Pennock's Fiero Forum
  Technical Discussion & Questions - Archive
  How to remove a broken stud or bolt that is seized in from rust or corrosion

T H I S   I S   A N   A R C H I V E D   T O P I C
  

Email This Page to Someone! | Printable Version


How to remove a broken stud or bolt that is seized in from rust or corrosion by buddycraigg
Started on: 02-13-2003 01:04 AM
Replies: 10
Last post by: Butter on 02-14-2003 11:42 AM
buddycraigg
Member
Posts: 13353
From: kansas city, mo
Registered: Jul 2002


Feedback score: (5)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 475
Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 01:04 AM Click Here to See the Profile for buddycraiggClick Here to Email buddycraiggSend a Private Message to buddycraiggDirect Link to This Post
How to remove a broken stud or bolt that is seized in from rust or corrosion.

This will require a hot torch. You will need a *something* and oxygen torch. A simple propane torch will not get hot enough in most case.

I worked here… http://www.engine-parts.com/ for a year and a half, (please don’t hold that against me) and I learned 2 things that I will carry for the rest of my life.

ONE, do not put positive valve stem seals on the exhaust valves on a buick head. (my one and only comeback).

TWO, how to remove broken studs, especially exhaust studs since I was in the head department.

If you still have a stud or part of the bolt sticking out…
1. Go to http://www.snapon.com/ and do a word search for ALLIGATOR and buy them. they cost about 32.00. they will bite in to anything, I have twisted off 3/8 studs with these things. Mine are about 9 years old and still working. Say that about your channel lock pliers.
2. figure out a good angle of how you are going to get on the portion of the stud or bolt that is remaining with your new pliers AND USING THEM IN THE CORRECT DIRECTION.
3. go to the grocery store and buy some paraffin wax used for jarring/canning.
4. heat the stud and some of the surrounding area with your HOT torch, but don’t get it so hot that it glows.
5. press the block of paraffin against it so the wax can melt and wick in to the threads. It seems to work the best when it is just barely cooler than where the wax catches on fire.
6. grasp the stud with your pliers (see step 2) and remove stud.

If there is not any part of the stud still sticking out…
1. centerpuch (if possible).

2A. if the stud is in an open hole ( it can be driven out the back side like on the upper exhaust studs of a 2.8) use a small drill bit to drill a centering hole.
2A1. find a sharp drill bit slightly smaller than the thread size of what you are working with.
2A2. follow steps 3, 4 and 5 from above.
2A3. use the larger drill bit to bite in to the stud and drive it clockwise out of the shoulder.

2B. if the stud is in a blind hole. ( it cannot be driven out the back side of the hole) use a small drill bit to drill a centering hole
2B1. find the “easy out” that corresponds with your stud size and then go down one size from what they suggest.
2B2. drill the proper sized hole for your easyout.
2B3 follow steps 3,4 and 5 from above with the exception that you heat the surrounding area a little bit more.
2B4. drive the easy out in the hole with a firm tap with a small hammer of large ratchet ( if you use too large of a hammer you will cause problems for yourself. Smaller is better)
2B5. Grasp on to the easyout and turn it counterclockwise.


(** I have also had good success with left handed drill bits for 8mm or larger studs)


If this doesn’t work then you would have had to drill and tap no matter what.


------------------
84 SE 2m8
85 GT (dead)

[This message has been edited by buddycraigg (edited 02-13-2003).]

IP: Logged
PFF
System Bot
Pyrthian
Member
Posts: 29541
From: Detroit, MI
Registered: Jul 2002


Feedback score: (5)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 341
Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 11:37 AM Click Here to See the Profile for PyrthianClick Here to Email PyrthianSend a Private Message to PyrthianDirect Link to This Post
wax huh? cool, never would have thought of that!
for stuck studs i've used a small (10") pipe wrench - gets great bite
also, another trick for studs is threading on a nut, then welding it on, and wrench it again
now, how about a good trick for getting my rubber brake lines off so I can put the braided lines I bought on? I really dont want to bend new metal lines, or buy the Fiero Store pre-bent set. actually, I DO want to buy the pre-bent set, but dont have the cash....I havent rounded them yet, but have come close. I probably will just grab them with vise grips and make a mess of the metal lines, but I'd like to do a nice job of it....
IP: Logged
LS1swap
Member
Posts: 1181
From: McHenry,IL.USA
Registered: Jan 2001


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 12:45 PM Click Here to See the Profile for LS1swapClick Here to visit LS1swap's HomePageClick Here to Email LS1swapSend a Private Message to LS1swapDirect Link to This Post
I have heard of that before... Only I was told to use a candle. Same principal I am sure. Pb blaster works pretty good too. I just took four manifold studs out of a 95 f-150 the other day with that stuff. It is best if you can let it soak a few days. Also instead of vice grips I use a stud remover. It works with a 1/2" drive breaker bar. The harder you turn the tighter it grab. Much like a pipe wrench

------------------
LS1 v8 T-Top 87 GT

http://ls1swap.tripod.com/

IP: Logged
Joe Torma
Member
Posts: 3485
From: Hillsborough, NJ USA
Registered: Jul 2001


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 129
Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 06:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Joe TormaClick Here to visit Joe Torma's HomePageClick Here to Email Joe TormaSend a Private Message to Joe TormaDirect Link to This Post
...and what if you've gotten an easy-out that snapped and stuck in a bolt that broke? Grrr....and its a sway bar bolt in the frame.
IP: Logged
David Bartlett
Member
Posts: 1087
From: Ancaster, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Aug 2001


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 07:23 PM Click Here to See the Profile for David BartlettClick Here to Email David BartlettSend a Private Message to David BartlettDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Joe Torma:

...and what if you've gotten an easy-out that snapped and stuck in a bolt that broke? Grrr....and its a sway bar bolt in the frame.


