1988 Formula Build for Jeri
Topic started by: Toddster, Date: 08-30-2019 08:08 PM
Original thread: http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum1/HTML/098963.html


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #1, 08-30-2019 08:08 PM
      For years Jeri has wanted a very specific car, White, Formula, T-Tops, 5-speed.........................sigh, sure babe, I'll just run out and buy one for you.



10 YEARS LATER.....I give you my Arizona Craig's list find for just $700:

The car has been sitting for the past 15 years or so but it is 100% rust free, dash is uncracked (believe it or not), original literature is with it, it is an auto and Non-CJB, but I just parted a 1987 GT with 5-Speed so I got this

As you know, I name every build so in the spirit of my southern belle, I give you project WHITE LIGHTNING!

Stay tuned

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

IMSA GT (drumwzrd@comcast.net) MSG #2, 08-30-2019 10:47 PM
      Glad to have you back.

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #3, 08-30-2019 11:02 PM
      Thank you brother. All the kids are grown to the point where they wants cars so what better way to get them started than working on a car with them. We just finished fixing up an 86 GT for Evan who is going into the Marines at the end of the year.

Spadesluck MSG #4, 08-31-2019 12:20 AM
      Awesome find! Can't beat that price.

Tony Kania MSG #5, 08-31-2019 10:26 AM
      I appreciate your presence also.

Whatever happened to that hot rod you were building from scratch? I have pics on another hard drive. Just thought it was really cool and hoped you went farther with it.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #6, 09-01-2019 10:18 PM
      Thanks Tony, Life changes kept me away for a while but I am back to stay.

OK, the first thing to do when you get a car that has been sitting for a long time is RESEARCH!

1) Start with a visual inspection at the storage location:

I noticed no oil leaks under that car, no break fluid leaks, and no coolant leaks. The Schrader valve for the AC was pressurized, and the car rolled with the break off and the transmission in Neutral with no labor. The car was stored under a car port so it did have some sun damage on the passenger side. And I noticed the property was next to a dry creek bed so I check for evidence of flash flood damage, none was found.

2) Examine the paperwork:



In this case I bought a 1 owner car and have plenty of paperwork. At 34K he had a code 42 and 32 so an EGR and pick-up coil were replaced, tires at 67K and regular oil changes right up to 92K miles (there are 113K on it now). That is where the paperwork ends. The original title from Arizona shows the car was purchased March 1988 and the owner paid $8,999. It comes with original keys (including T-Top locks).

The paperwork was kept in a manila folder and the car has no damage. Clearly this was loved car at some point in time. This gives me hope for the next step;

3) Do a detailed inspection of the car:

The front compartment looks like a time capsule. Nothing has moved since 1988. Even spare tire still has the little thin ridge of rubber around the center line indicating that it has never been used. The tire iron look factory fresh with no paint chipping or scratches and the AC still has R-12 in it. Aside from a layer of dust to remove, I will not have much to do up here. the head light motors are probably due for a rebuild so I will get to that first, it's a simple job and takes an hour.



Spare tire:


The rear trunk is clean and the original T-Top bags are neat and folded.


The engine has good and bad news: the good is that the dog bone is in perfect condition. THAT means that it has been driven responsibly and not raced. It probably means that I will find the internals are clean. As long as I can turn the engine by hand, it will need just basic service.


the BAD news is that critters got under the hood and lunched on the wiring. It's a good thing I am swapping in a Getrag 5-speed (harness is part of the swap. I will go into a lot of detail for the benefit of all)



The T-Tops are cooked, but fortunately, the main seals are only cracked on the outside passenger side edge. The rest of the parts are available easily so I will give them a good clean and respray.



The last look is at the interior. Aside from some driver side bolster damage, the interior is in great shape. I do have some reshaping of the squishy bits to do but the dash is uncracked (I'll use caster oil to keep it that way, old navy trick) and the most interesting part is that there are NO OPTIONS......NONE! This was one light weight bad ass car in it's day. But I am building for Jeri so we will add all the bells and whistles. I have a 1987 GT parts car with everything I need: power windows, door, locks, mirrors, subwoofer, trunk release, and cruise.



Stay Tuned!

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #7, 09-06-2019 08:29 PM
      Nothing like a new pair of shoes to lift your spirits. uh...wear your sunglasses.


[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

fierogt28 MSG #8, 09-06-2019 09:07 PM
      Todd, those look beautiful !!

Did you get them refinished?

Thanks,



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #9, 09-06-2019 11:10 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierogt28:

Todd, those look beautiful !!

Did you get them refinished?

Thanks,




Yes, re-rounded, minor road rash cleaned-up, mirror finish, and new paint on the honeycomb. I'll get some new tires mounted and balanced later. Sunday, the real work begins.


blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #10, 09-07-2019 05:24 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:

For years Jeri has wanted a very specific car, White, Formula, T-Tops, 5-speed.........................sigh, sure babe, I'll just run out and buy one for you.

10 YEARS LATER.....I give you my Arizona Craig's list find for just $700:

The car has been sitting for the past 15 years or so but it is 100% rust free, dash is uncracked (believe it or not), original literature is with it, it is an auto and Non-CJB, but I just parted a 1987 GT with 5-Speed so I got this

As you know, I name every build so in the spirit of my southern belle, I give you project WHITE LIGHTNING!

Stay tuned



Had I known, Jerri could have been happy long ago. Mine could be your car's twin.
My 88 CJB Formula, 5 speed with most of the bells and whistles sits the vast majority of the time. Have thought about her going several times. I just don't have the time and resources to retain, use and play with the whole fleet. My sideline activities (transporting other people's junk) takes up way more time than it's worth.

Rams


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #11, 09-07-2019 11:16 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by blackrams:


Had I known, Jerri could have been happy long ago. Mine could be your car's twin.
My 88 CJB Formula, 5 speed with most of the bells and whistles sits the vast majority of the time. Have thought about her going several times. I just don't have the time and resources to retain, use and play with the whole fleet. My sideline activities (transporting other people's junk) takes up way more time than it's worth.

Rams


Sounds like you are thinking of a career change Rams.

