwise your local library might have a copy.


http://www.popularmechanics...295636?click=main_sr

[This message has been edited by Dodgerunner (edited 08-27-2011).]

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gusshotrod
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Report this Post08-28-2011 04:41 AM Click Here to See the Profile for gusshotrodClick Here to Email gusshotrodSend a Private Message to gusshotrodDirect Link to This Post
There are a lot that will work. Get a name brand if you ever want to sell it.
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Dodgerunner
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Report this Post08-28-2011 12:03 PM Click Here to See the Profile for DodgerunnerClick Here to visit Dodgerunner's HomePageClick Here to Email DodgerunnerSend a Private Message to DodgerunnerDirect Link to This Post
Some of the big differences are the current and speed controls, sustained power capacity and tip contact area.

Cheaper ones have stepped/click speed and current settings while better ones are variable.
Better ones maintain their power output on long welds, cheaper ones the power output drops off as the transformer heats up.
A biggy is the tip electrode contact area. You want more contact with the wire to transfer power to the weld and maintain the arc. If there is less you get arcing inside the tip contact which affects the welds, causes heat and shortens the life of the tips. A good "stinger" make a big difference in weld quality and life of the welder.

[This message has been edited by Dodgerunner (edited 08-28-2011).]

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JazzMan
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Report this Post08-29-2011 07:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for JazzManClick Here to Email JazzManSend a Private Message to JazzManDirect Link to This Post
I would suggest seeing if the local community college offers welding courses, and taking some of them as non-credit. I'm working on a degree in welding at my local college and have found the equipment and instruction to be fantastic.

As to brand, I recommend Miller, but any of the name brands such as Miller, Hobart, Lincoln will be good.

[This message has been edited by JazzMan (edited 08-30-2011).]

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