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Any Engineers Out There? by RWDPLZ
Started on: 10-31-2006 02:04 PM
Replies: 14
Last post by: Formula88 on 11-01-2006 12:58 PM
RWDPLZ
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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:04 PM Click Here to See the Profile for RWDPLZClick Here to visit RWDPLZ's HomePageSend a Private Message to RWDPLZDirect Link to This Post
The past few days have been the start of registration for classes for the next semester. But I had no idea what classes I need to take. So to make a long story short, it turns out when I transfered here, I was placed in the Mechanical Engineering Technology (BSMET) curriculum, instead of Mechanical Engineering (BSME).

I finally found a list of required classes for each, and the BSMET looks a bit easier, which worries me. Is the BSMET as good a degree as a BSME? What exactly is the difference? What is the difference in the jobs they do, and what they get paid?

For example, I want to design cars and automotive components for GM or Toyota or Delphi etc. Would I be able to do this with a BSMET? Or what jobs would a BSMET typically do in these companies? AND are BSMET's able to become professional engineers?

Any help appreciated. I haven't been able to get ahold of anyone at the school here in the past two days.

Thanks!

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whadeduck
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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:16 PM Click Here to See the Profile for whadeduckClick Here to Email whadeduckSend a Private Message to whadeduckDirect Link to This Post
Not 100% sure, but I know in a lot of cases, the difference between a regular engineering degree and a tech. degree is you may not be able to get licensed with a tech. degree. If that's what you want to ultimately do.

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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:21 PM Click Here to See the Profile for CkydmkSend a Private Message to CkydmkDirect Link to This Post
Im in an engineering course up here, and the course I'm taking will not get me an engineering degree, so I'll have to go to another school to get the piece of paper that says I'm an engineer. That might be your case too.
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ryan.hess
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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:31 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ryan.hessClick Here to Email ryan.hessSend a Private Message to ryan.hessDirect Link to This Post
Very generally speaking, the "ET" coursework focuses on real world problems, where the "E" coursework focuses on theory. That's what I gathered from the talk I had with the guidance guy...

If you go with the "ET", you won't have to worry about a lot of the calculus and differential equations and all that... Look into salaries for either, or ask on an engineering forum... "ET"s make less money... how much depends on your area/field/moon phase, but really any 4 year degree in engineering will make you some decent money.

Besides all that, it's just a piece of paper to your employer... What you can do determines your worth to them.
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whadeduck
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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:34 PM Click Here to See the Profile for whadeduckClick Here to Email whadeduckSend a Private Message to whadeduckDirect Link to This Post
Check on your state's requirements. They're different in each one. Most states won't look at a degree if it's not accredited by the right people. If your program's not accredited, don't waste your time. Find one that is. At the very least, if the program's accredited, it should be transferrable from state to state. Don't go for "easy" just because it looks that way. That may hurt you in the long run.

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Formula88
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Report this Post10-31-2006 02:59 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Direct Link to This Post
Most jobs I see for BSMEs specifically state that an "Engineering Technology" degree doesn't meet there requirements. It would typically be more for a hands on tech than a designer.

If you get the BSME, you can probalby go with jobs for either degree.
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Report this Post10-31-2006 03:01 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Direct Link to This Post

Formula88

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quote
Originally posted by ryan.hess:

Besides all that, it's just a piece of paper to your employer... What you can do determines your worth to them.


That's not true for engineering. You have to have a recognized, accredited degree to be able to get your Professional Engineer's license. Without a PE, you aren't an engineer for all practical purposes - you're just a technically educated dude who works under other engineers.

If the ASME doesn't recognize the college or the degree - run away.
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ryan.hess
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Report this Post10-31-2006 04:36 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ryan.hessClick Here to Email ryan.hessSend a Private Message to ryan.hessDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Formula88:
That's not true for engineering. You have to have a recognized, accredited degree to be able to get your Professional Engineer's license. Without a PE, you aren't an engineer for all practical purposes - you're just a technically educated dude who works under other engineers.

If the ASME doesn't recognize the college or the degree - run away.


Well yes, but if you get a degree from a 2 year college called "Tech America USA", you probably deserve what's coming....
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RWDPLZ
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Report this Post10-31-2006 06:38 PM Click Here to See the Profile for RWDPLZClick Here to visit RWDPLZ's HomePageSend a Private Message to RWDPLZDirect Link to This Post
The college is Michigan Technological University. I'm overpaying a LOT for this damn degree, $9,000 a semester, where I could get a years education at community college for $3000. I still haven't heard from anyone I phoned or emailed. The degree is ABET accredited, not sure about ASME.