Yes, I could have posted an ad about looking for the car she wanted but then it would cost a lot and not be as much fun to build. I'm all about bringing the dead back to life.



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #12, 09-15-2019 08:13 PM
      Bargain tip of the day:

OHTSU FP7000 Tires 480 Wear, A traction, A temperature, 60,000 miles, H rated (130mph), $247 plus another $60 for new valve stems, mounting and balancing with unlimited rotation and rebalancing for a total of $307 total at Walmart. I ordered them online and they delivered them to my local Walmart within a week with no delivery charge.

BTW, see how they compare in size with my Chevy Silverado tires below.



Also, I took out the engine and transmission from my 1987 GT parts car and cleaned it up before pulling the 5-speed for the swap. TIP: if you think you don't need a pressure washer, you need a pressure washer.

BEFORE:


AFTER:


A cleaning reveals a lot of sins. The reason this car was sold for scrap is an old favorite:


Got me some welding to do.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-29-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #13, 09-15-2019 09:17 PM
      Since the Formula is bare bones and automatic, I need a donor car for parts to be able to transform it into a 5-Speed, add Power windows, mirrors, door locks with keyless entry, cruise, subwoofer and a performance sound system with bluetooth and other bells and whistles.

Meet the donor. I bought these 2 GTs for $500 each, 1987 and 1988. (I will restore the 1988 GT after the Formula) The '87 GT make a perfect donor for the Formula, the '88 GT and for our son's '86 GT. It is rust free and loaded!

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-29-2019).]

2.5 MSG #14, 09-16-2019 08:51 AM
     

blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #15, 09-16-2019 09:21 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


Sounds like you are thinking of a career change Rams.

Yes, I could have posted an ad about looking for the car she wanted but then it would cost a lot and not be as much fun to build. I'm all about bringing the dead back to life.



Yeah, I retired. But still get requests for transporting something somewhere. I'm getting pretty selective about where I go and what I haul. Thinking about selling my trailers, already sold one of my trucks.
You might be surprised at how little cash it would take to drive my 88 Formula, CJB, 5 speed car home. I realize you will enjoy the build but, I'm thinking I've got one, maybe two too many Fieros. The 88 Formula, 3800SC, five speed car still holds my attention but, eventually, it will go to.

Rams


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #16, 09-16-2019 10:16 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by blackrams:


Yeah, I retired. But still get requests for transporting something somewhere. I'm getting pretty selective about where I go and what I haul. Thinking about selling my trailers, already sold one of my trucks.
You might be surprised at how little cash it would take to drive my 88 Formula, CJB, 5 speed car home. I realize you will enjoy the build but, I'm thinking I've got one, maybe two too many Fieros. The 88 Formula, 3800SC, five speed car still holds my attention but, eventually, it will go to.

Rams


Let's see a picture of the Formula!


olejoedad (welch.joe.714@gmail.com) MSG #17, 09-16-2019 11:35 AM
      OHTSU is made by Falkan and their tires use some of the old Falkan sidewall and tread patterns.

They are good tires, I've had a set on the front of my Formula for a few years.

[This message has been edited by olejoedad (edited 09-16-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #18, 09-19-2019 10:54 PM
      I was wondering how bird poop got all over the seats and dash with the windows rolled-up. What a way to go.



The next phase of the job is to totally remove the entire interior. For those of you who Jones after Rust free western cars, there IS a down side.



What is the wide wide world of Trailer park fixes am I looking at?



I LOVE unbroken trim pieces. the trim on this car is dirtly as all get out, but undamaged!



Steering column is out and now for the Automatic tranny brake assembly. The only thing holding it in place is a single 13mm nut on the top of the frame. Once you get the nuts off the Brake Booster, just pull it out. You may need to move soe wiring around a bit.:



To convert to a 5-Speed you need to remove the 4 nuts holding the brake booster to the brake assembly. And you need to remove the blanking plate over the clutch hole. Just use a screw driver to pry the center metal tab up and she pops right out.



Since I am going to add Power Windows, Mirrors, etc taking everything out is essential. But this only took 3 hours so it is not as daunting as it may look.



Next, because the car has been sitting in the desert for 15 years, EVERYTHING is covered with dust. that also means that the Heater Box is probably filled with crud so out she comes for a rebuild:

Before


After (I used 3M foam to replace the deteriorated foam on the flappers, and I replaced the A/C filter)


That's enough for today. I'll get back at it on Sunday.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-29-2019).]

RandomTask (jguer003@odu.edu) MSG #19, 09-20-2019 08:29 PM
      Offs, I paid twice that for my formula with no t tops... but it has the 5 speed...

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #20, 09-21-2019 10:28 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by RandomTask:

Offs, I paid twice that for my formula with no t tops... but it has the 5 speed...


I found a few bargains lately on T-Tops. I'll post another thread about them later. But you still got a bargain. Any Formula in any condition is a steal at $1400.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #21, 09-23-2019 10:38 AM
      Next I need to restore the center console sub-frame. I've seen a lot worse but some of the tabs will get cracked or broken completely no matter how well cared for so while the interior is disassembled I hunted around for all the broken plastic tabs and super-glued them back in place. I also filled all cracks with plenty of superglue as well. I also ground off the rivets holding the stereo in place. If you want to reuse the original stereo then you can simply bolt this back in place but it is ALWAYS in the way if you do any stereo upgrade so it's better to remove it now than trying to do it while it is in the car. A Dremel with a cut off wheel works perfectly.


One other essential change is to replace the 7mm screws on the side with 7mm screws with large washers like these from the front trunk area. These crack easily so gluing the area and then putting larger washers on solves the problem.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-29-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #22, 09-26-2019 10:08 PM
      Moving right along:

FYI. restoring a car is a lot easier and faster than restoring AND modifying. Changing from Auto to 5-speed is not particularly difficult but it is time consuming because you have to first remove all the Auto stuff and then add the 5-speed stuff. Along the way, I have lots are parts that need repair or restoration such as the headlight motors, the front wiring harness (mouse nibbles), heater box, and so on.

