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Tech School... man I hate thinking about this. by chriswf
Started on: 05-19-2011 08:31 PM
Replies: 7
Last post by: ghost187x on 05-19-2011 09:47 PM
chriswf
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Report this Post05-19-2011 08:31 PM Click Here to See the Profile for chriswfClick Here to Email chriswfSend a Private Message to chriswfDirect Link to This Post
I hate my current job. And it's a job. Not a career I wish to pursue, simply because in order to advance--- they have to train you on "how-to fire someone", by actually firing them. Every time management jobs are offered I turn them down ASAP. I won't ditch any of my friends at work for a promo.

The company has been shifty in other areas, and I'd rather advance in a field relating to cars.
Preferably a tech/mechanical job, or even paint/body. Eventually go more advanced with it. My own body shop or racing team/shop.

Anyway, I'm unsure if anyone has read any of my other posts. But I've done a bit with cars already. All the knowledge I've learned is through forum searching or experience under the hood. Most jobs I try to pursue want a real experience in the field before they hire me, AND/OR ASE certifications. And body shops just won't hire shop hands in Texas I guess because cheap labor is easy to obtain in Texas.

--I have no experience in body work, and I can't even weld. They slightly taught us once in a body shop class that was shut down in highschool, but welding and minor dent popping is almost memories lost.

--I'm quite mechanically inclined though. I've done 2 custom motor swaps, and 1 factory motor swap. Wired cars, and done almost everything under the hood in repairs except for rods/pistons/crank and actual head work.
Replaced every gasket a car has at least once. Alt, distributor(and parts), tune ups, fuel pump, starters and everything in between.
But no A/C work aside from a R12 to 134? conversion on my 89 probe GT.


So, this turns me towards some form of schooling to get me somewhere. I guess, right?
Within a 30 minute drive of my home in Plano, I have ATI and UTI (to my knowledge, if others exist let me know!)
I went to visit ATI a few weeks ago, where I snapped a shot of a Fiero from the front window.
If this is your Fiero at this light on Kingsley and Shiloh, I gotta say "NOICE!"



Anyway, I heard a lot of bad things about ATI the more I read into it. And someone was telling me the course is really directed towards people who know absolutely nothing about cars, and for 24,000$... It won't put you very far except with an ASE certification in your hands. ATI only offers a mechanics/technicians course.

The other option, just as equally far in distance, is UTI. I've only read bad reviews on it. But who writes a good review? Something has to be breathtaking for someone to go out of their way to write a good review. I have not stopped by the school yet.
As far as I know, UTI offers both mechanical and body work courses.


I'm ready to listen to any opinions you have, experience, advice, whatever.

Anything you say will be taken seriously. Even if you say something like "Tech schools are for retards, don't go".
It's a serious decision I'm considering to make. Either now/soon... Or after my wife get's out of school which is in a year.


Also, I've applied at CCC(Calipers I think it's called), Service King, and Maaco (I think it was Maaco.....).
Anyway, I've heard those 3 have in company training/promoting. What better deal than to work and learn.
But, no good so far. I've also applied multiple times to Service King and Calipers, and spoke with their workers too. Just no good yet.

So yeah, drop some info down if you got a sec. I'd love some advice.
Body or mechanics, I just love working with cars in general.


Thanks!
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chriswf
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Report this Post05-19-2011 08:32 PM Click Here to See the Profile for chriswfClick Here to Email chriswfSend a Private Message to chriswfDirect Link to This Post

chriswf

406 posts
Member since Jan 2011
I just realized how much I typed... Sorry.
90+wpm can make a quick mess :P
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RWDPLZ
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Report this Post05-19-2011 08:42 PM Click Here to See the Profile for RWDPLZClick Here to visit RWDPLZ's HomePageSend a Private Message to RWDPLZDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by chriswf:

except with an ASE certification in your hands

Thanks!


No it won't, ASE requires 2 years experience to get certification in a given field, of which up to 1 year of school can be substituted for the work experience requirement.

You can take the ASE tests at any time, but even if you pass, you won't get the certification until you have the work experience.

http://www.ase.com/Content/...nce_Requirements.htm

I know a guy who went to Wyotech, poor bastard is working at an Auto Zone right now to pay the school bills.
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chriswf
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Report this Post05-19-2011 08:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for chriswfClick Here to Email chriswfSend a Private Message to chriswfDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by RWDPLZ:


No it won't, ASE requires 2 years experience to get certification in a given field, of which up to 1 year of school can be substituted for the work experience requirement.