BSMET:
http://www.tech.mtu.edu/TMET/

classes:
http://www.tech.mtu.edu/TMET/documents/TMET2006_08.pdf

I think the info I was looking for is here, which if I'm reading it right means a BSMET can't be a professional engineer in Michigan?
http://www.tech.mtu.edu/TMET/REGISTRATION.pdf

Comparing this to the BSME degree requirements:

BSME:
http://www.me.mtu.edu/

classes:
http://www.me.mtu.edu/academics/undergrads/degree_req.html

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Formula88
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Report this Post10-31-2006 08:33 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Direct Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by RWDPLZ:

BSMET:
http://www.tech.mtu.edu/TMET/


For $9000 a semester you can get pretty much any degree you want - so make sure you study what you want to study.

According to this link you posted, a BSMET can become a PE in 38 states, so it is much more limited than a BSME. Using NC as an example (since I'm familiar with NC regs) you have to have 8 years experience before you can take the PE exam. With a BSME, you can take the Engineer In Training (EIT) your Senior year and take the PE after you graduate.

Ask yourself why you're considering the BSMET instead of the BSME. Because it's easier, right? Prospective employers will know that, too.
This is a scientific degree - not liberal arts. Don't take any shortcuts - you'll only hurt yourself in the long run.

[This message has been edited by Formula88 (edited 10-31-2006).]

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ryan.hess
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Report this Post10-31-2006 08:51 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ryan.hessClick Here to Email ryan.hessSend a Private Message to ryan.hessDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Engineering and engineering technology are recognized as distinct points on the technical occupational spectrum. For example, ABET’s accreditation criteria defines engineering as “the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences gained by study, experience, and practice is applied with judgment to develop ways to use economically the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of mankind.” Engineering technology is defined as “that part of the technological field that requires the application of scientific and engineering knowledge and methods combined with technical skills in support of engineering activities; it lies in the occupational spectrum between the craftsman and the engineer at the end of the spectrum closest to the engineer.” In other words, the engineer is the person who conceives the design, while the engineering technologist is the person who implements it.
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Report this Post10-31-2006 09:46 PM Click Here to See the Profile for sandersonClick Here to Email sandersonSend a Private Message to sandersonDirect Link to This Post
I'm a ChE but I can tell you that you will have many more job opportunities with a BSME than a BSMET and the starting salary will be signifiacntly higher. If in doubt go talk to the job placement office at MTU.
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pollock
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Report this Post11-01-2006 11:06 AM Click Here to See the Profile for pollockSend a Private Message to pollockDirect Link to This Post
I have a BSMET degree.

In BSMET, you won't have to take as many math courses. You will probably take the same science courses (physics, chemistry, etc). You will still take many of the same courses in engineering, although the focus will be a little different. Instead of learning how a formula is derived, you will be given a formula and learn how to use it in different applications. You will spend time in the lab gaining hands-on experience... machining, fluids, welding, CAD, etc.

The main thing you want to look for is the ABET accreditation. Without that, you definitely won't be able to get a PE.

That said, I don't have a PE, and don't have any plans to get one. Generally speaking, w/ an ET degree you may have to get a few more years of work experience prior to taking the PE exam. Check your state's Board of Engineering policies.

My starting salary was higher than any of my friends that got BSME or BSCE (civil). Did I get lucky? Hard to say, but I have seen some stats showing that ET majors start at a higher salary.

Engineering in general is so varied with regard to different industries. I don't know much about the automotive engineering industry, except for the Peterbilt plant here in Denton, TX..... they love BSMET's. Half the people I graduated with went to work there. I strongly recommend you talk to several different people in the industry, preferably some w/ BSME and some w/ BSMET.

For the most part, your career is what you make it. I have a close friend from high school w/ a BSME degree, from a college that is better-known for engineering. We have worked together at several different companies, and I've consistently been "ahead" of him on the job.

Don't let the word of any one person scare you away from either BSME or BSMET.

[This message has been edited by pollock (edited 11-01-2006).]

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ryan.hess
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Report this Post11-01-2006 12:55 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ryan.hessClick Here to Email ryan.hessSend a Private Message to ryan.hessDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by pollock:
I have a close friend from high school w/ a BSME degree, from a college that is better-known for engineering. We have worked together at several different companies, and I've consistently been "ahead" of him on the job.

Don't let the word of any one person scare you away from either BSME or BSMET.


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Formula88
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Report this Post11-01-2006 12:58 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Formula88Send a Private Message to Formula88Direct Link to This Post
Good advice Polluck! It's good to see some feedback from someone who actually has the degree.
My thinking was the BSME can probably go both ways, while the BSMET might be limited - but again, that depends on where you plan to go with your career.

I'd recommend getting the PE, though. It can only help. Once you have the school and experience, it's just taking a test.
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