The next step is to remove the hood. BIG TIP: Using foam plumbing noodles is a great way to protect panels



Since I am upgrading the horsepower, there will never be a better time to replace the radiator. I'm going to install a 3 core aluminum radiator so the first job is to remove the old one. I also removed the headlight assemblies and front wiring harness (all of which need repairs). Great time to do a little front end clean-up! BIG TIP: to remove the front wiring harness you must first remove the two 10mm bolts holding the upper AC condenser brackets. These are held in by RUBBER compression nuts. Be sure to pre-spray with lots of WD-40 or penetrating lube and let sit for an hour before SLOWLY turning the bolts out. Otherwise, you will just tear up the nuts and need to replace them.


Routing the clutch hydraulic line is not an easy job. You have to remove the old auto coolant lines (which I have left in place for this picture) I do not need them so I will just cut them out with dykes and recycle them. But if you need to keep them for some reason, you have to remove the intermediate steering shaft and drop the driver side coolant line, as well as removing the nuts and bolts underneath. The new 5-speed line will go back in the same location. The 1987 line I am using fits perfectly onto the 1988 except for the front end because of the different suspension in 1988. Just drill a new hole for the line clamp to hold onto something solid.


And here is the new line waiting for the Clutch Master cylinder....which I can not mount until I get the new pedal assembly in place later.


The front compartment is now completely put back together. I scavenged the plastic valence from a parts car and cleaned it up. I also replaced the AC Accumulator and filter. Looks great!


I had enough time today to clean up the entire interior and install the 5-speed shifter! The pedals, wiring, and steering column are next.


Over the next few evenings, I will repair the front wiring harness and rebuild the headlight motors to complete the entire front end except fr some more detailing. BIG TIP: if you are going to do some repainting, remove the panels enough to clean behind them. The last thing you want is loose dust flying around when you are spaying on paint. CLEAN EVERYWHERE!

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

Fiero Thomas (tom@fieronews.net) MSG #23, 09-27-2019 12:06 AM
      Toddster your photos are not showing up

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #24, 09-27-2019 09:51 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Fiero Thomas:

Toddster your photos are not showing up


I see them. They are in Photobucket, maybe there was a glitch last night. who else is having trouble?


Neils88 (nellerin@dal.ca) MSG #25, 09-27-2019 06:31 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


I see them. They are in Photobucket, maybe there was a glitch last night. who else is having trouble?


I'm having the same issue. None of the pics are showing up.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #26, 09-27-2019 07:25 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Neils88:


I'm having the same issue. None of the pics are showing up.


That's freakish, I am looking right at them. Maybe it is your web service provider or browser? Do you at least see an ICON of some sort? Cliff you have any suggestions?

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #27, 09-28-2019 11:09 PM
      OK, hoping people can see these pics. I needed to first repair the front wiring harness which had mouse nibbles and some previous owner "repairs".


Before:


It is important to remember that crimp connectors are INTERIOR USE ONLY! In the front headlight area they will get dirt and water and crud, the result being corrosion. These MUST be soldered and covered with heat shrink tubing.
After:


Tomorrow I will clean up the harness, add some new electrical tape, replace the bulbs, and re-install.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 09-28-2019).]

Fiero Thomas (tom@fieronews.net) MSG #28, 09-28-2019 11:14 PM
      Still no photos. when you click on them it says this

You don't have authorization to view this page.

Is your page set to private?

Thomas


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #29, 09-28-2019 11:22 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Fiero Thomas:

Still no photos. when you click on them it says this

You don't have authorization to view this page.

Is your page set to private?

Thomas


No, it's "Public" but perhaps there is something about the URL that is incomplete. Let me experiment. Stick around




hnthomps (hnt100@aol.com) MSG #30, 09-29-2019 08:29 AM
      All of the photos show up just fine for me.

Nelson


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #31, 09-29-2019 11:00 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by hnthomps:

All of the photos show up just fine for me.

Nelson


Yeah, we got it fixed. It was weird, I had to open my ipad and look at the thread while not signed in to see it the way others did. It was a URL issue, we're good to go now.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #32, 09-29-2019 11:20 PM
      Whenever I get my hands on a Fiero that has sat for a while there are just some things you have to assume need work and with 113K miles I felt like the headlight motors would be one of them and I was right. The new pucks are on top and the original ones just below them.


You need to check the gear teeth as well, if any are damaged you will need to replace the gear. I got lucky and both are fine. a little white grease and it can all go back together.




Next is a little clean up of the headlight assembly and put it all back together.


After doing the other side I was able to reinstall the repaired wiring harness and headlight assemblies.


I am just waiting on delivery of a new 3-core aluminum radiator and the front 1/3 of the car will be done!


red GT MSG #33, 10-02-2019 05:22 AM
      I really enjoy reading these types of posts. The car is looking really nice and can't wait to see more. Thank you taking the the time to share your updates through your restoration / build.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #34, 10-02-2019 11:17 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by red GT:

I really enjoy reading these types of posts. The car is looking really nice and can't wait to see more. Thank you taking the the time to share your updates through your restoration / build.


Thanks for the appreciation. I do these threads for posterity so I am glad it is useful to others. That is the goal.

Since the original wiring harness was for a bare bones Fiero it lacked a lot of options. It was also for a Auto so to save time and effort, I am simply ripping it out and replacing the entire interior harness with the harness from the donor car. The one problem with the donor is that some one had cut off the stereo plugs. No problem, I can use the original harness plug and solder it in place with some heat shrink tubing and we are back to factory fresh.



Aside from adding the harness from the donor and the subwoofer I also want to tackle one common problem with 80's cars...not enough POWER! I snipped the power block plug end off the donor harness and made myself a new power port for mounting under the dash. This will plug right into a spare port in the power panel and I will have permanent power.



After installing the new wiring harness I can now install the donor steering column as well. The electro-mechanical portion of the job is almost done!


Finally, the new 3-core radiator arrived. I just mocked it in place. Some modification to the rubber mounts needs to be done. I'll get to the next and get whole thing installed and re-assembled.


Flying_Dan (dan_root@mail.com) MSG #35, 10-02-2019 02:40 PM
      Inspiring!

I need to get to work on converting my AT to 5spd.