You can take the ASE tests at any time, but even if you pass, you won't get the certification until you have the work experience.

http://www.ase.com/Content/...nce_Requirements.htm

I know a guy who went to Wyotech, poor bastard is working at an Auto Zone right now to pay the school bills.


That doesn't make sense to me why they'd do it that way! I hear you learn more in a shop in a week than you can in 6 weeks of school.
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Flamberge
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Report this Post05-19-2011 09:03 PM Click Here to See the Profile for FlambergeSend a Private Message to FlambergeDirect Link to This Post
Take it from someone who went to a school that they run commercials for during daytime TV: Go to a real college. Get a real education.You still might not find a real job, but you will be better off. EVERY single alum I know from my school's different locations are all working entry level BS jobs and working on their dream in their spare time.

I'm not saying tech schools, UTI, DeVry, Phoenix, Art Institutes, ITT, etc etc can't equip you with marketable skills and/or knowledge, but they aren't geared towards getting you a job after you graduate (regardless of what the admissions recruiters say). They are geared towards growing their student base as much as possible.

If you know you want to work on cars, maybe find a mom and pop shop you can cut your teeth in. Offer to do tires, oil changes, brake jobs, etc and work your way into their confidence. After two years, get your certification and either stay on with your new shop or try to find somewhere else to work. And I'm not talking about a franchise oil change type place, I mean a real legitimate small auto mechanic operation.

A place like this:

edit: image is from Google.com to state the obvious.

[This message has been edited by Flamberge (edited 05-19-2011).]

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Formula88
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Report this Post05-19-2011 09:13 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Direct Link to This Post
If you want to learn a vocation, community college or tech school is fine.
Welding, HVAC service, plumbing, electrician, etc., and most have automotive curriculum, too.

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chriswf
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Report this Post05-19-2011 09:36 PM Click Here to See the Profile for chriswfClick Here to Email chriswfSend a Private Message to chriswfDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Flamberge:

Take it from someone who went to a school that they run commercials for during daytime TV: Go to a real college. Get a real education.You still might not find a real job, but you will be better off. EVERY single alum I know from my school's different locations are all working entry level BS jobs and working on their dream in their spare time.

I'm not saying tech schools, UTI, DeVry, Phoenix, Art Institutes, ITT, etc etc can't equip you with marketable skills and/or knowledge, but they aren't geared towards getting you a job after you graduate (regardless of what the admissions recruiters say). They are geared towards growing their student base as much as possible.

If you know you want to work on cars, maybe find a mom and pop shop you can cut your teeth in. Offer to do tires, oil changes, brake jobs, etc and work your way into their confidence. After two years, get your certification and either stay on with your new shop or try to find somewhere else to work. And I'm not talking about a franchise oil change type place, I mean a real legitimate small auto mechanic operation.

A place like this:

edit: image is from Google.com to state the obvious.



Okay okay, taking in what you say... I should start out in a small shop, and work my way up from there. I talked to 2 guys today at lunch who work at Allison's? Shop here in Plano somewhere. I asked if they were hiring (no), then I asked - when they ARE hiring, do they look for certifications -- And they replied "no, they want experience and knowledge".

There's a few small shops around where I live. I may try them.

I have lots of experience in networking, so if it were about money - college wouldn't be my approach. It's really about me being happy and accomplished at the end of the day. Yeah networking can rake me in big money, but it's not worth putting up with the corporate world and an extremely repetitive/boring job. Sitting in a desk just is not me anymore.
 
quote
Originally posted by Formula88:

If you want to learn a vocation, community college or tech school is fine.
Welding, HVAC service, plumbing, electrician, etc., and most have automotive curriculum, too.


Yeah I got a friend in HVAC at ATI. He said it's stressful going to school there because of the other kids in the class. Wasted an entire day talking about how you can lose your hand on the job and stuff. He feels as if he's the only one who wants to learn sometimes. Which his stories about stuff that happens in school, are the ones that have me turning down ATI right now.

[This message has been edited by chriswf (edited 05-19-2011).]

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ghost187x
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Report this Post05-19-2011 09:47 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ghost187xSend a Private Message to ghost187xDirect Link to This Post
a lot of community colleges offer automotive classes that most people seek. I suggest going the college route. Get an education so you can perform your trade well.
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