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Why would a rebuilt rear caliper fail so soon? by Cliff Pennock
Started on: 10-22-2007 11:27 AM
Replies: 12
Last post by: Phil on 04-28-2008 02:52 PM
Cliff Pennock
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Report this Post10-22-2007 11:27 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff PennockClick Here to visit Cliff Pennock's HomePageClick Here to Email Cliff PennockSend a Private Message to Cliff PennockDirect Link to This Post
I bought a rebuilt rear caliper (passenger's side) in November 2006 and I have driven my Fiero for maybe 1,500 miles since and now it has failed already. It's leaking brake oil massively from behind the locker nut. Is this just a bad caliper or am I using the wrong brake fluid (I'm using DOT 4)?

My problem is also that I don't have a garage so I can't do any work myself (that can't be done in a very short time in a public parking garage). How easy is it to rebuild the caliper myself? Or should I just get another rebuilt caliper (perhpas this one is still under warranty)?
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frankt2012
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Report this Post10-22-2007 11:38 AM Click Here to See the Profile for frankt2012Click Here to Email frankt2012Send a Private Message to frankt2012Direct Link to This Post
I've had that happen. For some reason the rebuilds seem to not be so good on these things. I had all 4 rebuilds go in less then a year. I to am using Dot 4, but I don't think that would be a problem. I had a brand new Seville rear caliper bad out of the box last week when doing the brake conversion go bad in 2 days. The people rebuilding them aren't paying attention to what there doing I think. As far as rebuilding them I think its pretty easy but I never did a Fiero rear caliper. I did do a front on an old Triumph TR6 and it wasen't to hard.

-Frank

[This message has been edited by frankt2012 (edited 10-22-2007).]

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rockcrawl
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Report this Post10-22-2007 12:17 PM Click Here to See the Profile for rockcrawlClick Here to visit rockcrawl's HomePageClick Here to Email rockcrawlSend a Private Message to rockcrawlDirect Link to This Post
The problem is that the rebuilders are using bad cores that should not be rebuilt. I've had two Fieros through my shop recently with rebuilt calipers (both from Calipersonline) that leaked. The first one was leaking at the piston right after it was installed, it looked like it was cracked. We got a replacement and it also leaked, but at the parking brake lever. I disassembled it to find that the aluminum body of the caliper was severely pitted where the shaft for the parking brake mechanism comes through. The second car was also leaking at the parking brake lever after just a few miles. Calipersonline has been good about sending replacements.

Jon
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craigsfiero2007
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Report this Post10-22-2007 01:33 PM Click Here to See the Profile for craigsfiero2007Click Here to Email craigsfiero2007Send a Private Message to craigsfiero2007Direct Link to This Post
I think you bought a junk caliper, sometimes the rebuilders don't pay attention and they rebuild a junk caliper, it could be pitted real bad in the inside or it could be cracked, it doesn't take much damage to a caliper to make it leak brake fluid. Running DOT 4 brake is not a problem, I don't know why you need to run DOT 4 brake fluid but hey it's your car. DOT 4 brake fluid is really supposed to be used for race cars and anything else that gets the brakes red hot, but it doesn't hurt to run it, just costs more. If I were you I would take it back to the parts store and get a another one and look it over before you walk out.
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Alex4mula
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Report this Post10-22-2007 02:09 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Alex4mulaClick Here to Email Alex4mulaSend a Private Message to Alex4mulaDirect Link to This Post
Rebuild is very easy. You can easlily take the caliper out of the car (try looking like changing a tire) in the parking lot and take it to apt. to work on it. Then put it back. But what may take a little longer with the wheel off is the bleeding time. Still shouldn't be that much. Just make sure you fill the caliper with fluid (still in your apt.!) before connecting line.
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Cliff Pennock
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Report this Post10-26-2007 08:34 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff PennockClick Here to visit Cliff Pennock's HomePageClick Here to Email Cliff PennockSend a Private Message to Cliff PennockDirect Link to This Post
I got a replacement caliper from the FieroStore (talk about fast shipping) and I can either bring the car to the garage and have them replace it for $50, or try to do it myself in a public garage. If I bring it to the garage, it'll probably be at least a week or two before they have the time. Second, the last time I had them replace the caliper the E-brake didn't work when I got the car back simply because they have no clue how to adjust the E-Brake on the caliper side. If I do it myself, well, let's just say I can take a computer apart and put it back together blindfolded and overclock the hell out of it in the process - but I'm no wrench monkey. So I would need step by step instructions.
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Joseph Upson
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Report this Post10-26-2007 08:49 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Joseph UpsonClick Here to Email Joseph UpsonSend a Private Message to Joseph UpsonDirect Link to This Post
I just installed new emergency brake cables yesterday, the main cable is a bear to change, I have cuts to prove it. On the calipers since they are aluminum and very old probably the best replacement is a working original used or a brand new caliper if they still exist. The problem may not be so much poor attention as it is no attention at all, just a mechanical process to produce a part for resale; if it works great, if it doesn't try another, I doubt much effort goes into inspecting the cores. I've seen this problem with mastercylinders quite a bit, and lets not even mention the clutch hydraulic parts where even the new aftermarket parts come out of the box worthless before they're even tried on the car.
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Dodgerunner
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Report this Post10-26-2007 09:09 AM Click Here to See the Profile for DodgerunnerClick Here to visit Dodgerunner's HomePageClick Here to Email DodgerunnerSend a Private Message to DodgerunnerDirect Link to This Post
Wow Cliff! I never knew what your lineage was. I always assumed that you ran some garage or something (to be involved with Fieros) and where just good at computer related things. Did not know it was the other way around.