Looks good and another Fiero will be saved.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #36, 10-03-2019 08:03 PM
      The original Master Cylinder from the donor car is not much to look at. Also, rebuilding it is not much cheaper than just replacing it so out with the old



and in with the new. I prefer cast iron to the original thin steel. If you want to, you can paint it for a clean look but the cast iron is stronger and thicker than stock.



That goes for the Slave Cylinder as well



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #37, 10-03-2019 08:09 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Flying_Dan:

Inspiring!

I need to get to work on converting my AT to 5spd.

Looks good and another Fiero will be saved.


It is not a simple task but if you have the time and patience, it will add loads of value and fun.


blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #38, 10-05-2019 08:27 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


Let's see a picture of the Formula!


Toddster,
First, let me say this: Cool Thread!

Reference Pictures, sorry, I've never figured out how. Doesn't really matter, my 88 CJB is just another Formula and looks just like yours.
My 3800SC Formula has some rear side scoops air inserts (made by someone I don't remember) that look cool and provide for air to flow over the rear brakes but other than that, both my Formulas are pretty "stock" looking. Both are five speed gear boxes.

Some day, some one will want my T Top Formula. Maybe not today but, some day. Doesn't really matter, all it costs is a little bit of fuel that I put in it once in a while. I don't drive it much, just enough to make sure it's still good to go. Some day I may let the 3800SC Formula go, just not ready to do that yet. It's still fun to drive. My real problem is, storage. Recently moved south and still haven't got that shop built. The T Top is sheltered and so is my Valkyrie motorcycle but, everything else is out in the elements. Told the spousal unit, this has got to change. Just a matter of time and money. Just discovered that Mississippi doesn't allow Lottery sales. Bummer, who knew...……….

Rams

[This message has been edited by blackrams (edited 10-05-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #39, 10-07-2019 07:27 PM
      So I am walking through a wrecking yard that specializes in Fords with my son who is fixing up a 1964 Mustang. The guy had everything, galaxies, mercury coupes, falcons, an original 427 side oiler, 428 Cobra Jet, etc. Anyway, As I turn the corner, there is this 1988 Fiero Coupe! While working on the 5-speed conversion I was head scratching over where I am going to get an original 1988 5-speed pallex pattern shifter surround and BOOM! Ther it was.....in the last place on Earth I would expect to find it! Undamaged, just needs a cleaning.





blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #40, 10-08-2019 01:02 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:

So I am walking through a wrecking yard that specializes in Fords

SNIP

Anyway, As I turn the corner, there is this 1988 Fiero Coupe! While working on the 5-speed conversion I was head scratching over where I am going to get an original 1988 5-speed pallex pattern shifter surround and BOOM! Ther it was.....in the last place on Earth I would expect to find it! Undamaged, just needs a cleaning.


One never knows where the next needed part will show up. Persistence is the key. Excellent find!

Rams


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #41, 10-08-2019 02:23 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by blackrams:


One never knows where the next needed part will show up. Persistence is the key. Excellent find!

Rams


I know, fate tends to be bizarre at times. I will be moving south myself so I empathize. I have to concern myself with some storage as well.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #42, 10-13-2019 09:25 PM
      This weekend I removed the Fenders, Doors and Fascia to do more cleaning underneath and move forward on getting the interior back together.

First, I relocated the antenna out of the way. First I grabbed some aluminum angle and self tappers


Next, Set it in place to run along the inside of the passenger fender


Next, drill a hole in the edge of the frame rail and file the edges smooth, then using heavy duty zip ties strap the end of the antenna to the frame rail with a piece of rubber in between. The quality of the signal is about 90% that of the standard configuration. Good enough for me.


I really hate cheap paint work and this car had some patch paintwork done. It is not all over the car but a few parts got a respray and they didn't mask very well. No better time than now to touch up the door jams with some chassis black!


Next, get the interior back together. Starting with the first thing that has to go in, the headliner. T-Top headliners are a pain because the only thing holding them together is literally the headliner fabric. Once it goes, you have a challenge ahead. Here is how to cope. Start with a coat hanger, some thick card stock, a stapler, and some spray glue.


Cut the coat hanger into two sections about 6" ling and give them a slight bend to fit the contour of the headliner.


Then glue them in and hold tem down with heavy card stock (also glued) AND stapled. It will be rock solid.


Spray glue the liner and the backer board, let sit for 3 minutes and roll it out one half at a time and gently smooth it in.


BBefore you install it, remove the center T-Bar and give it a clean and touch-up the paint if needed, then re-install before you put the headliner in. Time to install. Extra hands help here. Install all the odds and ends to hold it in place.


Now the fun part, cutting-in the T-Tops. This needs to be done in stages. You can always remove mor material, you CAN'T put it back so go slowly!


After pressing in the headliner tap in the rubber trim ring over the headliner and I trial fit the end caps. Looks good!




The carpets got a pressure wash and the computer for the 5-Speed went in.



Tomorrow, the doors get a cleaning and get installed, along with the rest of the interior.


Sage (sgwfiberglass@gmail.com) MSG #43, 10-14-2019 10:11 AM
      Great project....excellent coverage of progress and very nice work!

Fantastic job Mr. Toddster!

HAGO!


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #44, 10-15-2019 12:54 PM
      I decided to rebuild the doors since the motors are kinda weak and there is some rust that needs to be tackled. It is just surface rust but I don't want it to become worse so I am taking the doors apart and hitting them with a coat of paint. I will post that later today.

So in the meantime, I am getting the interior back together. For the time being, I am sticking with the stock stereo. I will upgrade eventually but before I do I want to know that the car works and all systems are operational before I complicate things. So I slipped a couple of retainers onto the holes and slipped the support bracket on and held it down with a couple of 10mm screws. the best part, this is removable and restoreable anytime I like.





time for the dashboard and instrumentation. all got a good cleaning and armor-all treatment.


One of the annoying aspects of a Formula is the 4 spoke steering wheel and the omnipresent problem of broken horn buttons. I had a good left button and I salvaged a steering wheel off a 1986 SE with a good right button. one crimp later and presto.


