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Welders/Fabricators - Let's Tap That Brainbox! by Boondawg
Started on: 04-22-2006 06:05 AM
Replies: 8
Last post by: Boondawg on 04-22-2006 04:43 PM
Boondawg
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Report this Post04-22-2006 06:05 AM Click Here to See the Profile for BoondawgClick Here to Email BoondawgSend a Private Message to BoondawgDirect Link to This Post
I know there are some really excellent Welders/Fabricators here.
I've seen the proof!

I weld.
I've welded plate, pipe, and all kinds of odd steel things.
I'm not the best, but I can getter' done fairly strong and smooth.
I've cut and welded some pretty odd geomitrys.
I can build a custom welding jig.
I've bent pipe.
Not complex or even great, for that matter.

So how hard is it to bend & weld-up a custom motorcycle frame?
How hard can something like this be?:


I think I could design and weld up something atleast as good as this:


And I know I could be a little more creative!:


The same frame painted:


A different frame:
I mean, minus the fueltank, fender, seat and oiltank, the frame is fairly basic. Right?:



So, how hard is it, actually?
Has any of you guys ever done it?
What kind of pipe do you use?
What kind of welding medium?



And on the side, here's a strange picture I found.
I don't know if it's a painting, a drawing, a carving, a picture, or what.
It was simply titled: Woodcycle:

[This message has been edited by Boondawg (edited 04-22-2006).]

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Jake_Dragon
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Report this Post04-22-2006 07:33 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Jake_DragonSend a Private Message to Jake_DragonDirect Link to This Post
http://www.realclassic.co.uk/books/books06020200.html
I found several books just google "how to build your own motorcycle"

You should learn to tig weld, it will give you greater control of the weld and if you get good enough you wont have to clean them up when youre done.

Seems to me there are several points that you would need to pay the most attention to.
Wheels - I would not get too aggressive the first time out and put the wheels close to stock. It all depends on what your after.
Front forks - If this is a bike your going to ride a lot you probably dont want a lot of rake
Fuel tank - unless you plan on spending a lot of time learning how to build your own you should pick it early it will effect how you build your frame
Are you going to make it rigid? or try and do a swing arm?
Motor - You will probably want to make a jig for the motor, make a plate with all of the mounting points on it and use it as a jig to make sure your motor will fit as you weld up the frame.

I dont know anything about building bikes, but I worked in the welding field for over 15 years and was pretty good at it. If I ever retire I will probably open or work in a shop part time, it all depends on where I am in 20 years.
Move to Florida and we can open our own shop, your rich right

Good luck hope you have fun and dont hurt yourself
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84fiero123
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Report this Post04-22-2006 08:29 AM Click Here to See the Profile for 84fiero123Click Here to Email 84fiero123Send a Private Message to 84fiero123Direct Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Jake_Dragon:

http://www.realclassic.co.uk/books/books06020200.html
I found several books just google "how to build your own motorcycle"

You should learn to tig weld, it will give you greater control of the weld and if you get good enough you wont have to clean them up when youre done.

Seems to me there are several points that you would need to pay the most attention to.
Wheels - I would not get too aggressive the first time out and put the wheels close to stock. It all depends on what your after.
Front forks - If this is a bike your going to ride a lot you probably dont want a lot of rake
Fuel tank - unless you plan on spending a lot of time learning how to build your own you should pick it early it will effect how you build your frame
Are you going to make it rigid? or try and do a swing arm?
Motor - You will probably want to make a jig for the motor, make a plate with all of the mounting points on it and use it as a jig to make sure your motor will fit as you weld up the frame.

I dont know anything about building bikes, but I worked in the welding field for over 15 years and was pretty good at it. If I ever retire I will probably open or work in a shop part time, it all depends on where I am in 20 years.
Move to Florida and we can open our own shop, your rich right

Good luck hope you have fun and dont hurt yourself


I second everything Jake said with some added info.

Tig is definitely the way to go.

There is a motorcycle build show on one of the channels I canít remember what one right now but it will show you how much work it can really be.

Nothing is cut and dried, no matter how good you think you are like anything can and will go wrong.

I have also never built a bike but was hoping this summer to build my daughter a atv/gokart duel seat and duel controls.

Amanda has problems understanding the stop and go pedals and I thought this would make it easier to teach her how to drive.

------------------
technology is great when it works
and one big pain in the ass when it doesn't.
Detroit iron rules all the rest are just toys.

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ltlfrari
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Report this Post04-22-2006 01:40 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ltlfrariClick Here to visit ltlfrari's HomePageClick Here to Email ltlfrariSend a Private Message to ltlfrariDirect Link to This Post
Here you go, problem solved.


