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someone had a really bad day by Jaygee79
Started on: 11-28-2001 11:18 PM
Replies: 4
Last post by: Jaygee79 on 11-29-2001 12:18 PM
Jaygee79
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Report this Post11-28-2001 11:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Jaygee79Click Here to Email Jaygee79Send a Private Message to Jaygee79Direct Link to This Post
There was an accident this afternoon about 10 minutes from my house. A dump truck drove into a moving train. Don't really know how that happened but I'm guessing the driver is probably dead after that. And if not he's probably wishing he was. They had the whole road blocked off. One of the customers where I work said that the dump truck looked like an accordion.

Only thing I can figure is that the train didn't stop before going through the intersection. We don't have lights at the train tracks. The train stops before it gets to the intersection and a guy gets off and stops traffic and lets the train go. (pretty 1800's if you ask me). But maybe it was a new driver and didn't realize we don't have lights and went right through. Either that or the truck lost his brakes.

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fierospeeder
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Report this Post11-29-2001 12:41 AM Click Here to See the Profile for fierospeederClick Here to visit fierospeeder's HomePageClick Here to Email fierospeederSend a Private Message to fierospeederDirect Link to This Post
what kind of a train was this?


In this state, we have signals. Otherwise, if there isn't any lights/signals then there will just be a large X with R&R crossing.

People who drive are responsible for stopping or yielding at the crossings if they are nonsensored. So if they get injured or killed then they were at fault.

Ive seen on tv, where people got hit behind from another driver and got struck by a train.

We got dumbasses in this state that go around the crossing gates when they are down. When caught, you will get a $500 dollar fine for going around. Unless its more now.


in the post, jobs we wished we could have. A locomotive engineer is another one of mine.

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malacite
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Report this Post11-29-2001 11:11 AM Click Here to See the Profile for malaciteClick Here to Email malaciteSend a Private Message to malaciteDirect Link to This Post
i remember reading about a man that tried to go around the gates and struck another man head on. the other guy was triyning to go around the gates. they didn't get hit by the train though. however the first guy did win a darwin award.

dumb@$$

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WampusCat
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Report this Post11-29-2001 11:27 AM Click Here to See the Profile for WampusCatSend a Private Message to WampusCatDirect Link to This Post
That happened in Memphis a few months ago!! Two cars going around the crossing gates struck each other head on. The train narrowly missed them but some were killed in the car wreck.
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Jaygee79
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Report this Post11-29-2001 12:18 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Jaygee79Click Here to Email Jaygee79Send a Private Message to Jaygee79Direct Link to This Post
there was a big article in the paper about it today. The trains around here are constantly going through the intersections without stopping and letting someone stop traffic (which is their policy). It was a dump truck carrying about 75,000 pounds of gravel and there is a slight decline in the road just before the tracks. he couldn't stop in time. he jumped out of the truck just before it hit. if anyone wants to read the full article, here it is:

Truck, train collide in Dartmouth

By JOHN DOHERTY, Standard-Times staff writer
DARTMOUTH -- Leaping from the cab moments before his dump truck smashed into a rolling freight train, Nelson Furtado walked away with minor injuries from a railroad crossing long seen by town officials as a tragedy waiting to happen.
Mr. Furtado, 30, of New Bedford was driving north on Faunce Corner Road yesterday shortly before 3 p.m. when his 10-wheel dump truck collided with an east-bound freight train.

The collision tore a hole in the train's engine car, spilling much of the 1,500 gallons of diesel on board and tying up traffic on the busy thoroughfare off Interstate 195.
Mr. Furtado, his truck weighed down with 75,000 pounds of dirt and gravel, was unable to stop the truck as it approached the tracks on a slight downhill grade, said Dartmouth police spokesman Kenneth Cotta.
Mr. Furtado was transported to St. Luke's Hospital, where he was treated for cuts and bruises and released.
The crossing on Faunce Corner Road has neither the lowering gates common at many railroad intersections, nor the flashing lights that warn drivers of oncoming trains' approach.
Only painted "RR Crossing" signs on the road surface of both lanes indicate the crossing.
Residents have complained for years that the CSX company's trains that use the tracks to deliver freight through Southeastern Massachusetts do not always observe the "stop and protect" policy in place at the crossing.
Trains are supposed to stop, and a conductor or other personnel is to walk into the road, stop traffic and then bring the train across Faunce Corner Road.
CSX officials could not be reached last night.
Yesterday, Joseph Luiz, Mr. Furtado's employer, said confusion caused the accident yesterday.
He spoke with Mr. Furtado at St. Luke's emergency room.
As he approached the tracks, Mr. Furtado noticed the train stopped shortly before the intersection, Mr. Luiz said.
But vehicle traffic continued across the tracks, and no one was in the road stopping traffic, Mr. Luiz said.
Mr. Furtado continued across the intersection, but the train, too, began to roll through.
According to Mr. Luiz, the 30-year-old truck driver sounded his horn, but the train continued.
Mr. Furtado hit the brakes, but he was unable to stop, he said.
"I don't know if he had brakes or what," said Mr. Luiz. "But a truck carrying a load like that doesn't stop on a dime."
Mr. Furtado leapt from the cab, and his truck continued on, striking the engine car and then uncoupling the freight cars behind.
State police, Dartmouth police and fire, and the state hazardous-materials truck responded to the accident and the fuel spill.
In 1999, town officials called for lights and perhaps gates to be installed at the crossing.
Once a seldom-traveled road, the north section of Faunce Corner Road now hosts several medical offices, the Vanity Fair clothing store, the Southern New England School of Law and the Bristol County Sheriff's Department.
Traffic, especially in the late afternoon, is as heavy on this stretch of road as it is further down Faunce Corner by the malls and restaurants.
For Mr. Luiz, this was the second time a friend was struck by a train here.
In 1970, his friend Daniel Ferguson, then a star high-school athlete, was struck by a train on Faunce Corner Road at night while driving a pick-up.
He, too, escaped relatively unscathed.
"They spend millions developing this road and don't put any lights up," said Mr. Luiz. "I think it's time.

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