I also found time to re-assemble the front end. After some cleaning, touch-up paint on the chassis and a good buff on the paint, it is looking good. I will repaint the car in a year or so but this looks good enough for a 5 foot car for now.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #45, 10-16-2019 11:50 PM
      So today I took the donor car doors and stripped them down and cleaned them up. I tested the motors and solenoid and everything works like new. The hinge pins were a bit worn however so I just swapped the hinges from the original doors which are perfect. I cleaned and greased the window metal tracks and the window operate like new now. But when I started to put the door together I noticed something.........................what is missing from this door?...........I didn't even notice at first. Take a look as see if you can guess and then scroll to the bottom to see if you got it.

This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

Before putting the panels back together the first step is to make this car serviceable down the road when I get ready to give it a new paint job. And that means getting rid of he rivets! Rivets are a hassle. They might make manufacturing easy but they make servicing a pain so when ever possible I swap in riv-nuts instead. I first drill out the rivet holes to allow a M6 riv-nut. Brass or Stainless are the best for a steel frame.







This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

Finally for this evening, stinking up the house with melted plastic. The overflow reservoir had a few splits in it and since I didn't have a spare it comes down to plastic welding. I just used my soldering iron and a little patience and it's as good as new.



If you read the first paragraph then here is the answer, the flange that holds the lip of the panel to the door frame is missing! So I drilled out the spot welds on the original door and plan to weld the flange to the donor door. But it won't fit because the profile is different soooooooooooooooooooo, ugh, I have to get a new donor door. Grrrrr.

This images is larger than 153600 bytes. Click to view.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-29-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #46, 10-18-2019 12:10 AM
      Too much to do today so tonight I am just doing a little trim repair.


blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #47, 10-19-2019 11:55 PM
      Bump for an interesting and entertaining thread.

Rams


turbo86se (jstup301@gmail.com) MSG #48, 10-22-2019 10:15 AM
      Oh wow this thread is great! Thank you for the pics and explanation of the manual swap. I'm in the slow process of swapping my '87 GT to a manual, and I've got it really stripped down, like bare bones. What has been the hardest part so far? I read that removing the auto pedal assembly is rough because of the wiring. Please keep the pics coming!

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #49, 10-22-2019 01:29 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by turbo86se:

Oh wow this thread is great! Thank you for the pics and explanation of the manual swap. I'm in the slow process of swapping my '87 GT to a manual, and I've got it really stripped down, like bare bones. What has been the hardest part so far? I read that removing the auto pedal assembly is rough because of the wiring. Please keep the pics coming!


Yes, the way they route the wiring means you have to pull it out of the way of the bracket to get the bracket out. The bracket has sharp edges and the danger is that you can damage the harness. But a little careful maneuvering and it comes out eventually. The key is having the dashboard out of the way. Don't even think about trying it with the dashboard in place.

More details and pics soon. Been busy with other stuff lately.


Fiero Thomas (tom@fieronews.net) MSG #50, 10-22-2019 02:54 PM
      Great job with the build Toddster. I enjoy reading about this.



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #51, 10-22-2019 11:28 PM
      Nothing is more frustrating than swapping what you THINK is a compatible part and it turns out not to be. The passenger door I took from my donor Fiero was replaced at some point. The door was from a 1984 Fiero and the door is NOT compatible with later models due to the way the door panels are attached. as such I had to grab a donor door from a different parts car and tear it apart and rebuild it all over again.

This is something you have to expect from time to time when working on older cars. But with some intrepidity I managed to get it done! Check it out, NO MORE RIVETS! Everything is held in with rivenuts and welded-in nuts with 6mm screws and bolts.



With the Door skins finally on you can see some of the subtle changes with new wiper blades (arms repainted of course), leather seats from a GT in very nice shape!, nose badge re-glued, etc.



Now is the time to TEST it ALL! hook up a battery to the fusable link and a neg to any ground and check all the interior gadgets before moving onto the engine. IT ALL WORKS!



One tip, I always use a new project folder to toss receipts in to be reconciled later. Office depot has them.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-22-2019).]

fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #52, 10-23-2019 11:14 AM
      Todd, I would highly recommend Rodney’s slave and master cylinders. Brian and I replaced mine on my 88GT with parts from a local store, then tore our hair out trying to figure out why the clutch system wasn’t working right. We replaced both with Rodney parts and they have been working perfectly for well over 100,000 miles.

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #53, 10-23-2019 11:24 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:

Todd, I would highly recommend Rodney’s slave and master cylinders. Brian and I replaced mine on my 88GT with parts from a local store, then tore our hair out trying to figure out why the clutch system wasn’t working right. We replaced both with Rodney parts and they have been working perfectly for well over 100,000 miles.


I already have the parts but for the future I will definitely look into that. One thing I always try to do with a master and slave swap is go with cast iron, it just lasts longer and performs more reliably than rolled steel in my experience. I know that sounds counter-intuitive but I had the same issues as you with the original parts.


fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #54, 10-23-2019 12:29 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


I already have the parts but for the future I will definitely look into that. One thing I always try to do with a master and slave swap is go with cast iron, it just lasts longer and performs more reliably than rolled steel in my experience. I know that sounds counter-intuitive but I had the same issues as you with the original parts.


The problem we had wasn't the metal parts, it was the seals/plunger. We figured out that the rubber plunger was so poor, fluid was just sloshing past it, and the clutch wasn't able to completely engage/disengauge. And this was right after installation, not later on.

I know you already have the parts, but it might be worth biting the bullet and getting the Rodney parts. You might avoid future headaches.



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #55, 10-23-2019 10:33 PM
      Today I started on the door panels to get the interior finished. The original door panels won't work, not because of the crank holes but because of the manual mirror hole. So I grabbed a set off my 1987 GT donor. But they needed some cleaning big time! First I removed the 1987 map pockets (BTW, that is a pain in the nuts! Literally. The nuts they used at the factory are on backwards as far as I am concerned and anyone who has tried ot remove them knows what I mean). I turn them over and use a standard 8mm socket and they go on easy and spread the load better.



I used a stiff bristle brush with some degreaser and then hosed them off after a good scrubbing. After an hour in the sun, they are clean and dry and ready for a new set of '88 map pockets from the Mall thanks to Chief!



BOOM! BTW, use new plastic press fittings. I use the spin in type, they are much better than stock.



