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E3 spark Plugs by DandRauto
Started on: 06-05-2008 11:19 AM
Replies: 6
Last post by: Marvin McInnis on 06-06-2008 11:32 AM
DandRauto
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Report this Post06-05-2008 11:19 AM Click Here to See the Profile for DandRautoSend a Private Message to DandRautoDirect Link to This Post
I see all the comercials on the Power Block channel and in magazines. Is the info about these plugs real or just hype?

Has anybody used these plugs? What was the results?
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emsdad
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Report this Post06-05-2008 11:46 AM Click Here to See the Profile for emsdadSend a Private Message to emsdadDirect Link to This Post
I use them in my Lawn equipment and they work well. I know first hand how finnicky the fiero is when it comes to plugs. I put a set of platinuim plugs in it and it ran like a corn planter. I went to the old cheapy ac plugs and it straightend right up.
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uhlanstan
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Report this Post06-05-2008 12:00 PM Click Here to See the Profile for uhlanstanClick Here to Email uhlanstanSend a Private Message to uhlanstanDirect Link to This Post
The special plugs normally provide a benefit at high RPM,, they are of no use in a FIERO unless you race ,,Dyno test on modified engines is very positives ,, you are wasting your money using these spark plugs in any normal use car .
The horse power gain would be difficult to FEEL in the car..
The small electrode spark plugs might provide some small benefit ,,but not worth the extra price
The best overall performance would be with the A C DELCO rapid fires (possible,maybe)
invest in top quality plug wires, they provide longer service and stronger spark they add no H P but the car often runs better and thier can be a mpg gain
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rjblaze
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Report this Post06-05-2008 01:11 PM Click Here to See the Profile for rjblazeClick Here to Email rjblazeSend a Private Message to rjblazeDirect Link to This Post
I recently added a set to my '99 S-10 4wd pickup and realized a 1.87 mpg increase and a much smoother idle (very noticable). And no, the plugs I replaced were only 2 weeks old before I "tried" the E3's.
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timgray
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Report this Post06-05-2008 09:20 PM Click Here to See the Profile for timgrayClick Here to visit timgray's HomePageClick Here to Email timgraySend a Private Message to timgrayDirect Link to This Post
Zero effect other than they EAT coils on multi coil ignition systems. Had a friend lose a coilpack on his car because the plugs simply have an extra gap inside to make the spark gap wider which makes higher voltage which stresses the coil hard.

The plugs are nothing special and have been around in one form or another cince the 50's. dont waste your money,
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AP2k
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Report this Post06-05-2008 10:48 PM Click Here to See the Profile for AP2kClick Here to Email AP2kSend a Private Message to AP2kDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by timgray:which stresses the coil hard.


Anyone curious as to how this is performed, a wider gap makes the power output increase. More power output means the coil pack gets hotter and faster. It reaches a hurdle point where the coil has been heated beyond what it was made for and it simply dies.

A solution would to obviously get a more powerful coil pack that would ordinarilly be rated for higher temperatures and power.
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Marvin McInnis
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Report this Post06-06-2008 11:32 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Marvin McInnisClick Here to visit Marvin McInnis's HomePageSend a Private Message to Marvin McInnisDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by AP2k:

Anyone curious as to how this is performed, a wider gap makes the power output increase. More power output means the coil pack gets hotter and faster. It reaches a hurdle point where the coil has been heated beyond what it was made for and it simply dies.



I don't think you understand what's going on here. (And I don't understand what you mean by, "... the coil pack gets ... faster.") You certainly went right past timgray's critical point:

 
quote
Originally posted by timgray:

... the plugs simply have an extra gap inside to make the spark gap wider which makes higher voltage which stresses the coil hard. [Emphasis added -- AMM]



You (AP2k) are probably correct when you say, "a wider gap makes the power output increase," because we expect the peak voltage to increase. But that generally doesn't matter, because a wider gap does not increase the total spark energy delivered by the coil. (Power != Energy ... Power = Energy / Time)

timgray is correct that higher voltage, resulting in high-voltage breakdown of the insulation inside the coil, is the primary culprit in coil failures when the spark gap is too wide.

[This message has been edited by Marvin McInnis (edited 06-06-2008).]

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