I hate easy-outs, I've snapped everyone I've ever owned. Sometimes I find it easier to drill the bolt out and chip the remaining threads out of the hole.

IP: Logged
mvstar
Member
Posts: 209
From: Ortona Fl. USA
Registered: May 2002


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback

Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 09:02 PM Click Here to See the Profile for mvstarClick Here to Email mvstarSend a Private Message to mvstarDirect Link to This Post
#410 channelock pliers will grip better than any visegrips i have ever seen.You can put a 3/8 bolt in a vice holding it by the head and grab the bolt with the 410s and twist it off just like a pipe wrench,once you get a little pressure on them you dont even have to squeeze the handles it will GRIP.They are not easy to find,pretty well known in the marine industry in this part of Florida.Salt water boat techs have to be good at removing rusted bolts.The local Mac tool man used to be able to order them and i think most hardware stores can too.Try em youll love em
IP: Logged
avengador1
Member
Posts: 35467
From: Orlando, Florida
Registered: Oct 2001


Feedback score:    (7)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 572
Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 09:24 PM Click Here to See the Profile for avengador1Click Here to Email avengador1Send a Private Message to avengador1Direct Link to This Post
Sears has a variety of extractors available. The have sockets for stripped/rounded bolt heads, Drill-out/screw out for reverse running drills, micro drill out for small screws, and easy outs for bolts and studs. Like Tim Taylor used to say "every f'ing tool you could need".
IP: Logged
css9450
Member
Posts: 5023
From: Glen Ellyn, Illinois, USA
Registered: Nov 2002


Feedback score: (2)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 82
Rate this member

Report this Post02-13-2003 09:40 PM Click Here to See the Profile for css9450Click Here to Email css9450Send a Private Message to css9450Direct Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by buddycraigg:

3. go to the grocery store and buy some paraffin wax used for jarring/canning.
4. heat the stud and some of the surrounding area with your HOT torch, but don’t get it so hot that it glows.
5. press the block of paraffin against it so the wax can melt and wick in to the threads.


What does the wax do? Soak down into the threaded connection and help lubricate it? (At least it doesn't have that vile smell like the PB Blaster does) I can't wait to try it --- On second thought, I hope I never have to try it

IP: Logged
Darth Fiero
Member
Posts: 5888
From: Waterloo, Indiana
Registered: Oct 2002


Feedback score: (5)
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 360
Rate this member

Report this Post02-14-2003 01:02 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Darth FieroClick Here to visit Darth Fiero's HomePageClick Here to Email Darth FieroSend a Private Message to Darth FieroDirect Link to This Post
We learned this trick at school years ago. The wax, as it melts, wicks up the threads, chasing the heat. Think of how a candle works and why the wick doesn't just burn away.

I have also found many other uses for the wax trick. First of all, you don't need an oxy/gas torch all of the time, just on those really hard to get out fasteners. BTW, it is not always good to use that hot of stuff to try to get siezed fasteners unstuck, it can make the metal you are working with (and want to keep) very brittle or distort it.

Anyway, a propane torch and the wax works wonders with getting those pesky rusted brake lines unfrozen. The key to remember here is not to get it too hot, just enough for the wax to melt into the threads and fitting. Don't try to remove it all the way the first time because most of the time the line is rusted to the fitting. Just work it a little at a time applying heat and wax as neccessary. Oh yea, be careful because some of this stuff you are working with might be flammible.

------------------
Fiero-related Conversions Performed:

1985 SE 3800 Series 1 SC 4T60-E
1987 Coupe 3800 Series II 4T60-E
1987 SE 3.4 TDC 5-speed
1984 Coupe SBC V8 non-OD to 4T60 OD swap

http://dtcc.cz28.com

[This message has been edited by Darth Fiero (edited 02-14-2003).]

IP: Logged
Butter
Member
Posts: 3979
From: TN
Registered: Apr 2001


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 91
Rate this member

Report this Post02-14-2003 11:39 AM Click Here to See the Profile for ButterClick Here to Email ButterSend a Private Message to ButterDirect Link to This Post
 
quote
Originally posted by Joe Torma:

...and what if you've gotten an easy-out that snapped and stuck in a bolt that broke? Grrr....and its a sway bar bolt in the frame.


Go back to the old school!

Try this---
Take a washer just the exact size of the broken bolt to be removed. Hold that washer in place by a piece of steel that you weld to the broken bolt. The washer is used to keep from welding to the surrounding metal. Let the weld cool till strong. Unscrew the broken bolt with that piece of metal you just connected to it.


IP: Logged
Butter
Member
Posts: 3979
From: TN
Registered: Apr 2001


Feedback score: N/A
Leave feedback





Total ratings: 91
Rate this member

Report this Post02-14-2003 11:42 AM Click Here to See the Profile for ButterClick Here to Email ButterSend a Private Message to ButterDirect Link to This Post

Butter

3979 posts
Member since Apr 2001
Great info Buddycraigg! Thanks.
IP: Logged
PFF
System Bot



All times are ET (US)

T H I S   I S   A N   A R C H I V E D   T O P I C
  

Contact Us | Back To Main Page

Advertizing on PFF | Fiero Parts Vendors
PFF Merchandise | Fiero Gallery | Ogre's Cave
Real-Time Chat | Fiero Related Auctions on eBay



Copyright (c) 1999, C. Pennock