Next step is to re-assemble the panels. I DO plan to repaint the car eventually, but we have to move next month and I just don't have the time for sanding and prep before then so the great thing is I can just pop the panels off since they are now just bolted in instead of riveted in. On the valance I use button cap screws to allow the plastic trim pieces to fit back in but underneath I use hex heads. And for God's sake, use stainless!



There is just something about a door with new dew wipes:





OK, the front 1/3 of the car is 99% done



The middle 1/3rd of the car is 99% done



The last 1/3rd.........ugh. Fortunately, this is the EASIEST part. Yes, you heard that right, it is just unbolt and bolt on parts. No drama or weird stuff, no customizing, or mysteries.



The old girl looks pretty good with her new shoes on up front.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-25-2019).]

blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #56, 10-25-2019 08:32 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


I know, fate tends to be bizarre at times. I will be moving south myself so I empathize. I have to concern myself with some storage as well.


South? Since you already have your current location in your profile, may I ask where the new location is going to be?
One never knows where we're going to end up. I never expected to be buying/living in Southern Mississippi but, here I am.
BTW, moving sucks, the older you are, the more it sucks.
Take my advice on this, all that stuff you and your lovely wife have had stored in the attic and never used for years, give it away.
If you haven't used or needed it in the last few years, the chances are, you won't ever need it again.
I've moved the same "Junk" from one storage place to another for the last three moves because someone in this family thinks we should keep it. No names mentioned.

Rams



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #57, 10-25-2019 10:00 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by blackrams:


South? Since you already have your current location in your profile, may I ask where the new location is going to be?
One never knows where we're going to end up. I never expected to be buying/living in Southern Mississippi but, here I am.
BTW, moving sucks, the older you are, the more it sucks.
Take my advice on this, all that stuff you and your lovely wife have had stored in the attic and never used for years, give it away.
If you haven't used or needed it in the last few years, the chances are, you won't ever need it again.
I've moved the same "Junk" from one storage place to another for the last three moves because someone in this family thinks we should keep it. No names mentioned.

Rams


We are leaving California and heading to Atlanta, Roswell to be exact. My job transfer is Dec 1 so we put an offer on a house and we are packing up! And yes, we already put tons of stuff on craig's list!


blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #58, 10-25-2019 10:33 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


We are leaving California and heading to Atlanta, Roswell to be exact. My job transfer is Dec 1 so we put an offer on a house and we are packing up! And yes, we already put tons of stuff on craig's list!


Excellent, pretty sure there's an active Fiero group in that area. I pass through or near that city quite often. One never knows but, if you see another white 88 Formula CJB on the street, it's most likely me (lost).

Rams


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #59, 10-25-2019 11:24 PM
      Today I started to dis-assemble the donor engine. I need the wiring harness, transmission, mounts, and axles. The exhaust was a pain, lots of rust but I got it with some effort. Let WD-40 soak in over night and then a bit of heat.



The wiring harness is in surprisingly good condition. A bit dirty but I'll run a continuity test on it and replace only two plug ends!

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-25-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #60, 10-25-2019 11:41 PM
      Seems fitting.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-26-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #61, 10-26-2019 09:31 PM
      Today I split the Getrag 5-Speed from the engine of the donor car. I'll rebuild this for another project soon but for now, it gets a cleaning, strapped to a stand, bag and tag.



Now for the part I need, the 5-Speed MG-282 transmission. I left the axles in for now because it makes it easier to clean and evaluate condition. I will replace the gear oil, seals, and throw-out bearing. I will wait to clean it until I get the engine out of the Formula so I can do it all at once. The pressure washer makes a mess!



I suspected as much but it is nice to see my suspicions confirmed, the clutch is toast! Look at those heat marks on the flywheel and pressure plate. It's a good thing I bought all new stuff.



Tomorrow I pull the engine out of the Formula as well as the Gas tank so I can empty it and replace the fuel pump and filter.


blackrams (blackrams7@aol.com) MSG #62, 10-27-2019 07:49 AM
      My Lord, with the upcoming move, I am impressed with your progress on this project. Not sure what vitamins you take but, think'n I should get some.

Rams


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #63, 10-27-2019 09:27 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by blackrams:

My Lord, with the upcoming move, I am impressed with your progress on this project. Not sure what vitamins you take but, think'n I should get some.

Rams


COFFEE!!! Lots and lots of COFFEE!


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #64, 10-27-2019 09:30 PM
      Just getting ready to pull the engine. FYI, THIS is the worst rust on the entire car.



I think I know why the car was laid-up, the firewall side exhaust manifold has a loose bolt. Undoubtedly it was running rough. But the good news is NO CRACK! I can clean-out the flashing and it will be better than new!



If you haven't read my thread on pulling a V-6 engine, here it is: http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum9/HTML/000024.html

And this is the result.



The next step is to pull the gas tank. I need to drain the old stale gas and replace the pump and filter.



After a good inspection of everything I can see that the donor transmission has been ridden hard and put-up wet. The rear main seal was bad and just look at that goo! Fortunatley, it shifts well, the gear oil is clean, and with a good cleaning and new seals, it should be good to go.



Tomorrow, I will take care of the gas tank and break down the engine for cleaning.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #65, 10-29-2019 05:08 PM
      Job one after getting the engine out was to clean it well enough to work with it. Pressure washers are great for this as they can get all the gunk off. I removed the alternator before cleaning. Several details become clear right away, the alternator, muffler, and starter have all been replaced! As I get further into the engine I am sure I will find other upgrades that had not been documented.



The next step is the transmission which was REALLY dirty. After cleaning I now need to remove the clutch arm for rust removal and polishing. This thing sat for a long time. I can't make this point clearly enough, Cleaning your parts is critical! Those little "fins" and "vanes" on your transmission are for heat dissipation as much as they are for strength. Many of the problems your car has is heat retention in all the wrong places. We will talk more about that when I break the engine down but for now, suffice it to say that a clean engine will last longer and run better.