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NEPTUNE
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Report this Post04-22-2006 02:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for NEPTUNESend a Private Message to NEPTUNEDirect Link to This Post
A motorcycle frame appears to be very simple.
NOTHING could be further from the truth.
It has to be perfectly straight and square, for starters. If not, it will not track straight, and will be extremely dangerous.
The geometry is even more critical in a two wheeled vehicle than a four (or three) wheeled one.
Then there is the driveline. If you weld an engine/tranny slightly off track in a car, the universal joints in the driveshaft will compensate. A chain drive is not so forgiving.
These examples are only for starters.
Trust me, this is NOT something an amateur, even a talented one, should attempt.
There are, however, frames available for special purpose, racing, and custom bikes that are sometimes better ie: prettier, lighter, stretched. An internet search will turn up lots of possibilities

[This message has been edited by NEPTUNE (edited 04-22-2006).]

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Scott-Wa
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Report this Post04-22-2006 04:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Scott-WaClick Here to visit Scott-Wa's HomePageClick Here to Email Scott-WaSend a Private Message to Scott-WaDirect Link to This Post
The woodcycle is a sculpture made entirely out of wood, I think I saw it on display in an airport years ago, maybe a decade or more.

I believe it's called Gunshy by Michael Cooper, and has a revolver built into the design. Something like 48 different types of wood. Amazing in person.
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Boondawg
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Report this Post04-22-2006 04:22 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BoondawgClick Here to Email BoondawgSend a Private Message to BoondawgDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Scott-Wa:

The woodcycle is a sculpture made entirely out of wood, I think I saw it on display in an airport years ago, maybe a decade or more.

I believe it's called Gunshy by Michael Cooper, and has a revolver built into the design. Something like 48 different types of wood. Amazing in person.


Thanks for the info!


The public, especially those who love art and motorcycles, may drop by De Anza College in Cupertino to see an extraordinary 4,000-piece wooden sculpture in the lobby of the Learning Center during the week of March 22 and April 5. (The library is closed the week of April 29 during spring break.)

Art instructor Michael Cooper's almost-life-size wooden motorcycle has been described as a "fantasy chopper" but its official name is "Gunshy." Wherever the work is shown, it draws lots of attention for its overall beauty and intricate design. For instance, at the 48th Annual Oakland Roadster Show, "Gunshy" drew all kinds of admirers even though it was displayed among the real choppers.

This show-stopper, which even includes a sidecar, is made of 48 types of unstained wood so the natural color and grain of the wood are accentuated. Motorcycle enthusiasts have the opportunity to point out various motor parts. Careful observers will find a .38 caliber revolver integrated into the frame Ř Cooper's comment on the devastation of firepower, which explains the name of the piece.

Cooper created the sculpture in just over nine months. Since its completion in 1996, "Gunshy" has been featured in seven publications. For example, it was on the September/October 1998 cover of "Woodworker West," was featured in a February 1998 article entitled "Hardly Davidson" in "Woodwork," and was selected for the professional first prize in the December 1998 "American Woodworker." Cooper's sculpture also won first place at a recent woodwork show at the Ontario Convention Center.

Cooper's specialty is creating elaborate wooden sculptures because he particularly enjoys the look, the feel and the fragrance of wood. Early on, he learned a lot by watching what was going on in his grandfather's and uncle's cabinet shop in Lodi, Calif. Cooper has been a tenured member of the De Anza faculty for 30 years, holds a B.A. and M.A. from San Jose State University, and an M.F.A. from the University of California at Berkeley.

[This message has been edited by Boondawg (edited 04-22-2006).]

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fierofetish
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Report this Post04-22-2006 04:32 PM Click Here to See the Profile for fierofetishClick Here to Email fierofetishSend a Private Message to fierofetishDirect Link to This Post
I have built racing go-kart chassis, and used aircraft tubing. Ordinary mild steel is not strong enough, and flexes too much.Not so much power in a go-kart as a motorbike, so it was not so critical. I should imagine a motorbike would be extremely difficult to have any success with , as others have so wisely pointed out
Nick
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Boondawg
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Report this Post04-22-2006 04:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for BoondawgClick Here to Email BoondawgSend a Private Message to BoondawgDirect Link to This Post
I think you guys are right.

I think what i'm going to try to do, is design & weld-up some handlebars.
Just to see how difficult it is.
That should be a good little test, as I would imagine most of the techniques are the same.

Really just thinking, for now.......................

Thanks for the wise advice, guys!
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