Itís not to hard and probably takes more muscle than brains.

You looking for something like this? Others can add their advice/tips.

I donít know what year so thinking itís not an 88 so will write that way and that your E brake is adjusted correctly.

1. First clean the grit off the brake adjuster under the left rear edge of the cradle. Using a wrench and a vise grip or pliers loosen the brake adjuster about ten turns. If you keep track of how many turns you give it you can then put it back and should be in good shape.

2. Remove the tire from the side you want to replace.

3. Cover the floor under the wheel area so you donít get brake fluid on the floor and make the garage mad.

4. Work the brake cable and spring off the e-brake level of the caliper. (I usually just do this with my hands wearing gloves.)

5. Squeeze the cable shield clips on the brake cable and remove it from the hole in the caliper bracket. This sometimes thatís a little patents. I use a needle nose most of the time and work it at an angle.

6. Get the correct size torque bit that fits the caliper pins. ( I donít remember what the size is but sure someone will post it.) Since the caliper was replaced not to long ago and you donít drive it that much should not be rusted in and fairly easy to remove. Loosen the two pins but donít remove them yet.

7. Now with a socket or wrench break the brake line bolt loose that holds the brake line to the caliper. If you work quickly you can pull the bolt, cover the end of the hose and stick it up into the strut spring so the fluid stops running out.

8. You now free to remove the two caliper bolts and pull the caliper straight out, up and forward and toward the car door. Work it a little and you will see how it slides out.

9. Switch the pads from the old caliper to the new. (unless you are replacing them.) Note the metal ring or spring looking thing behind the inside pad so you can put in back in the relative same position on the new caliper. Itís there to pull the pad away from the rotor and keep it from rattling.

10. If the new caliper is compressed all the way (which it should on a new one) you should be able to slide the new caliper and pads back over the rotor. If not then post back for help on that (if needed).

11. When installng the brake line to the new caliper there should be two copper washers, one on each side of the hose end that the bolt goes thru. Make sure these are both there as they often like to stick on the caliper. does not hurt to get new ones also.

12. Reverse all above and you will be ready to bleed the air out of the caliper when a helper. Be sure to put a block of wood under the brake peddle so you don't press it all the way to the floor and hurt your master. Do you know how to bleed the air?

[This message has been edited by Dodgerunner (edited 10-26-2007).]

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Cliff Pennock
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Report this Post11-09-2007 11:02 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff PennockClick Here to visit Cliff Pennock's HomePageClick Here to Email Cliff PennockSend a Private Message to Cliff PennockDirect Link to This Post
I had brought my car to the local garage to have the rear passenger side caliper replaced. I don't have the time nor space to (try to) do it myself. They just called and said the caliper is on the car, but the sliders are stuck and no matter what he tries he can't get them unstuck. This is a new rebuild caliper (the second one). Is there a trick to get these things unstuck or is this the second bad caliper I got?
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Synthesis
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Report this Post11-09-2007 01:52 PM Click Here to See the Profile for SynthesisSend a Private Message to SynthesisDirect Link to This Post
The new caliper that was just installed has stuck sliders? That does not sound right. Did the sliders come preinstalled in the caliper?

Whenever I do Fiero brakes, I always replace the hardware with a hardware kit. It comes with new bolts and sliders. I relube the outside of the slider, and slap it all back together. Problem solved.
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Cliff Pennock
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Report this Post11-09-2007 02:19 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Cliff PennockClick Here to visit Cliff Pennock's HomePageClick Here to Email Cliff PennockSend a Private Message to Cliff PennockDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Synthesis:

The new caliper that was just installed has stuck sliders? That does not sound right. Did the sliders come preinstalled in the caliper?


Yes, they were preinstalled and they are stuck. Any tricks to "unstuck" them? Or is that a lost cause and do I need yet another caliper?

(As for it being a new caliper, it's actually a rebuild caliper.)
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Synthesis
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Report this Post11-09-2007 02:35 PM Click Here to See the Profile for SynthesisSend a Private Message to SynthesisDirect Link to This Post
The sliders need to be pressed out if they are stuck. They don't actually seize up on anything other than the rubber O-rings inside the slider bore in the caliper.

The bore in the caliper has 2 rubber O-Rings. The rubber O-rings seal the ends of the slider sleeve, and have to be lubed quite well with caliper slide grease.

The grease will keep all of the gunk and garbage out of the bore, and lube the O-rings.

If the caliper is rebuilt, and came with the sleeves, and they were stuck from the rebuild, then the place that rebuilt the caliper needs to be shot.

See if the shop can press the sleeves out of the caliper, and then make sure there is no corrosion on the sleeves. Regrease the slides, the inside of the sleeve bore, the O-rings, and slide it all back together.

I have freed up caliper slides using a bench vise on original 20+ year old OEM Calipers. Then I replaced the sliders.

[This message has been edited by Synthesis (edited 11-09-2007).]

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Phil
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Report this Post04-28-2008 02:52 PM Click Here to See the Profile for PhilClick Here to Email PhilSend a Private Message to PhilDirect Link to This Post
Did you ever get your calipers straightened out (pun intended)?
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