Today I got a tap in the mail which allowed me to finish one last item up front. I bought the 3 core aluminum radiator online but I did not think to ask if the overflow spigot came with it (seemed redundant but as I learned, it isn't! So ASK!). There was a 7mm hole there but nothing in it. Now the problem is that even if I had a 7mm spigot, it would not be large enough for good overflow so I found one on Summit that was 10mm. The thread pitch is 1mm however (which is an oddball size, so I had to order a tap).



Step 1 was to drill out the hole with a 11/32 drill bit and tap the hole with the 10x1.0 tap. A paper towel prevents debris from getting into the radiator.



with some teflon tape the spigot looks like it was made that way.



The finished product



And the finished front end is now ready for the hood to go back on.



Next I had to replace the fuel pump after draining the gas tank of the varnish in there. That is the easy part, setting the gas gauge is not so easy. It should ideally read 90 to 0 ohms (90ohms = Full and 0 ohms = Empty). Now I personally don't care so much if the needle goes past F when FULL but I hate not having it hit E when EMPTY. The fact is there is nothing you can do about it. The closest I have ever calibrated these was 2.9 ohms; which isn't bad considering they are usually set around 10 ohms from the factory, meaning you run out of gas with 1/8th of a tank showing on your gauge. The Ohm meter probes should go in at the yellow plug for the most accuracy. I got this one down to 3.5 ohms; close enough! To do it, disassemble the resistor and use an emery board to clean the corrosion off the filaments (BE CAREFUL, the filaments are very thin, use the buffing side of the board here), also clean the springs, and the contact patch where the spring contacts the metal plate with the emery board. Re-assemble and use a T-10 Torx to adjust until you get the right readings.



[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 10-29-2019).]

fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #66, 10-30-2019 12:07 PM
      Is there a more detailed write up on, specifically, doing the adjustments on the fuel sending unit? I’d really like to do this on my cars. I have yet another fuel tank I’ve just dropped, so this would be a great opportunity to learn and apply this.

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #67, 10-30-2019 09:32 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:

Is there a more detailed write up on, specifically, doing the adjustments on the fuel sending unit? I’d really like to do this on my cars. I have yet another fuel tank I’ve just dropped, so this would be a great opportunity to learn and apply this.


There isn't much more to it. You need a T-10 Torx bit, there are 2 adjustment screws and then you just use your ohm meter to check resistance as you raise or lower the lever. Then adjust the screws as needed. The one thing to be sure you do for a car that has sat for a while is clean the corrosion off the leads and contact points first. It takes a lot of fiddling around but with patience you will find the right combo to get the lowest reading.

Today I separated the engine and transmission from the cradle and mounted the engine on a stand, ready for tear down. I am only taking it back to the long block since I tested it and it turns over easily by hand and has very clean oil. I just want to get it clean, replace the timing gear, water pump, and test each sensor and injector as I go and replace as needed.



The Auto transmission is in GREAT shape. Easily driven, the forward motor mount looks like new! So this tranny will fit well in another 1988 GT which needs a trans badly. I'll give it a clean and save for the other project. NOTE: the axle nuts are on the ends of the axles, this will protect the threads from damage while moving around and it means I won't lose the nuts.





With the tranny out I can now get to work cleaning the cradle before installing the 5-speed manual transmission. The bushings are SHOT! so I have some new poly going in after I get it cleaned-up.





fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #68, 10-31-2019 12:32 AM
      I highly recommend Rodneys zero lash end links. It is an amazing upgrade to the handling.

Steel MSG #69, 10-31-2019 06:40 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:

I highly recommend Rodneys zero lash end links. It is an amazing upgrade to the handling.


+1

Great thread, enjoying it.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #70, 10-31-2019 09:28 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:

I highly recommend Rodneys zero lash end links. It is an amazing upgrade to the handling.


Agreed! I remember his original Double Heim Joint versions.


fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #71, 10-31-2019 03:09 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


Agreed! I remember his original Double Heim Joint versions.



Also, his 88 front wheel bearings are amazing. Rides like a new car.


fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #72, 10-31-2019 04:55 PM
      I started a new thread in Tech where I posted questions and pictures to help get more information on the fuel sender clean up and calibration. Toddster, if you have time, please drop by? All feedback is appreciated.

http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum2/HTML/143127.html


fierogt28 MSG #73, 10-31-2019 07:13 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:
Also, his 88 front wheel bearings are amazing. Rides like a new car.


Which ones, the HD front bearing? Or his reproduction original...?



fierogt28 MSG #74, 10-31-2019 07:16 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierobear:
Also, his 88 front wheel bearings are amazing. Rides like a new car.


Which ones, the HD front bering? Or his reproduction original...?



fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #75, 11-01-2019 09:56 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierogt28:


Which ones, the HD front bering? Or his reproduction original...?



It should be this one, the latest that is serviceable

http://rodneydickman.com/ca....php?products_id=427


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #76, 11-01-2019 07:11 PM
      So we are moving in 2 weeks and I just do not have the time to do the detailing in the engine bay that I would normally do. So I am just going to get the engine running so that it moves on it's own. Then I will get back to work on it once I have a new workshop set-up at the new house. So today I took down the top of the engine and cleaned out the carbon. This thing was running RICH! wow, I'm surprised it ran at all with that exhaust leak. But the cylinders all have good compression and it should run fine once built back up correctly.



I also cleaned the cradle and tranny and mounted them together.



It is important to remember that when you change from an AUTO to a 5-Speed, you need to move the front motor mount from the right set of cradle holes to the left.



This weekend I will reassemble the engine and mate it to the tranny


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #77, 11-04-2019 06:34 PM
      OK, it's time to get this thing fixed up and put together. The long term goal is a new high performance engine. Bu for the time being, I just want to get this one running and reliable until next spring.

The first step is to get the fatal flaw in the stock Fiero engine fixed, the infamous exhaust port flashing. This is the before. Car and Driver did an analysis of this problem and, although they didn't go as far as pointing out that THIS is the reason for the majority of Fiero engine fires, they did mention that it was a hazard and removing it would gain you between 7-9 horsepower with no other mods!



After using a Hole Dozer 27mm hole saw and a rotary rasp.



OH, and never re-install without chasing those rusted out threads with a tap!



Lastly, clean the mating surface and sheck for level. if there are any gaps you will need to plane the surface



I always take a wire wheel to the vin and block numbers to make sure I have the original engine and I can document it.



The next step it to replace the timing chain. The fact is that after 100k miles, your chain will develop a lot of slop. Even as easily as this engine has been driven, you can see the slack on the left side of the chain. Badly loosened chains will actually have broken the guide tabs off!



This is what it should look like. And if you are keeping the stock crankshaft drive gear (which I am because it is in perfect condition) then it takes 2 minutes work! Notice the timing marks pointing towards each other indicating TDC.



Next, replace the front crankshaft seal and put on the new waterpump! Make sure to clean the mating surfaces well before installing the new gaskets with a thin film of RTV as a bonding agent.



Lastly, install the new flywheel, clutch and pressureplate, ANd throw-out bearing before spening 45 minutes thrying to wrestle the tranny and engine together.



Tomorrow I will work on the wiring harness, cross-over pipe from the donor car (the stock Auto Tranny cross-over will not work), then bolt all the accessories on.

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 11-04-2019).]

fierogt28 MSG #78, 11-04-2019 08:58 PM
      Great work Toddster...

Did you replace the timing cover, or just cleaned up the original?

Thanks,



fierobear (fierodsl@pacbell.net) MSG #79, 11-05-2019 02:02 AM
     
 
quote
Lastly, install the new flywheel, clutch and pressureplate, ANd throw-out bearing before spening 45 minutes thrying to wrestle the tranny and engine together.


To make this easier (and it should be much less than 45 minutes)...

1. Hang the transaxle using two 18mm cradle bolts in the top two transaxle holes

2. While putting forward pressure on the transaxle, rotate the engine using either a remote starter (making short presses on the button), or with a 19mm socket on the bolt at the center of the harmonic balancer usually a two person job). The transaxle should pop into place .

3. Put all of the other bolts in place and tighten on the transaxle. Then remove the cradle bolts and put the correct bolts in place. Done.


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #80, 11-05-2019 10:27 AM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by fierogt28:

Great work Toddster...

Did you replace the timing cover, or just cleaned up the original?

Thanks,



Yes, I did replace the cam gear but not the crank gear. Ideally, you should replace both (and I do have a puller) but the crank gear was so unworn that I elected to save the time and effort.



Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #81, 11-10-2019 10:47 AM
      OK folks, Up to now I have been reassembling the engine and yesterday Evan and I put it in the car.

One of the "Must Do's" is turfing the TBI coolant lines. Not only do they rob you of power but they are in the way of every sensor, module, and bolt you need access too. Since the MAP sensor is attached you need to hack off the MAP sensor bracket first. as for the coolant outlets on the thermostat housing you can just loop over a piece small hose but I prefer to cut them off and weld up the holes.



There are 3 main changes you need to make when you swap a pre-88 engine and harness into a 1988 car. 1) the cross over pipe will point directly at the torsion bar and needs a bit of a bend upwards to clear it. 2) The pigtail for the CS130 alternator needs to be changed, 3) the oil pressure sending unit is different and need a new pigtail as well (optional). You can just use a pre-88 pressure sending unit, as I am doing here. Also notice that I removed the bulkhead heat sheild (The leaf catcher) and used thermal wrap instead. This will make maintenance so much easier, improves heat retention, reduces underhood temps, and looks cool too.



For the cross over pipe the solution is to use your BFP. No workshop is complete without one. You only need to bend it up about 1 inch. TIP, do not use a pry bar or some other object inside the crossover pipe, you'll just warp the thin metal, use a large pipe OVER the outer diameter of the crossover pipe.



The pigtail is an off the shelf item at any NAPA store. Connect the red wire to red, the brown wire to brown, and don't connect the black wire to anything (just tape it down). Boom, that is literally all there is to a CS130 upgrade. For the Red Wire, your average 25w solder iron will not work, you need a 100-300watt solder gun.



The previous owner didn't like the crumby stainless exhuast tips (can't blame him) so he put some crumby tip covers over them. they just screw on, so I removed them and used plumbers tape to sand the crud off the tips while I had the chance. I will get after it with some metal polish when I have time for detailing.



Finally! time to put the engine back in. 2 hours work we had it back where it belongs.



We still need to bleed the brakes. I will eventually upgrade the brakes, struts, rotors, etc but for now I just need it running. I had a spare set of sway bar poly bushings so I installed those. TIP, always do this last when installing and first when removing the engine. If you leave them attached you will never get the struts spread far enough apart to slide up into the strut towers.



Today we will bleed everything, reconnect all the hoses, cables, wires, etc. and get it on the ground. with luck, we will have it running today!

[This message has been edited by Toddster (edited 11-10-2019).]

Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #82, 12-17-2019 07:35 AM
      Well, we are moved into the new house! And exhausted. I have the garage semi organized but I still need to run another outlet into it before I can truly ramp-up the project again.

We are on Roswell Georgia and loving it...y'all



Raydar (raydarfiero@comcast.net) MSG #83, 12-17-2019 05:14 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:
...

We are on Roswell Georgia and loving it...y'all


Dude... WTF?!
Didn't see that coming.

Welcome to the South. Bless your heart.

Nice house, BTW.

[This message has been edited by Raydar (edited 12-17-2019).]

mrfiero (mrfiero@juno.com) MSG #84, 12-17-2019 10:56 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Toddster:


We are on Roswell Georgia and loving it...y'all




Wait a few months when the humidity switch gets turned on and then see how you feel!


Toddster (toddamelio@gmail.com) MSG #85, 12-19-2019 03:08 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Raydar:


Dude... WTF?!
Didn't see that coming.

Welcome to the South. Bless your heart.

Nice house, BTW.



Thanks, we'll definitely need to grab a cup of yule tide cheer soon!


Fiero Thomas (tom@fieronews.net) MSG #86, 02-10-2020 07:32 PM
      Been awhile. What you up to with this build??????



IMSA GT (drumwzrd@comcast.net) MSG #87, 02-14-2020 04:50 PM
     
 
quote
Originally posted by Fiero Thomas:

Been awhile. What you up to with this build??????



Todd recently moved from California to Georigia so I assume that is why there are no recent updates.